November 23, 2017

Archives for August 2016

CNN: “In Historic First, International Criminal Court Has Classified Destroying Cultural Artifacts as a War Crime”

From CNN: In a historic first, the International Criminal Court has classified destroying cultural artifacts as a war crime. It follows the trial of jihadist Ahmad al-Faqi al-Mahdi, who pleaded guilty Monday to destroying religious monuments in the ancient city of Timbuktu in Mali. [Clip] Mahdi, also known as “Abou Tourab,” was charged in March […]

Feedback: Letters to LJ, August 2016 Issue

A call for academic RA research, the unchanging lack of inclusion, and more letters to editor from the August 2016 issue of Library Journal.

We Talked About Failure | BackTalk

The Utah Library Association (ULA) dove headfirst into failure on February 19–20. Along with the Salt Lake City Public Library (SLCPL), ULA hosted Strikethrough: The Utah Library Association Failure Workshop. Billed as an interdisciplinary discussion of failure for librarians, it brought together librarians, medical doctors, and performance artists.

The Difference between Copyright Infringement and Plagiarism—and Why It Matters | Peer to Peer Review

Reading a recent article in the Atlantic and the subsequent comments, I was struck again by how much confusion there is among the public about the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement.

Gale Provides Analytics on Demand to EveryLibrary

On August 8 Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, announced that it will provide its Analytics on Demand (AOD) service to EveryLibrary, a national nonprofit political action committee for libraries, free of charge, so that it may better analyze data about library supporters in advance of the November elections and on an ongoing basis for future campaigns.

Write Here | Programming

Everyone has a book in them, it’s said. While Christopher Hitchens completed that phrase with “in most cases that’s where it should stay,” it doesn’t seem the public agrees. This is dramatically demonstrated by the expansion of U.S. publishing, as measured by Bowker, the U.S. issuer of ISBNs, the numbers that help track book sales. In 2002, Bowker issued 247,777. In 2012 (the most recent figures available), demand rose to 2,352,797—an increase of 2,105,020, or a whopping 849.5 percent.

Making Libraries Visible on the Web | The Digital Shift

In Library: An Unquiet History, historian and curatorial fellow for Harvard’s metaLAB Matthew Battles describes Melvil Dewey’s impatience with inefficiency in library work in the 1870s. “To Dewey, local interests and special needs were less important than the efficient movement of books into the hands of readers,” he writes. That crisp statement of purpose should be an inspiration to the current discussions around making library collections and programs visible and available on the web.

FOLIO: Reimagining Library Technology – Part 1

FOLIO, a community collaboration to develop an open source library services platform has taken shape. The FOLIO platform will support traditional resource management functionality but is open throughout and extensible at its core. By providing a platform for innovation, libraries and service providers can create applications and functionality that will deliver new and exciting services to libraries. Join this first webcast (in a series of 6) to learn about the FOLIO platform and the reimagining of library technology.
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The Research Journey | Office Hours

Since 2014, academic librarians from across the United States have gathered at Loyola Marymount University (LMU) in Los Angeles to be part of an immersive learning experience—the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL).

Bandwidth Blues: Satisfying an Insatiable Appetite for Connectivity | From the Bell Tower

What’s expensive to provide and it seems that there is never enough to go around on a college campus? There’s a reason your students are always complaining about your library’s Wi-Fi.