November 21, 2017

Archives for November 2015

Public/Open Access: CHORUS and National Science Foundation (NSF) Announce Research Dissemination Agreement

From CHORUS: The new agreement is in accordance with the NSF public access plan, which was released on March 18, 2015. NSF’s public access plan is intended to accelerate the dissemination of fundamental research results that will advance the frontiers of knowledge and help ensure the nation’s future prosperity. [Clip] NSF will employ the CHORUS […]

Feedback: Letters to LJ, November 15, 2015 Issue

Sticking up for desk service, long live the MLIS, continuing the Downers Grove conversation, and more letters to the editor from the November 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Alaska: “‘This Book is Gay’: Wasilla Library Mulls Future of LGBT Sex-Ed Book”

UPDATE November 26 James Dawson criticises parents who attacked his LGBT guide for children (via The Guardian) From the Alaska Dispatch-News: A young-adult sex education book that sits on Wasilla Public Library’s juvenile nonfiction shelf has sparked calls to relocate the book — if not remove it altogether. “This Book is Gay” is a rainbow-covered […]

Retraction Watch and Center for Open Science Announce Partnership to Build Database of Article Retractions

From a Joint Announcement: The Center for Open Science (COS) and The Center For Scientific Integrity (CSI), the parent organization of Retraction Watch, announce a technology partnership to collaborate on creating a database of retractions on the Open Science Framework. The partnership supports each group’s mission to increase transparency and integrity in science and scientific […]

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Dennis Krieb named Illinois Academic Librarian of the Year; William J. Rozek appointed Chief Financial Officer for OCLC; Kelvin Watson promoted to Chief Innovation and Technology Officer, Queens Library, Jamaica, NY; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the November 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Make Your Own | Field Reports

Can I take this home? is a question I would hear every day while in the Hotspot at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s (FLP) Village of Arts and Humanities. The “thing” in question was a MaKey MaKey, and the answer was always, “No, but you can take home what you are plugging it into!” Working with youth aged seven to 18 years old we were creating computer-connected mazes with Play-Doh, homemade Dance Dance Revolution dance-pads using copper tape, and novel game controllers operated by licking ice cream.

You’re the Boss. Now What? | Collection Development: Building a Small Business, December 1, 2015

Between new technological options and the desire to return to handmade and local goods, there are plenty of opportunities for new and small businesses—and plenty to learn. These 25 resources combine the latest and lasting advice for new entrepreneurs.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Matthew Cook

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Matthew Cook, emerging technology librarian at the University of Oklahoma (OU) Libraries, Norman, OK. Cook, who earned a Master of Arts in philosophy with a focus on cognition, has brought a level of outside-the-box thinking to his work in the library. Among other innovations, he implemented the digital Sparq Labyrinth, a walking meditation tool within the library that helps stressed students unwind and recharge at exam time, for which he won the University of Oklahoma Libraries Innovator’s Award in 2014. Currently, Cook is developing a campus-wide indoor navigation app and the O.V.A.L. (Oklahoma Virtual Academic Laboratory) virtual reality interactive teaching system.

National Book Awards Honor Coates & More

On Wednesday, November 18, before the usual packed and glittering crowd at lower Manhattan’s Cipriani, the National Book Foundation awarded Ta-Nehisi Coates its National Book Award (NBA) for Nonfiction for Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau). That that award was hardly unexpected does not detract from its importance. Coates’s meditation on the African […]

Suit Convinces Eighth PL to Revise Meeting Room Policy to Allow Religion, Politics

A public library in Lawrence, MA., has changed its meeting room policy, eliminating restrictions against religious or political expression in that space, after the city settled a lawsuit brought by Liberty Counsel, a non-profit Christian organization that has championed a number of high-profile conservative political causes in recent years.