November 20, 2017

Archives for May 2014

Apple Leads to Librarianship, Hiring and Letting Go, and More Letters to LJ’s May 15 Issue

Expanding the definition of librarian, hiring the passionate, pride in the Best Small Library in Bayfield, and more letters to the editor from LJ’s May 15, 2014 issue.

Library People News: Chandler To Direct TX Library, Dailey Retires from Upstate NY County Lib.

Susan Chandler was named Director, Nesbitt Memorial Library, Elizabeth Dailey announced her retirement as Director of Onondaga County Public Library, and other new hired, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the May 15, 2014 issue of Library Journal.

The Numbers Game | Data-Driven Libraries

From learning what programs are working for patrons to being able to communicate the value of libraries to legislators and stakeholders more effectively, one thing is becoming more and more clear: having reliable data and the tools to analyze it are among the keys to a successful library system. Data can help to confirm suspicions, prove hypotheses, and offer evidence for the success of library programs. It can also dash expectations or surprise sleeping biases, forcing the rethinking or reinvention of a program that isn’t living up to its potential. Data, analyzed and contextualized, can also make it easier for librarians to tell their stories to legislators and stakeholders when the time comes to make the case for library budgets.

Gates Foundation Prepares To Exit Library Ecosystem

In early May, the Gates Foundation took much of the world by surprise by announcing that the massive charitable organization would stop offering grants and support to libraries around the world in the next few years. Libraries have long been a pillar of the Foundation’s strategy, and while the funding will be missed, librarians are already looking ahead at how to preserve the work that’s been done and find ways for other organizations to step into the space the Foundation will leave behind.

American Museum of Natural History Launches Free Online Image Database

The American Museum of Natural History’s (AMNH) research library last month hosted the official launch of its new online image database for Digital Special Collections. Begun as a project to digitize 1,000 of the museum’s photos and rare book illustrations, the Digital Special Collections program has evolved into a long-term project that will offer the public free online access to the museum’s research library collection. The new database includes more than 7,000 archival images, including photographs from 19th century scientific expeditions and illustrations from rare books dating back to the 16th century.

Crisis, Paralysis, and Progress | Peer to Peer Review

The library community has been talking about a “journal pricing crisis” for over two decades. What we have not seen so far is any kind of concerted effort to break through this cycle. But two growing movements—the push toward open access and the growth of library publishing programs—make me think that we may be reaching a tipping point. In a white paper released last month, library administrators Rebecca R. Kennison and Lisa R. Norberg describe the need for “deep structural changes” in the systems through which scholarship is created and communicated. I honestly do not know if their proposal is the one that will trigger these changes, but I know that they are pointing us in the right direction.

Smashwords and OverDrive Ink Distribution Agreement

Smashwords, the world’s largest distributor of self-published ebooks, on May 20 announced a new partnership with OverDrive that will make more than 200,000 ebooks from 80,000 self-published authors and independent presses available to libraries and their patrons via the OverDrive platform. All titles will be sold as perpetual, non-expiring licenses with no loan caps, and will be made available to patrons under a one ebook, one user model.

The Long View: Half a century in libraries | Editorial

With a legacy that reaches back to 1876, Library Journal is accustomed to big anniversaries. This month marks 50 years since a young man named John Berry III arrived at LJ to take on the position of assistant editor. That was May 25, 1964. His vision has been an integral part of the field ever since.

Law Profs Revolt after Aspen Casebook Tries to Get Around First Sale Doctrine

On May 5, a number of law professors around the country received an email from publisher Wolters Kluwer regarding the 11 books in the Aspen Casebook series they assign to their students. The email informed the educators that the casebook, which combines lessons about the legal system with documents from cases in which those principles were applied or set, would now be sold as a physical copy bundled with an ebook edition. There was just one catch: once the course was over, students would be required to ship their physical copies back to the publisher, rather than hanging onto them for reference or reselling them on the used book market.

To Empower Community Colleges, Empower Their Librarians | From the Bell Tower

Community colleges are increasingly important to America’s higher education system, but they are also a point of failure for too many students. The American Association for Community Colleges (AACC) is planning to change that with the rollout of a new guide—but where do librarians fit into the program?