July 29, 2016

Making the Advocacy Decision

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Library trustees—whether elected or appointed—have the fiduciary responsibility to ensure that the library has the resources to provide the programs and services the community wants.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, July 2016 Issue

Boosting Orlando, art large and small, an elephant in the (library) room, and more letters to editor from the July, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Pure Escapism | Programs That Pop

IT’S A LOCK (Clockwise from top l.): Kids create the puzzles for the library escape room; Morton-James PL director Rasmus Thoegersen made up as a zombie; and all the zombies get ready for their moment

What do you do with an old storage room? With the help of a grant, around 40 kids, four months, and a lot of hard work and creativity, the Morton-James Public Library was able to transform a nondescript storage area into a real-life immersive puzzle game—­Nebraska City’s first escape room (and the first escape room in the world built by kids, as far as we can tell).

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Michael Doylen named Interim Associate Vice Provost and Director of Libraries at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Andrea Ingmire appointed director of Peter White Public Library, Marquette, MI; Nandita S. Mani to become Director of Health Sciences Library and Associate University Librarian for the Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the July 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Protecting Patron Privacy

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Recently, I was teaching a privacy class for librarians, and the topic turned to the privacy versus convenience trade-off—the occasional annoyances of using privacy-enhancing technologies online. An audience member laid out what she felt I was asking of the group. “You’re telling us to start selling granola when everyone else is running a candy store.”

Product Sourcebook | Library by Design, Spring 2016

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With so many Americans sitting for hours at work, and so many studies showing that inactivity is problematic to health outcomes, incorporating furniture and fixtures that encourage fitness and physical activity into the library is a way to help patrons in the here and now and let them try out options for future home use.

As Vote Approaches, Critics of Brooklyn Library Sale Abound

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Update: On July 7, Supreme Court Justice Dawn Jiminez-Salta ruled against Love Brooklyn Libraries, Inc.’s challenge to the Brooklyn Heights Branch sale and development. The project will proceed as planned.

The controversial sale of Brooklyn Public Library’s (BPL) Brooklyn Heights branch to a New York real estate development group remains up in the air. The latest speed bump in the library’s sale, which was proposed by BPL, is a report suggesting the library system is getting a raw deal on the real estate, which is situated in one of the borough’s poshest neighborhoods.

Librarians’ Picks | Library by Design, Spring 2016

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The latest designs in furnishings and fixtures add punch and patron interest to building projects. How many would work in your library?

Local Supports Local | Sustainability

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Empower. Engage. Energize. These three words describe the relationship between a sustainable library and its users. It’s a two-way street: a library can empower patrons to do good things by engaging with them to understand their aspirations. A community can feel the authentic interest a library has in being a part of that community’s conversations, whether by being at the table or convening “the table” to find community-based solutions.

Connecting with Your Community: Finding and Serving Patrons in New Spaces

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Thursday, July 21st, 2016, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Join us to hear from representatives of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, a large urban library with 40 branches across the county, and a staff member from the Central Library Consortium representing individual member libraries from Central Ohio, as they share how their libraries have successfully connected with users in new spaces. Whether your library is actively shifting the way services are offered, looking for new ways to partner with other community organizations, or trying to evaluate the success of recent changes, you’ll take away insights from other forward-thinking public libraries and the experience they have had.
Register Now!