April 15, 2014

Measuring the Value of Journals | Periodicals Price Survey 2014

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Journal price data is important for budget management processes, but price alone is not the sole factor determining value. Some metrics, like Impact Factor, have become important in assessing value, and similar value metrics will only increase in importance in the future. The implementation of the Counter 4 during 2014 will expand the availability of usage data from journals, databases, ebooks, and multimedia to support better decision-making. Building upon COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) and working with the digital object identifier (DOI) and ORCID (open researcher and contributor ID) identifier, the PIRUS (Publisher and Institutional Repository Usage Statistics) Code of Practice is designed to provide usage data at the individual article level, consolidating usage across platforms.

Steps Down the Evolutionary Road | Periodicals Price Survey 2014

The birth of the World Wide Web 25 years ago was the big bang event that spurred more change in the serials and scholarly publishing world than seen in the century that preceded it. Since that time, we have rapidly evolved from the print world to that of e-journals, e-journal packages, and open access (OA). But in the serials ecosystem, as in nature, not all things evolve at the same rate, and the cumulative impact of subtle steps can bring about profound change over time. Despite some notable events, such as the purchase of Mendeley by Elsevier, the sale of Springer to BC Partners, and the launch of SCOAP 3, there was no major disruption in the serials world during 2013.

Library People News from Princeton U. to Fullerton, CA

Stephen Abram joins the board of Librarians Without Borders; Robert Wolven wins 2014 Melvil Dewey Medal; Mindy Hackner is named Director, North Adams Public Library, MA; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the April 1, 2014, issue of Library Journal.

Feedback on Literacy, Library Horror Stories, and More

Letters to the editor from LJ’s April 1, 2014, issue address Netflix versus net neutrality, the success of library literacy initiatives, and more on the evergreen subject of weeding, plus much more.

Chicago Leads Pack of Early Candidates for Obama Presidential Library

For over a year now, speculation has been swirling about who will throw their hats in the ring to host the future Obama Presidential Library. The city of Chicago—the Obamas’ pre-presidential hometown—is the obvious choice, but not the only contender. The University of Hawaii at Honolulu, near the President’s childhood home, and New York City’s Columbia University, the President’s alma mater, are also likely bidders.

Radical Home Economics | Programs That Pop

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Radical Home Economics revives homemaking skills for adults. In this hands-on series, participants work together to make things that are meaningful in their everyday lives. RHE is a fresh and exciting take on one of the library’s oldest and most fundamental purposes. The real power behind lending books is the conviction that you can be your own expert. Maker programming shares this purpose. In a culture where everything is increasingly commoditized and prepackaged, access to this foundational library value is increasingly rare, valuable, and transformative.

Seattle Aims to Become Second American City of Literature

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Seattle, regularly a contender for the title of most literate city in the United States by Central Connecticut State University’s annual ranking, is doubling down on its reputation as a book-loving burg. This March, the city submitted its application for designation as a UNESCO City of Literature, a bid that would make Seattle the second city in the United States and the eighth city in the world to receive the title.

New Santa Clara Library Branch, Long Stymied by Funding Dispute, Sees Happy Ending

Northside library branch Santa Clara, CA

Members of the Santa Clara, CA, library community remain in a celebratory mood this week after finally getting the green light to resume work on the Northside Branch Library. The nearly finished building previously sat untouched for eight months while millions of dollars needed to complete the work remained frozen by a bureaucratic snarl, threatening to permanently close the Northside Library before it even opened.

Hachette Hot Reads: Summer Fun with Grand Central, Little Brown & More

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Spring has sprung, summer is on its way, and here’s your chance to find out about hot books you’ll want to read this summer. Author Susie Jane Gilman and Grand Central Publishing’s Senior Editor Helen Atsma will discuss Susie’s upcoming novel THE ICE CREAM QUEEN OF ORCHARD STREET, a debut novel following Susie’s hilarious nonfiction. In addition, National Book Award finalist Josh Ferris will join with his editor, Little, Brown’s Senior Vice President and Publisher Reagan Arthur, to discuss Josh’s upcoming novel, TO RISE AGAIN AT A DECENT HOUR. In addition, Hachette’s Adult Library Marketing Team—Ali Coughlin, Melissa Nicholas and Karen Torres—will feature more of Hachette’s hot reads. Moderated by LJ’s Prepub Alert editor, Barbara Hoffert. Register Now!

Open Access as Undergraduate Pedagogy | Backtalk

Open Access (OA) is usually associated with academic scholarship and its relationship to the “paywall” by proponents and critics alike. It is essential to consider the question of OA not only in terms of its impact on publishers and scholars, but in terms of its teaching and learning potential for students and educators.