May 2, 2016

Feedback: Letters to LJ, April 15, 2016 Issue

Let libraries be “libraries,” the Tyranny of Positivity, “double reading,” and more letters to editor from the April 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

English as a Library Language

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Thursday, May 26th, 2016, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Join this webcast to learn how innovative libraries of all sizes are meeting their patrons’ need for not only formal instruction and self-directed learning tools, but underserved niches that make an immediate, practical difference.
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Research in the Real World

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Tuesday, May 17th, 2016, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM ET / 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT
In this webinar, find out how best to get your existing collections used, not just for study, but to inform the real-world decisions of current and former students; how to acquire the right resources to get new actionable research into the hands of those who need it; and how to help your faculty get their scholarly publications noticed by the practitioners, consultants, and other influencers who can ensure their discoveries are widely used and understood.
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LA Archives Have Their Own TV Show

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In Los Angeles, anyone can be a star—even a library collection. The story of Lost LA, which draws on a Los Angeles library consortium’s local collections, proves that with the right tools (and a willingness to collaborate), libraries can reach an even wider audience.

Mentorship 101 | On the Job

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It’s easy to find advice on how to mentor a Millennial, but what if you are a Millennial, and you are the mentor? It’s bound to start happening. As of 2015, Millennials make up the largest proportion of the workforce. The oldest members of that generation are turning 34 and moving into management positions. Those of us who have moved into management have had help, and we should send the ladder back down.

Preschool STEM Lab | Field Reports

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Children are naturally curious about the world around them. Science programs and activities are a great way to capture their interest and encourage the development of early literacy skills. Many science activities and materials are easy to incorporate into library programs; you may find that you’re already including elements that increase STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) knowledge, for example, talking about color mixing or identifying and playing with shapes.

SPONSORED CONTENT

Demand-Driven Acquisition Goes Seamless

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As a content workflow consultant, it’s Sharon Palchak’s job to keep turnaways—not being allowed access to a journal—to a minimum. One way in which she’s able to do this is to help libraries set up their demand-driven acquisition (DDA) program. Although it’s often used in conjunction with other acquisition models, like subscriptions and firm orders, DDA […]

Word of Mouth | Language Learning

ENGAGING ENGLISH (Clockwise from top l.): New Americans Corner in Nashville Public Library’s (NPL) Southeast Branch;  Nashville patron shows off her new library card; ready to write at NPL; NPL adult literacy coordinator Megan Godbey (l.) offers computer help; Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s Let’s Speak English group

Programming that supports English-language learning (ELL) is not new in the world of public libraries. Kenneth English, associate director of adult learning centers at the New York Public Library (NYPL), has seen “photos and notices from around 1920 promoting classes in Manhattan’s Lower East Side immigrant neighborhoods.” While ELL programming has existed for nearly 100 years, modern libraries continue to update their offerings to fit the needs of their communities. Innovative and traditional projects that are responsive to demographic shifts and capitalize on local people power are key to best serving library customers working on their English-language skills.

BEA, Back In Chicago | BEA Preview 2016

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After seven years in New York, BookExpo America (BEA) heads to Chicago’s ­McCormick Place, where it will run from Wednesday though Friday, May 11–13. With a focus on BEA’s new partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Library Insights track will feature sessions by Libraries Transform: ALA@BEA, which is sponsored by Libraries Transform, ALA’s national public awareness campaign, and digital provider OverDrive. Also added to the 2016 schedule are tracks on children’s publishing and self-publishing, two of the hottest segments in the industry today. And, of course, there will be plenty of books to pick up and author signings to attend.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Cheryl LaGuardia awarded the 2016 Isadore Gilbert Mudge Award; Bridget Quinn-Carey appointed CEO of Hartford Public Library, CT; Jacqueline Solis now Director of Research and Instructional Services at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Library; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the March 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.