November 17, 2017

Archives for May 2013

Connecticut: Governor Signs eBook-Public Library Availability Study Legislation Into Law

UPDATED POST (June 12, 2013): Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy signed the ebook-public library study legislation (An Act Concerning a Study Regarding the Availability of Electronic Books to Users of Public Libraries, HB 5614) into law last week. From a Statement by Connecticut Library Association President, Richard Conroy: The act requires the Commissioner of Consumer Protection to conduct a study […]

Connecticut: Governor Signs eBook-Public Library Availability Study Legislation Into Law

UPDATED POST (June 12, 2013): Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy signed the ebook-public library study legislation (An Act Concerning a Study Regarding the Availability of Electronic Books to Users of Public Libraries, HB 5614) into law last week. From a Statement by Connecticut Library Association President, Richard Conroy: The act requires the Commissioner of Consumer Protection to conduct a study […]

Collection Development 2020 | Library Journal’s Day of Dialog

Ebooks. Self publishing. Platforms, platforms, platforms. It’s hard enough to keep up now; what will collection development librarians’ jobs look like in 2020? At LJ’s Day of Dialog, held May 29 at the McGraw-Hill auditorium in New York City, Christopher Platt, Director, Collections and Circulation Operations, New York Public Library, put that question to a panel of librarians and a publisher.

Up Close: Giving the People What They Want at Cuyahoga County Public Library, OH | Library by Design

“It’s the largest investment in our 90-year history,” says Sari Feldman about Ohio’s Cuyahoga County Public Library (CCPL) plan to renovate or rebuild 18 of its 28 branches. The $110 million spate of rebuilding, led by executive director Feldman and detailed in CCPL’s Facilities Master Plan, will create new and updated library facilities that the library says will save CCPL $4 million a year. Those savings are particularly meaningful, because since 2008 CCPL’s revenues have dropped by $14.9 million owing to state budget cuts, and since 2009 property tax revenues declined by $7 million.

METRO, SAA, NARA, Google, and Historypin Partner on “Hurricane Sandy: Record, Remember, Rebuild” Project

From the Historypin Blog: Today, Historypin is launching Hurricane Sandy: Record, Remember, Rebuild. Together with Google, the Metropolitan New York Library Council, the Society of American Archivists, and the American Association of State and Local History, the project is a shared online collection of local history as captured by individuals and cultural heritage institutions alike. […]

Hachette To Donate Audiobooks to National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

Hachette Book Group on May 29 announced plans to provide unabridged audiobook recordings for free to the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), a division of the Library of Congress (LOC). Select backlist and new titles, including new releases, will be available through NLS’s Talking Books program by the end of 2013

Writing the Wonders of Science | Library Journal’s Day of Dialog

Take a slightly long table. Cover it in black cloth. Place four chairs along the side that faces out. Invite three men who have published with great success on the endeavors of science. Place one small bottled water, one glass with ice, and one paper napkin on the table in front of each chair. No bunsen […]

SIPX Launches Content, Copyright Service

On May 21, SIPX, which provides cloud-based end-to-end copyright management and digital document delivery for higher ed, announced customer agreements with several schools and consortia, including the company’s former home, Stanford University, where the research underlying the technology was conducted over the last three years. (SIPX has now “spun-out” from Stanford, completed its financing, and is operating as a separate, for-profit company.)

Don’t Panic: Why Catastrophism Fails Libraries | Peer to Peer Review

We just celebrated an important holiday – towel day. Sadly, I only just found out about it as I browsed the Internet when I should have been working. But I will henceforth do what I can to “really know where my towel is,” to quote the late great Douglas Adams. This may come in handy, because I’ve been thinking a lot about “disruptive innovation,” MOOCs, and the millennial talk about the future of libraries. What I keep coming back to are some fairly simple concepts that actually haven’t changed much in a long time. Library values are, for me, like the towel that Ford Prefect carried. Simple, absorbent, useful in any number of situations, and likely to encourage people to think we librarians are well supplied with all the other things one needs on a trip.

What Governmental Big Data May Mean For Libraries

On May 9, President Obama signed an open data executive order and released an open data policy. Only a couple of weeks later, on May 22, Data.gov responded by launching a new data catalog on an open source data management system called CKAN, which, the site says, will enable the central implementation of the Open Data Policy, as it will harvest the data inventories that federal agencies will be creating under the directive. LJ caught up with members of the library and data-driven research communities to see what this may mean for their missions.