April 15, 2014

Ian Chant

About Ian Chant

Ian Chant is the Associate News Editor of LJ.

OSU Libraries Offer Open Access Etextbooks to Students

OSU Valley Library

Oregon State University (OSU) is helping faculty produce their own open access textbooks for courses. The university press, an arm of the OSU libraries, is starting work on a series of open source e-textbooks that officials hope will ease the rising textbook costs that are a consistent cause of student complaints. To make the etextbook program work, the library and press are partnering with OSU’s Ecampus program, which administers distance and online learning programs for the college.

Pew/Gates Foundations’ Library Studies Close with Look at User Engagement

Pew: More Patrons Using Mobile Devices to Access Library Websites

The last of a series of Pew Research Center studies examining the changing face of library service in the 21st century was released in March, offering a look at library use that breaks Americans down into nine different groups of library users. The report, “From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers,” caps three years of Pew research on libraries funded by the Gates Foundation, and looks to identify what users—and some non-users—value about library service, and where they may see room for improvement.

Penguin Random House Releases First Annual Report Following Merger

Penguin Random House Logo

Nine months after the merger of two of the biggest names in the publishing world, stakeholders and industry watchers may have their first good idea of what to expect from the newly created book giant Penguin Random House (PRH). The company released the results of its 2013 fiscal year, and the details paint a rosy picture for investors, even while executives say there is a lot of work left to be done merging the former Penguin and Random House business operations.

Ryan’s Proposed 2015 Budget Would Eliminate IMLS

On April 1, House Budget Committee chair Paul Ryan (R-WI) released his budget proposal for the fiscal year 2015. It would cut five trillion dollars from federal balance sheets in the next decade by making significant cuts to spending on initiatives like Medicare and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, more commonly known as food stamps. Among librarians, though, the most controversial cost-saving measure proposed in the Ryan budget might be its elimination of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) entirely, cutting millions in grants to libraries around the country.

Q&A: Cengage Learning CEO Michael Hansen on Coming Out of Bankruptcy

Michael Hansen - Headshot

Cengage Learning announced today that it has emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy, having completed its financial restructuring, eliminating approximately $4 billion in funded debt and securing $1.75 billion in exit financing. LJ caught up with Michael Hansen, Chief Executive Officer of Cengage Learning, to find out what this means and what’s next for the company.

New Archive Traces Oregon’s Brewing History from Farm to Keg

Portland Hops Pickers

With more than 200 breweries operating in the state, beer is big business in Oregon. But the Beaver State’s relationship with beer starts before the brewing process and reaches into the very soil. In addition to its profusion of breweries, Oregon is the breadbasket of the world’s beer industry, supplying hops—the flavorful flower that gives beer its bitter bite—to brewers around the world. Now, Oregon State University (OSU) is making a place for the state’s storied history in the brewing world at the newly minted Oregon Hops & Brewing Archive (OHBA).

Seed Library Takes Root at Dalhousie University – Q&A With Coordinator Jolene Reid

Dalhousie Seed Library

At Nova Scotia’s Dalhousie University, the MacRae Library, which serves students and faculty in the school’s agricultural programs, has assembled a new collection: one of the seeds that have shaped the region’s farming history. While the collection is currently housed in a single repurposed card catalog, librarian Jolene Reid has high hopes that the archive will take root.

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Karen Lauritsen

Movers2014webBigLauritsenb

In this first of an interview series sponsored by SAGE, LJ goes in depth with this year’s Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, delving into just how and why they pulled off the projects that brought them recognition as innovators, change agents, and more. Karen Lauritsen was chosen as one of this year’s Tech Leaders for her work as Communications & Public Programs Coordinator at the Robert E. Kennedy Library of California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.

Developing Collections and Serving Diversity | PLA 2014

PLA 2014 conference logo

The Public Library Association (PLA) Conference comes around every other year, but that long wait may make it all the more special to attendees, many of whom described the biennial gathering as their favorite library conference. Held in Indianapolis, this year’s conference brought together librarians, publishers, authors, and vendors for three days of programming with a focus on issues like collection development, finding partners to help increase the impact of programs, and reaching out to patrons, especially those in underserved communities.

ALA and Freedom to Read Foundation File Briefs in Two Lawsuits

Freedom To Read Foundation

The first weeks of March were busy for litigation in the library world as the American Library Association (ALA) and Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF) weighed in on a pair of cases headed to the Supreme Court. While neither impacts libraries directly, both have the potential to be big decisions that shape precedent on freedom of speech and privacy rights.