October 21, 2014

Molly McArdle

About Molly McArdle

Molly McArdle (mmcardle@mediasourceinc.com, @mollitudo on Twitter) is Assistant Editor, Library Journal Book Review. She also manages the Library Journal tumblr.

Super Crips and Gay Dads: Avoiding Stereotypes in Video Collections | ALA 2013

An ALA program tackled issues of building a responsible film collection that portrays minority communities (native, black, queer, and disabled Americans) in responsible, respectful ways.

“Whose Table?”: On Libraries and Race | ALA 2013

Sunday morning’s “In Visibility: Race and Libraries” was a crash course in sociology and libraries, taught by Todd Homna, assistant professor of Asian American Studies at Pitzer College and a former ALA Spectrum Scholar. Sponsored by ALA’s Office for Diversity and the Spectrum Scholars Program, asked the question: “Where do we locate race in relation to librarianship?”

Readers’ Advisory Panels Look at Genre and Marketing | ALA 2013

Reference and User Services Association (RUSA)-sponsored panel, “Beyond Genre: Exploring the Perception, Uses, and Misuses of Genre by Readers, Writers, and Librarians” attracts a large crowd, eager for discussion.

Alice Walker Wore Purple | ALA 2013

Alice Walker wore purple.
It was not the last official day of the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Chicago, but the McCormick Center’s auditorium had a kind of concluding air about it. (Perhaps it was the number of librarians carting luggage up and down the halls.) Eva Poole, President of the Public Library Association (PLA), introduced Monday’s midmorning speaker. The audience settled into its seats.
When she arrived at the podium, she sighed. “I’m so glad to see you.”

Illusion and Empathy in Science Fiction | ALA 2013

“The mixing of factual and counterfactual is not singular to sci fi and fantasy,” Timothy Zahn (“Thrawn Trilogy”) began. Zahn and Brandon Sanderson (“Mistborn”), Cory Doctorow (Homeland), David Brin (“Uplift”), Elizabeth Bear (Shattered Pillars), and John Scalzi (“Old Man’s War”) were charged with talking about the probable and improbable in science fiction (and, to a certain extent, in fantasy too). Organized by the Library and Information Technology Association and with help from Tor, the Saturday, June 28 panel was packed.

The Library Is Open: A Look at Librarians and Tumblr

The Library Is Open: A Look at Librarians and Tumblr

What makes library Tumblrs different from your run-of-the-mill library blogs is that they can take advantage of a built-in community with built-in readers. If a Wordpress or Blogspot blog is an island, Tumblr blogs are a city. Many librarians were initially attracted to Tumblr for the same reasons nonlibrarians were—ease of use, social features, the cool factor. But, once they arrived, they began to run into each other, then to talk to with one another, and finally to understand themselves as a community. The portmanteau Tumblarians—meaning “Tumblr librarians”—was coined and a subculture born.

Getting Reacquainted with Fiction | Library Journal’s Day of Dialog

Getting Reacquainted with Fiction | Library Journal’s Day of Dialog

Library Journal’s 2013 Day of Dialog ended with a table lined with familiar faces: Amy Tan, with her first novel for adults since 2005′s Saving Fish from Drowning; Richard North Patterson, with a work narrated by a 22-year-old woman; Allan Gurganus, with his first book in 16 years; prolific critic Caleb Crain, with his first ever novel (though second book); Al Lamanda, with Sunrise (Gale Cengage, Aug.), the follow up to his Edgar-nominated Sunset; and of course Library Journal‘s own Barbara Hoffert as moderator.

Time Will Tell: Librarians on Yahoo’s Acquisition of Tumblr

Time Will Tell: Librarians on Yahoo’s Acquisition of Tumblr

Perhaps what’s most noteworthy about the Tumblr library community’s reaction to the blogging service’s purchase by web behemoth (and, well, dinosaur) Yahoo is the lack of one. Yahoo, which announced the deal on its own Tumblr blog with a kind-of-awkward gif, purchased Tumblr for $1.1 billion and promised “not to screw it up.” When asked [...]

Burlesque, Fairies, and The Rozz-Tox Manifesto | What We’re Reading

Burlesque, Fairies, and The Rozz-Tox Manifesto | What We’re Reading

This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffers are reading risqué histories and local ones, media criticism and discussions of gender, and oh, yes, a few novels here and there.

Steve Jobs, Harry Houdini, and Beyoncé | What We’re Reading

Steve Jobs, Harry Houdini, and Beyoncé | What We’re Reading

This week, Library Journal and School Library Journal staffers are dipping into some classics (both new and old) of the horror genre, taking behind-the-scenes looks at today’s technology, and looking at historical figures with new eyes.