December 10, 2017

Uncommon Common Spaces | Year in Architecture 2017


Established in 1974 and in its current Town Center location since 1995, the Cozby Library
and Community Commons, Coppell, TX, gained a 4,270 square foot addition, the renovation of
the existing 28,000 square feet, extra parking, and reconfiguration of the entrance and exits. It also houses a business center, additional study rooms and meeting spaces, and a drive-through book return. CREDITS: Hidell and Associates Architects, architect; Patrick Coulie, photo.

 


Representing the largest construction effort since the school was founded in 1925, the $117 million Patricia R. Guerrieri Academic Commons, Salisbury University, MD, consolidates academic support programs with a state-of-the-art library, classrooms, a café, and the Nabb Research Center. CREDITS: Sasaki Associates, Ayers Saint Gross, architects; ©Jeremy Bittermann, photo.

 

The new Havre de Grace Branch of the Harford County Public Library, MD, encompasses 21,000 square feet in this coastline city. Among the amenities is the second-floor Business Center with state-of-the-art technology in a glass-walled space. CREDITS: Manns Woodward Studios, architects; Robert Creamer, photo.

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Bette-Lee Fox About Bette-Lee Fox

Bette-Lee Fox (blfox@mediasourceinc.com) is Managing Editor, Library Journal.

Celebrating her 46th year with Library Journal, Bette-Lee also edits LJ’s Video Reviews column, six times a year Romance column, and e-original Romance reviews, which post weekly as LJ Xpress Reviews.

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