June 25, 2016

Rebecca T. Miller

About Rebecca T. Miller

Rebecca T. Miller (miller@mediasourceinc.com) is Editorial Director, Library Journal and School Library Journal.

The Power of Words: Answering the call to action on inclusion | Editorial

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I hadn’t heard of the Diversity Council of Australia’s #WordsAtWork campaign until my feed lit up with its call to remove the word guys from workplace use. The comments express conflicting perspectives on whether it was on target or over the top in terms of political correctness. While I basically agree with the council—I’d already been working to break my habit of using guys when addressing colleagues at LJ and School Library Journal (SLJ), a team predominantly made up of women—the full-throated response made me reflect on how challenging and necessary such conversations are.

Reality Check: Falling short in Orlando | Editorial

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This year, the American Library Association (ALA) has the opportunity to make its annual conference more meaningful than ever. While it will be held among the artifice of Orlando’s tourist draws, the meeting will be full of dialog about very real issues, driven by the cultural moment and determination to move the needle on what my colleague John N. Berry III would call the “accursed questions.” Those questions continue to press, and I am hopeful this ALA will live up to its promise to help the field effectively grapple with the challenges ahead.

OverDrive’s Potash and Penguin Random House’s Applebaum Honored by UJA-Federation

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At a high energy midtown New York gala, the UJA-Federation of New York honored Steve Potash, president and CEO of leading library ebook distributor OverDrive, Inc., and Stuart S. Applebaum, emeritus executive vice president of Corporate Communications at Penguin Random House. UJA’s annual Publishing Division Dinner, held May 24, marked the first time the organization has acknowledged someone entirely dedicated to digital content with its celebration of Potash’s contributions.

Elevated by Art: A lofty vision in the community living room | Editorial

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Paper Cloud is something to see, though it’s actually impossible to see it all at once. This “aerial sculpture” by George Peters and Melanie Walker has resonated with me since I saw it in 2014 during a tour of several facilities in the Salt Lake County Libraries (SLCL) system. The installation flies, floats, and wends its way through the West Jordan Library and the library’s Viridian Event Center, elevating the spaces and the people using them.

Defending Inclusion | Editorial

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North Carolina’s adoption of the so-called “bathroom bill” (House Bill 2, also known as the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act) on March 23 has been rightly denounced for building bias and discrimination into state law and barring cities from extending protections for transgender individuals. It should go without saying that wholesale bigotry against members of a group is unacceptable and unconstitutional. This legislation is a travesty and an assault on our civil liberties.

In Solidarity: Standing with UK Libraries | Editorial

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Last month, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) released a series of articles on the status of public libraries in the UK. The news is dramatic. More than 300 libraries have been closed since 2010—the reported total of 343 includes 132 mobile libraries, with over 100 more on the chopping block—and almost 8,000 jobs have been lost. The advocacy drumbeat for UK libraries has been sounding for some time, with prominent authors and celebrities offering their support. Staring down the numbers reported by the BBC has spurred a barrage of public and professional response—some reinforcing negative stereotypes and others helping to build the case for more investment.

Global by Nature: Reflecting on the collective work ahead | Editorial

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This summer, Columbus, OH, will be the center of the library world when the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) brings its annual World Library and Information Congress there, August 13–19. For many U.S. librarians, this meeting, which last came to the States in 2001, provides rare access to the global sharing active members of IFLA experience each year. If you haven’t yet considered attending, do so soon, as it promises to be a robust conclave of some 4,000 librarians from all over the world. Witnessing the global nature of this work, and sharing with colleagues from some 120 countries, should be inspiring and will, hopefully, spark many significant and lasting connections.

The Right Leader for LC: Opportunity for all with Carla Hayden | Editorial

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The Library of Congress (LC) is due for a turnaround, and with President Barack Obama’s announcement that Dr. Carla D. Hayden is his pick to be the new Librarian of Congress, promise is in the air. The library community has benefited from her leadership for decades. More important, the people of Baltimore, where Hayden has led the Enoch Pratt Free Library since 1993, have seen and lived what this creative leader is capable of when faced with a daunting challenge. She converted a dire situation there into a vital, responsive system. I am inspired by Hayden’s vision of LC as everyone’s library. She is a leader who can make that real in a way it never has been before.

A Great Place to Work: Where challenge and contribution converge | Editorial

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Innovation Catalyst Librarian, Wikipedian in Residence, Director of Knowledge Curation and Innovation. These are just three of the job titles emerging in libraries that indicate the dynamism of the field. They point to libraries as a destination for talent seeking a great place to develop a career while making a contribution. Long misunderstood in the popular psyche as a haven of employment for those who just love to read, libraries are complex service organizations with opportunities to get paid to do good work for a lifetime. As they have evolved, so have the particular jobs available, and now is an exceptionally interesting time to think of the library as the place to dedicate the bulk of one’s waking hours. Along the way, libraries are looking more and more like the innovative employer every community should have humming at its core.

Adversary or Ally? The trouble with fines and fees | Editorial

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Last month the Park Ridge Public Library, IL, approved fees for those using the facility for business purposes. On its face, this decision runs counter to the burgeoning interest in libraries embracing a workforce that is increasingly outside the office by developing coworking spaces and gathering essential tools to enable them to succeed. On a deeper level, it runs counter to the ingenuity involved in continually removing barriers to access—even barriers constructed to keep the use of the library fair, such as overdue fines—and this I find much more problematic and worth contemplating.