December 16, 2017

Academic Libraries

2017 ACRL/NY Symposium: The Mission

The 2017 ACRL/NY (Greater New York Metropolitan Area Chapter of Association of College and Research Libraries) Symposium, held on December 1 at Baruch College in Manhattan, led off with an interesting proposition: that thinking creatively about access—and how libraries can provide the widest range of access now and into the future—can offer a new kind of framework for shaping collections.

Textbook Affordability: What’s Happening in Your State | From the Bell Tower

The good news is that more academic librarians are leading textbook affordability and open educational resources initiatives at their institutions. What if we could do even more good work with statewide efforts? Fortunately, there are some good models to lead the way.

ITHAKA Next Wave Conference Focuses on Higher Ed Challenges

Speakers at ITHAKA’s The Next Wave conference, held at New York’s Roosevelt Hotel on November 29, made the case for work that colleges and universities must take on if they want to improve national educational attainment. The conference, “Innovating and Adapting to Address Today’s Higher Education Challenges,” looked at new approaches from a variety of angles, from administration to the classroom to research, with alignment between leadership and the library given particular attention.

SJSU-Led Team Explores Blockchain in Libraries

A group led by San Jose State University iSchool (SJSU) Director Sandra Hirsh and SJSU lecturer Susan Alman is exploring how the library field could use blockchain, the open source, secure distributed database system originally developed to validate and record Bitcoin cryptocurrency transactions. Funded with a recent $100,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), SJSU is planning an online Library 2.0 conference on the topic on June 7, 2018, and a Blockchain National Forum in mid-2018.

Academic Library Data | Year in Architecture 2017

The data for academic new buildings and renovations featured in LJ’s Year in Architecture 2017.

LJ’s Top Trends in Library Architecture | Year in Architecture 2017

As demonstrated in this year’s 82 building projects, completed between July 1, 2016, and June 30, 2017, academic and public institutions are now regarded as places of community, of gathering, and of collaboration, even as reading remains in play. From Long Beach’s Michelle Obama Neighborhood Library to Harvard University’s Cabot Science Library, LJ explores some of the top trends in library architecture this year.

Gearing Up for Change in Charleston

This year’s Charleston Conference, held from November 6–10, addressed the theme “What’s Past Is Prologue.” As always, the conference was too packed with content for a single editor to do more than dip into a small sample. However, some commonalities did emerge across the sessions attended.

Faculty and Archives Partner on MIT and Slavery Project

One of the newest courses on offer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is “MIT and Slavery,” collaboratively taught by Steven Craig Wilder, Barton L. Weller Professor of History, and Nora Murphy, archivist for reference, outreach, and instruction. The undergraduate class will focus on researching MIT’s historical ties to slavery and the slave trade, as well as the role the slave economy played in other American engineering and science institutions.

SPONSORED CONTENT

University of Michigan’s Rachel Vacek Has Solutions for Librarians

Rachel Vacek is Head of Design and Discovery, a department of twelve within the sixty-five person Library Information Technology division at the University of Michigan. In this interview, Vacek shares her approach to excellent user experience in the library.

Five Trends Changing Higher Education That Librarians Need to Watch | From the Bell Tower

Higher education has a reputation for staying the same. That’s never been more of a myth than right now. Some of the changes have little impact on academic librarians. Others require more of our attention.