April 16, 2015

Meredith Schwartz

About Meredith Schwartz

Meredith Schwartz (mschwartz@mediasourceinc.com) is Senior Editor, News and Features of Library Journal.

One Book Online | One Cool Thing

ljx150301webCoolThing

One Book, One Community programs are, of course, a staple of public library adult programming. In “One Book, Well Done,” we offered a look at what makes a successful program; in the inaugural One Cool Thing column LJ visited a variation on the theme, the self-published One Book read The ­Slender Poe, from Sacramento Public Library, CA. Now, another twist: in February, the Chicago Public Library (CPL) launched its One Book, One Chicago (OBOC) Online, becoming, it says, the first public library in the nation to offer free, in-browser, social reading of a full novel.

EBSCO Buys YBP

EBSCO logo

EBSCO Information Services has acquired YBP Library Services from Baker & Taylor, the company announced on February 20. YBP specializes in delivering shelf-ready books in both print and electronic forms to the academic library market, with more than 12 million titles in its Global Online Bibliographic Information (GOBI), including more than one million digital titles. […]

Conference on the Ice | ALA Midwinter 2015

airplane

While the American Library Association (ALA) conferences held in Chicago commonly see some of the highest attendance thanks to the association’s hometown’s central location, winter weather hitting Sunday of this year’s Midwinter made that something of a mixed blessing—more than 19 inches of snow between Saturday night and Monday morning. While many locals stayed home (and perhaps watched the Super Bowl) and a few out-of-towners were able to beat the storm by departing early, many librarians and vendors were snowed in. Some 1,500 flights were cancelled arriving and departing Chicago’s airports on Sunday and Monday, forcing them to stay one, two, or even three days longer than originally intended—including much of the LJ staff.

Opinion | From Vicious to Virtuous: The collapse of U.K. libraries and unbreaking the cycle of library support

Earlier this month, the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA) released its annual statistics on library use in the U.K. CIPFA found that the number of patrons borrowing books from U.K. libraries has halved since 1997. This isn’t a surprise to anyone who has been following the ongoing financial crisis that’s engulfed those public libraries across the pond. It demonstrates what happens to libraries when they’re not supported by the communities they serve.

The Off-Site Librarian | One Cool Thing

ON THE TOWN A security camera “captures” a young patron at play (l.); the 100-year-old building 
now stands for library service

When one of the bookmobiles at the Fort Vancouver Regional Library (FVRL), WA, wore out, spending a quarter of a million dollars to buy a new one was not an option. Yet patrons in remote, rural locations in Clark County still needed library service. The innovative solution was the Yacolt Library Express (YLE): a building that is open to the public nearly 70 hours a week, yet staff only spend about ten hours there during the same period.

Making More from Less: Data Driven Alchemy at the Charleston Conference

Charleston_conference_logosquare

The Charleston Conference felt bigger than ever this year, with multiple attendees in the halls and elevators commenting on the profusion of programs at multiple venues, the standing room only grounds for popular breakout sessions, and the fact that they could no longer count on seeing everyone they know among the other attendees in the course of the conference. It is equally impossible to see even a fraction of the many compelling programs presented during the event; below is only our impression from the handful we could personally attend.

1,000 Words | Insights and Outcomes

GET GRAPHIC: Ad/lib's clean look practices what it preaches

We’re all familiar with the old saying that a picture is worth 1,000 words. But when it comes to communication with our patrons, whether existing or potential, many in libraryland are more comfortable crafting the 1,000 words than the graphics to sit alongside—or replace—them.

Chattanooga Library Board Responds to Audit’s Allegations

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Last week the board of the Chattanooga Public Library (TN) responded to a city audit released in late August, which criticized Library Director and LJ librarian of the year Corinne Hill and top staffers for receiving excess travel reimbursements (since repaid), and stated that two employees have been reported to the state for suspected fraud for taking paid speaking and consultant jobs on library time.

LJ Names Associate News Editor

Lisa Peet

Lisa Peet has taken over as Library Journal’s Associate News Editor, effective September 2. A graduate of Pratt Institute’s Masters in Library and Information Science program, Peet previously served as editor and researcher at the Darwin Manuscripts Project at the American Museum of Natural History.

The Organized Librarian: An Interview with Daniel J. Levitin

Daniel J. Levitin

Daniel J. Levitin, author of The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload (Aug., Dutton) and the James McGill Professor of Psychology and Music at McGill University, Montreal, where he also holds appointments in the Program in Behavioural Neuroscience, The School of Computer Science, and the Faculty of Education, will be one of the keynote speakers at Library Journal’s virtual event, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center, which will be held on October 1. In preparation for the conference, Levitin shares with LJ his thoughts on how his work can help librarians themselves, and their patrons, find the needle they need in today’s ever-growing information haystack.