November 16, 2017

Librarians’ Picks | Library Design 2017

Furnishings of note from recent library projects

Alone in Lone Tree

The Lone Tree branch of Douglas County Libraries, CO, more than doubled in size with its new 2016 building. More space, more options. The high-sided Ziva Lounge Chairs provide patron privacy along with plug-in capability. In the middle of the bustling library, patrons can enjoy a bit of solitude. JSI Furniture, www.jsifurniture.com/jsi_product_ziva_ls_gallery.php

Expeditionary Fun

Each of the renovated or new branches of the St. Louis County Library includes a fun Discovery table in the children’s area. There are three activity tops to choose from—a LEGO table, a train track, or a light table—which can easily be swapped out. 3branch Product Design Solutions, www.3branch.com/discovery.html

Nestle for a Nap?

The new Hewitt Public Library, TX, has surprises around every corner. Nestled between stacks are lighted reading areas in which patrons can tuck away and enjoy a good book or a catnap. The Privée canopied lounge sofa bench is inviting, ensuring privacy and acoustic comfort. Swivel tables can be incorporated into the unit for a multipurpose surface to support one’s work. Borgo, borgo.com/corporate/privee

My Private Hideaway

Even in a 3,500 square foot room in the Florida Institute of Technology’s Evans Library, a bit of serenity is now possible. In such a large open space, Eero Style Ball Chairs offer just the seclusion students need for study and contemplation. The chairs are so popular that students have asked if they can reserve them. Novì Décor, www.novidecor.com

Sitting/Storage Solutions

The bench seating at the Ardmore Library, PA, is colorful, comfortable, and inviting. At this member of the Lower Merion Library System, children use the padded benches during story time and for play in the newly built soft play area. The bench lifts up, providing ample storage, which allows for easy and quick cleanup. Worden, www.wordencompany.com

Hidden Treasures

The overarching theme at the Haymarket Gainesville Community Library, VA, is its rural setting. This wooden structure/mural features educational manipulative structures at the bottom. While parents are at the checkout area, the children are within sight and happily engaged. RRMM Lukmire was the architect and designer, while manufacture and installation fell to TMC Furniture-TMCkids. TMC Furniture, www/tmcfurniture.com/product-kids

Swooping in on Comfort

Students using the Gottesman Library, Yeshiva University, New York, can form their own seating patterns with Brian Kane’s Swoop lounge furniture. The chairs come as either molded plywood with metal legs, in a variety of fabrics, or fully upholstered lightweight sectional units. Herman Miller, www.hermanmiller.com

Bedazzling Sky Show

The children’s area at the Grant’s View Branch of the St. Louis County Library spotlights an array of color-changing pendant luminary LED lights. Square and linear, they feature white sandblasted acrylic diffusers hand fabricated with mitered corners for a “dazzling” addition to any space. 3G Lighting, www.3glighting.com

All Aboard for Learning

The Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, has Ready for Kindergarten spaces at many of its branches and the recently reimagined Main Library. Each area houses a custom-designed miniature school bus as a place where youngsters and their caregivers can engage in kindergarten readiness. The buses also encourage free play and conversation. Conte Custom, www.contecustom.com

Contributors

Melissa Anciaux, Douglas County Libraries, CO

Waynette Ditto, Director of Library Services, Hewitt Public Library, TX

Paul Glassman, Director of University Libraries, Yeshiva University, New York

Jane Quin, Head Librarian, Ardmore Library, PA

Jessica Scalph, Library Administrator, Haymarket Gainesville Community Library, VA

Lauren Striebel, Special Projects Analyst, St. Louis County Library

Angela Taylor, Director, Enabling Infrastructure, Evans Library, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne

Ben Zenitsky, Marketing & Communications Specialist, Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH

This article was published in Library Journal's May 15, 2017 issue. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

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