December 19, 2014

Year in Architecture 2013: A Destination Place

A Destination Place

 

ljx131102archWebDest1b Year in Architecture 2013: A Destination Place
The new Centennial Library, Midland County Public Library, TX, was transformed from a stand-alone retail facility, the best case of “adaptive reuse.” Among the high-tech amenities in the nearly $8 million building are dedicated children’s and teen spaces featuring an interactive work wall and an interactive floor. The library also includes a media lab, movable walls and partitions, and a variety of seating options. CREDITS: Dewberry, architect; Maxwell Filmworks, photo.

 

ljx131102archWebDest2b Year in Architecture 2013: A Destination Place
The Glenvar Branch Library, Roanoke County Public Library, Salem, VA, has a high vaulted wood ceiling with clerestory windows facilitating natural light. The form respects the local history and climate, while presenting views of the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains. CREDITS: HBM Architects, architect; Sam Dean Photography, photo.

 

ljx131102archWebDest3b Year in Architecture 2013: A Destination Place
The Storytime Room at the Mission Viejo Library, CA, was a collaborative effort, painted by muralist Matthew Huchthausen and artist Kevin Pederson and designed by Robert R. Coffee Architects to replicate old Orange County farmland. CREDITS: Robert R. Coffee Architect + Associates, architect; Kathleen Kelton, photo.

 

ljx131102archWebDest4b Year in Architecture 2013: A Destination Place
The Mall Library Connection, Fort Vancouver Regional Library District, Vancouver, WA, is in leased space within the Westfield Vancouver Mall. It features an all-glass storefront with collection display, a raised platform for access, and an automated materials handling system. CREDITS: SHKS Architects, architect; ©Jeff Amram Photography, photo.

 

ljx131102archWebDest5b Year in Architecture 2013: A Destination Place
Mesa County Libraries Central Library, Grand Junction, CO, gained 9,000 square feet of space and now totals 45,000 square feet. It houses a shaded outdoor patio and a 230-person-capacity community room, a much larger teen space, and six study rooms. Natural light floods the building, and the Regional History Room received a “historically flavored” renovation. CREDITS: Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture, architect; Mesa County Libraries, photo.

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Bette-Lee Fox About Bette-Lee Fox

Bette-Lee Fox (blfox@mediasourceinc.com) is Managing Editor, Library Journal.

Celebrating her 43rd year with Library Journal, Bette-Lee also edits LJ’s Video Reviews column, six times a year Romance column, and e-original Romance reviews, which post weekly as LJ Xpress Reviews.

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