September 18, 2014

Read Out Loud: LGBTQ Book Buzz

LJ Webcast LGBTQBookBuzz WebHeader600x213 Read Out Loud: LGBTQ Book Buzz

SPONSORED BY:  Riptide Publishing, Dreamspinner Press, Bold Strokes Books, Samhain Publishing  and Library Journal

EVENT TIME AND DATE: Thursday, August 29, 2013, 3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 – 1:00 PM PT

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The last three decades of the 20th century saw the establishment of LGBTQ presses, bookstores, awards, and reading and book clubs, as well as literary festivals, writers’ conferences, and professional organizations. Collection development and readers’ advisory staff attending this free webcast will be prepared to meet the demand of growing interests in LGBTQ literature.

Join Library Journal and Ellen Bosman, author of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Literature: A Genre Guide (Libraries Unlimited, 2008), for this exciting preview of the latest offerings from Bold Strokes Books, Dreamspinner, Samhain Publishing, and Riptide Publishing.

Panelists
Len Barot- President, Bold Strokes Books, Inc

Len Barot, MD is the founder and president of Bold Strokes Books Inc, an independent LGBTQ publisher. Under the pseudonym Radclyffe, she has published over forty romance and romantic intrigue novels as well as dozens of short stories, and has edited numerous romance and erotica anthologies. She is an eight-time Lambda Literary Award finalist in romance, mystery, and erotica; an RWA/FF&P Prism, RWA/FTHOR Lories, RWA New England Beanpot, and RWA VCRW Laurel Wreath award winner; a Benjamin Franklin and ForeWord Review Book of the Year winner, and a member of the Saints and Sinners Literary Hall of Fame. Bold Strokes Books releases over 100 new titles annually in adult and YA LGBTQ fiction.

Jenn Stark- Marketing Manager, Samhain Publishing

Jenn Stark is the Marketing and Publicity Manager for Samhain Publishing. A twenty-year veteran of branding and marketing communications, she is also an award-winning writer who is thrilled to be sharing Samhain’s extraordinary stories of love and romance with an ever-broader audience.

Ariel Tachna- Social media and translations coordinator, Dreamspinner Press

Ariel Tachna is the social media and translations coordinator at Dreamspinner Press. She has been with the company for three years after sixteen years in public eduction and prides herself on her knowledge of the company’s catalog and authors.

Sarah Frantz- Riptide Publishing

Sarah has a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Michigan. She edited two academic collections, Women Constructing Men: Female Novelists and Their Male Characters, 1750-2000 (Lexington, 2009) and New Perspectives on Popular Romance Fiction: Critical Essays (McFarland, 2012). She is founder and past president of the International Association for the Study of Popular Romance. Sarah comes to editing from two directions: from her academic work on popular romance studies and from reviewing for Dear Author.

Moderator
Ellen Bosman - Head of Technical Services, New Mexico State University Library

Ellen Bosman, professor and head of Technical Services at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, is the author of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Literature: A Genre Guide (Libraries Unlimited, 2008). She is a former judge for the Lambda Literary Awards and a past chair of the American Library Association’s GLBT-RT Stonewall Book Awards Committee.

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Comments

  1. It’s an honor to be a Dreamspinner/Harmony Ink GLBT YA author and I can’t wait for this event. My hat’s off to you, Library Journal!

  2. Guillermo Luna says:

    There should be more gay themed books in libraries! I’m glad Library Journal is holding this event and bringing awareness to a market and reader that’s underrepresented in libraries

    Guillermo Luna
    The Odd Fellows
    Bold Strokes Books

  3. If no women were included on this panel, there would be serious complaints. But to have zero men? I think that is a slap in the face to several publishers and authors. How does a panel of all women (all cis-gendered?) know the state of gay publishing?

    • Guy L. Gonzalez Guy L. Gonzalez says:

      Mr. Berman,

      Thank you for your feedback here and via Twitter. This is a sponsored webcast focused on collection development. The participants represent the sponsoring publishers, each of whom publishes a variety of LGBTQ authors, and they will be presenting selected titles from their upcoming lists.

      While Ms. Bosman is moderating the event, she was not involved in the selection of the participants. For an even broader look at this category, be sure to check out her feature article in our August 2013 issue: “Opening the Fiction Closet.”

      Thanks again for your feedback, and you if you have any additional questions, feel free to reply here or contact me directly: glgonzalez@mediasourceinc.com

      GUY LeCHARLES GONZALEZ
      Dir., Content Strategy & Audience Dev
      Library Journals, LLC

  4. While I admit to being a gay male writer, and purposely people my novels with many gay men (as well as an assortment of heterosexual men and women), I’m aware that a fair number of my fans and appreciative critics are women. I agree with Steve Berman that variety is the spice not only of spicy novels but of panelists. Heaven knows there are plenty of gay male publishers and editors willing to speak their minds.

    • Guy L. Gonzalez Guy L. Gonzalez says:

      Mr. Mackle,

      Please see my comment to Mr. Berman above for details, but rest assured that we fully expect our presenting publishers to offer as diverse a selection of LGBTQ authors as their lists allow. And I’m sure each of them would appreciate feedback, during the webcast or even here in the comments, on opportunities you might see for them to expand their respective lists, especially in the context of improving libraries’ collection development efforts.

      Thanks for your feedback, and you if you have any additional questions, feel free to reply here or contact me directly: glgonzalez@mediasourceinc.com

      GUY LeCHARLES GONZALEZ
      Dir., Content Strategy & Audience Dev
      Library Journals, LLC

  5. I write and edit lesbian fiction, but I find this all-woman lineup disturbing. Please tell us that you just forgot to mention it, but you have plans for all-male panels, and all mtf-transgender panels, and all-ftm transgender panels, and bisexual panels, and intersex panels, and genderqueer panels, and on and on and on. Or at least a series of more inclusive panels featuring different publishers.

    • Guy L. Gonzalez Guy L. Gonzalez says:

      Ms. Green,

      Please see my comment to Mr. Berman and Mr. Mackie above for details, but rest assured that we fully expect our presenting publishers to offer as diverse a selection of LGBTQ authors as their lists allow, both on this webcast and, hopefully, in the future as more publishers recognize the demand for LGBTQ from library patrons.

      Thanks for your feedback, and you if you have any additional questions, feel free to reply here or contact me directly: glgonzalez@mediasourceinc.com

      GUY LeCHARLES GONZALEZ
      Dir., Content Strategy & Audience

  6. Jerry Wheeler says:

    I have put together my share of panels and events and know the limitations you sometimes have–people back out, people don’t answer your email or calls, etc. Still, it seems out of all the available pool of gay men, transgender individuals and bi men and women, the people responsible for putting this together should have been able to find representation for more than one letter of our acronym.

    • Guy L. Gonzalez Guy L. Gonzalez says:

      Mr. Wheeler,

      Please see my comments to Mr. Berman, Mr. Mackie, and Ms. Green above for details on who the panelists are and how/why they were selected.

      Thanks for your feedback, and you if you have any additional questions, feel free to reply here or contact me directly: glgonzalez@mediasourceinc.com

      GUY LeCHARLES GONZALEZ
      Dir., Content Strategy & Audience

  7. I think that it is admirable that Library Journal is hosting a panel such as this, but I do find it odd that the selected panelists are not fully representative of the subject being discussed — LGBTQ publishing.

    • Guy L. Gonzalez Guy L. Gonzalez says:

      Mr. Currier,

      Please see my comments to Mr. Berman, Mr. Mackie, and Ms. Green above for details on who the panelists are and how/why they were selected.

      Thanks for your feedback, and you if you have any additional questions, feel free to reply here or contact me directly: glgonzalez@mediasourceinc.com

      GUY LeCHARLES GONZALEZ
      Dir., Content Strategy & Audience

  8. What criteria was used to solicit the sponsors? As the publisher of a press focused on gay-themed works, I don’t recall receiving or hearing of any outreach towards publishers to participate as sponsors of this panel, either on my own, through other publishers, or via any social media outlet.

  9. I had no idea LJ was doing the “pay for play” gig with publishers. And it still does not dismiss the fact that whoever orchestrated this event ignored asking the sponsoring publishers to include a man or a trans-individual. This is still a sexist event.

    • Guy L. Gonzalez Guy L. Gonzalez says:

      “Pay for play” has a far more insidious meaning than would apply to a clearly sponsored webcast like this. As I explained to you on Twitter, sponsored webcasts have ZERO relationship to what does and doesn’t get reviewed (much to some sponsors’ chagrin), so the implication that something else drove the selection of this webcast’s panelists is not only wrong, but offensive.

      As I’ve explained, the panelists aren’t representing themselves or their own sexuality; they’re representing their respective publishers, presenting their upcoming LGBTQ titles, which I fully expect to represent as diverse a range of authors as possible.

      If after viewing the actual webcast, you still believe it’s “a sexist event,” there will be at least be a firmer ground for this discussion. As of know, though, you simply seem to be misunderstanding the format and seeing something that simply isn’t there.

      If you have any additional questions about this webcast prior to its occurring, feel free tocontact me directly (glgonzalez@mediasourceinc.com), otherwise I look forward to your honest feedback afterwards.

      Thanks!

  10. The point remains that you have a panel of all women discussing a range of queer books (supposedly). If you had a panel of all white publishers discussing multiculturalism, people would be offended. If you had a panel of all men discussing feminist fiction, people would be offended. If you cannot see the issue I think you are deceiving yourself.