November 17, 2017

Archives for February 2016

Mind the RA Gap | BackTalk

The inconsistent treatment of readers’ advisory (RA) as a core service for adults in public libraries has led to inconsistent demand for quality RA education, which has further led to inconsistent service. Jennie Maas Flexner noted as far back as 1934 that the “need for specialized education is as evident in [readers’ advisory] work as in every other department of the library.” This is still true, and the need is still not being met. Two gaps prevent RA from being taught in a way that would make it the core public library service it should be.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Katie Chatas appointed to Columbus Metropolitan Library’s Board of Trustees; Jesse Montero promoted to Director, Brooklyn Public Library Central Library; Patrick Sweeney named Political Director at EveryLibrary; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the February 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

President Obama Announces Intent To Nominate Carla D. Hayden as Librarian of Congress

President Barack Obama announced on February 24 his intent to nominate Carla D. Hayden, CEO of the Enoch Pratt Free Library (EPFL) in Baltimore and 1995 LJ Librarian of the Year, as Librarian of Congress. In addition to leading EPFL since 1993, Hayden served as president of the American Library Association (ALA) from 2003–04 and has been on the National Library and Museum Services Board, which advises the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), since 2010. Hayden was also a member of the 2010 steering committee that guided the formation of the Digital Public Library of American (DPLA).

Feedback: Letters to LJ, February 15, 2016 Issue

We’re no saints, lingering in the library, signage that works, and more letters to editor from the February 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Trend Turnaround | Materials Survey 2016

LJ’s 2016 materials survey of public libraries nationwide was full of surprises, with long-standing trends suddenly turned on their heads.

NCSU Offers Social Media Archives Toolkit for Libraries

North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries recently debuted a free, web-based social media archives toolkit designed to help cultural heritage organizations develop social media collection strategies, gain knowledge of ways in which peer institutions are collecting similar content, understand current and potential uses of social media content by researchers, assess the legal and ethical implications of archiving this content, and develop techniques for enriching collections of social media content at minimal cost. Tools for building and enriching collections include NCSU’s Social Media Combine—which pre-assembles the open source Social Feed Manager, developed at George Washington University for Twitter data harvesting, and NCSU’s own open source Lentil program for Instagram—into a single package that can be deployed on Windows, OSX, and Linux computers.

Mellon Foundation Grants $1.2 Million to Hampshire College Library Redesign

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has issued a $1.2 million grant to remake the Harold F. Johnson Library at Hampshire College, Amherst, MA, as a Knowledge Commons—an integrated, centralized hub of content, tools, and academic support services. While the library’s transformation over the next four years looks to a brand new service model, it also continues the tradition of innovation on which the library was established some 50 years ago.

Tell the Truth, Tell It All: Surviving a Leadership Crisis | Leading from the Library

It is inevitable that leaders will say or do something to land themselves in hot water with their followers. Knowing how to respond to and learn from a leadership crisis is a valuable leadership skill.

Catching Up on Copyright with Kyle Courtney | Not Dead Yet

It’s been a while since I spoke with the inimitable Kyle K. Courtney, 2015 LJ Mover and Shaker, “Harvard Hero” (for his work on copyright), and the organizer of the Copyright First Responder program at Harvard, among many, many other roles. With Fair Use / Fair Dealing Week upon us (Feb. 22nd – 26th), it seems like a good time to see what developments have taken place in Kyle’s universe since last we chatted in 2013.

How To Talk Code | Digital Literacy

Last summer, Bloomberg BusinessWeek devoted an entire issue to “What Is Code?” a single article by Brooklyn-based writer and programmer Paul Ford. Ford’s breakdown of key concepts pulls back the curtain on the fundamentals of computer programming and makes a compelling argument that any smart person can learn the basics—and that the basics are worth learning even for those who aren’t planning to become professional coders. It is, in part, a case for coding as a new frontier in digital literacy. There’s a growing interest in this type of education among kids, teens, businesspeople, career changers, and the generally curious. And a growing number of public libraries are already responding to this need within their communities. Here’s a look at ways in which a few libraries have made their programs a success.