November 16, 2017

Branching Out | Library by Design, Spring 2015

Mitchell Park Library and Community Center, Palo Alto, CA

Mitchell Park Library and Community Center, Palo Alto, CA

SOUTH

The new Northside Branch of the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library, Charlottesville, VA, opened on March 16. The 30,000 square foot, $11.8 million facility in what was a hardware supply store replaces its 16,000 square foot 1991 shopping center predecessor. The HBM Architects–designed library features a Maker space; conference rooms; a dedicated teen space with music production equipment; separate areas for adults and children; and a drive-through book return. (Hotline 4/6/15)

The San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) is embarking on a $75,000 relocation of its Latino collection to a larger space. Now situated on the sixth floor of SAPL’s Central ­Library, the collection will be moved to the former teen center on the first floor and enlarged as the Latino Collection and Resource Center. Working with the Latino Leadership for the Library (L3) Committee of the SAPL Foundation, the project got a kick-start with a $17,500 gift from the Alfredo ­Cisneros Del Moral Foundation. The new space, designed by Marmon | Mok Architecture, will incorporate areas to ­facilitate workshops, programming, lectures, and instructional activities. (Hotline 2/9/15)

NORTHEAST

Saturday, February 21, marked the completion of phase one of the renovation to the Johnson Building Central Library, Boston Public Library (BPL). Though work continues on the main floor, the second floor children’s library, teen zone, nonfiction collection, reference services, and community reading space are open. The children’s space includes a sensory learning wall to enhance the early literacy facet of the project, as well as the Story­Scape story time spot. The tween space, a first for a BPL branch, serves as a transition between the youngest patrons and their teen counterparts. Teen Central features a media room, a digital lab, diner-style booths, and collaborative work spaces. The $16.1 million project was designed by Boston firm William Rawn Associates, together with Consigli ­Construction. (Hotline 3/2/15)

Norwich University, Northfield, VT, broke ground in January for a major rehab to its 58,000 square foot 1993 Kreitzberg Library. The $6.5 million effort is part of a $100 million plan to upgrade several campus facilities. The work, designed by Jones Architecture and Gund Partnership, will include new workstations, group study spaces, high-tech classrooms, and a café. (Hotline 3/2/15)

MIDWEST

The Toledo–Lucas County Public Library is moving forward with its Oregon Branch expansion project, begun last August. The branch is gaining 3,700 square feet in the $3.5 million project, which includes $900,000 for furniture, equipment, and contingencies. The meeting room will be larger, and a collaboration space will be added. Also, both dedicated spaces for children and teens will be enhanced. The architectural firm behind the work is Holzheimer Bolek + Meehan (HBM Architects). (Hotline 3/9/15)

The 53,000 square foot Canton Public Library, MI, which opened in 1988, conducted an eight-week, $514,611 remodel, a major portion of which is aimed at compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The lobby and restrooms are the ­focus of that work. Under contractor Library Design Associates, this phase of the project will feature the installation of additional study carrels and a more accessible music collection, along with fresh tile and ­carpeting. (Hotline 2/9/15)

WEST

The new Nampa Public Library (NPL), ID, opened on March 13. The 62,000 square foot, $16.8 million structure replaces the expanded building NPL had occupied since 1966 and more than doubles its size. Part of the new Library Square revitalization project, NPL features a first-floor children’s section, a second-floor teen zone, six study rooms throughout the building, and furnishings equipped with electrical outlets, plus 24 new computers and an automated materials handling system care of a $380,000 donation from Micron Technology, Inc. The third floor includes an outdoor seating area. The library was designed by Babcock Design and FFA Interior Design. (Hotline 4/6/15)

After a protracted renovation and expansion that began in 2010, the Mitchell Park Library and Community Center (MPLCC), Palo Alto, CA, ­finally opened on December 6, 2014. The multiuse facility now measures 56,000 square feet, in a design by Group 4 Architecture and final construction management from Big D Pacific Builders; it cost roughly $45 million. Funding came in part from the 2008 Measure N, which approved support for multiple library construction efforts throughout the city, in addition to $1.4 million from the Palo Alto Library Foundation. MPLCC encompasses a large children’s area, a dedicated teen space, a computer training room, a 100-person program room, and quiet reading spaces, along with a half-court basket­ball area and a café. The environmentally friendly library targeted Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification. (Hotline 1/26/15)

Send information on groundbreakings and ongoing and completed building projects to blfox@mediasourceinc.com

This article was published in Library Journal's May 15, 2015 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Bette-Lee Fox About Bette-Lee Fox

Bette-Lee Fox (blfox@mediasourceinc.com) is Managing Editor, Library Journal.

Celebrating her 43rd year with Library Journal, Bette-Lee also edits LJ’s Video Reviews column, six times a year Romance column, and e-original Romance reviews, which post weekly as LJ Xpress Reviews.

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