October 28, 2016

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Stephanie J. Coakley named Executive Director, Pequot Library, Southport, CT; Toyin Falola serve as Library of Congress Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South; Lisa Rosinsky chosen as Associates of Boston Public Library Writer-in-Residence; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the October 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

High School Diplomas @ the Public Library


Thursday, November 10th, 2016, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Our panelists will share why they chose the program and what it’s meant in terms of community partnerships, exposure, demonstrating outcomes, etc. They will also give insight into the day-to-day program operations, share best practices and tell a tale or two about how this program has benefitted the lives of their COHS students and graduates.
Register Now!

Break the Cycle with Evidence-based Analytics and Selection


Wednesday, November 9th, 2016, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
This webinar will not only discuss how to improve decisions when purchasing new items, but also how to make existing collections work harder. Until recently, many libraries would respond to the high volume of dead items in their collections through weeding alone. Our panel will discuss the use of an evidence-based transfer process to move dead items to new locations where there is a proven demand, therefore offering an item every chance to circulate before it is removed from the collection.
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Feedback: Letters to LJ, October 1, 2016 Issue

Aligning with Black Lives Matter?, all sides weigh in on Sci-Hub, keeping fair use out of court, and more letters to editor from the October 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Newsprint in Black | Product Spotlight


Beginning with the publication of Freedom’s Journal by Samuel Cornish and John Brown Russwurm in 1827, U.S. newspapers and periodicals written and distributed by African American journalists and publishers in the 19th and 20th centuries have played a vital role in giving voice to black communities, while chronicling and ultimately preserving history from the perspective of those communities. This product spotlight showcases subscription databases with extensive historic black newspaper collections, as well as a selection of free resources made available by the Library of Congress (LC), the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and other institutions.

I Can’t Hear You…but I’m Still Listening | BackTalk


As adults, we might cover our ears with our hands at a loud blast or use headphones or earbuds to curate the sounds we want to enter our eardrums, but sticking our fingers in our ears and yelling, “I can’t hear you!” is usually frowned upon. I’m not proud to say that at a recent team meeting, I did just that. Of course, I did so in jest, but it got me thinking about how easy it is to dismiss ideas that I don’t want to hear.

A Place to Belong, A Place That Belongs | 2016 Designing Libraries Conference Report


The fifth annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century conference, held at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta, spotlighted “Innovations with Impact,” and featured voices from the design, library, and education worlds. The conference brought together about 250 practitioners from across the world.

News Briefs for October 1, 2016

The Arizona State Capitol launches the Arizona State Knowledge Center; IMLS issues Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program and Native American Library Services Enhancement Grants; Video Veracity and Serendipity Films receive an NEH award to help complete “Free for All: Inside the Public Library”; and more News in Brief from the October 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Thinking Big in Big Sky Country | Design Institute Design Challenges | Library by Design, Fall 2016


Susan F. Gregory, director of the Bozeman Public Library, MT, welcomed attendees of LJ’s Design Institute (DI) to the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Silver-certified building this May. Opened in 2006, the facility is at once both warmly rustic, clearly inspired by its spectacular mountain setting, and right on trend with the best of national library design. It offers open sight lines, a lofty roof with metal accents, lots of glass (balanced by plenty of wood), hands-on tech, and spaces for people inside and out, making it the perfect setting for attendees to plan the right library for their own communities.

Why LC Should Drop Illegal Aliens | BackTalk


The Library of Congress (LC) sparked debate recently when it announced that it would no longer use the term illegal aliens as a subject heading. The library maintains that the phrase has become “pejorative,” a sentiment echoed by social justice projects such as Race Forward’s Drop the I-Word campaign. However, Republican lawmakers who introduced legislation to force the library to keep the term argue that the LC’s subject headings (LCSH) should be consistent with U.S. Code.