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Inside Annoyed Librarian

The AL in Print

Once again one of the most controversial issues in bibliotek blogland is little old me. Everyone is so sweet to keep paying so much attention to me.

I’ve hinted for a while now that the Annoyed Librarian was finally going to be in print – genuine, old fashioned library 1.0 paper – and that day has arrived. There is now a special issue of the Journal of Access Services (Volume 5, Issue 4) devoted to yours truly. You can purchase the volume, or, better yet, just ILL all the articles and distribute the PDFs to your friends. The articles cover a range of standard AL themes, with some new stuff and some stuff from the blog brought together and revised into thematic essays. The final article is completely new, and has little to do with any of the regular themes. "The Regressive Econometrical Confabulations of Accessibility: More Access Means More Work for You" is my contribution to the scholarly library literature. It has endnotes and everything! Now all those library school courses that discuss the Annoyed Librarian (sad, but true; they exist) can assign real articles. Exciting stuff!

My now friend Wayne Bivens-Tatum guest edited the volume and wrote an introductory essay. He’s a real sweetie pie and was a pleasure to work with, so don’t give him too much heat about this. He’s been tortured enough by reading more Annoyed Librarian than any human should have to. (Of course if he hadn’t agreed to this project, I couldn’t have talked him into starting his own blog.)

As usual with all things Annoyed Librarian, the fact that a "peer-reviewed" journal about access services of all things published an entire AL-themed issue has a lot of people steamed. I’d link to some of these people, but they resent me so much I’m sure they would hate it if I directed a lot of traffic to their blogs. It’s the end of peer review and academic standards and the world as we know it! And all that sort of thing. Because of course we all know how great the stuff usually is that appears in these scholarly library journals! Librarians are so stuffy sometimes. I find it amusing to have a scholarly library journal dedicated to a blogger who has made fun of library literature. I get to make fun of library literature from within the library literature. The twists and turns are freaking me out a little bit, but a martini will calm me down and put things into perspective.

Some people are asking the question, Why the heck did a Haworth journal publish a special issue devoted to the AL? That question, I cannot answer. As with LJ, the Journal of Access Services came to me, not I to it. I just do what I do and let the world sit at my feet. Why did I do it? Mostly because I thought it would be funny. I couldn’t imagine anything more absurd than a journal devoted to access services publishing a special issue like this. That should be funny on the face of it, and anyone who doesn’t think so takes this profession way too seriously.

What are the details? It’s a long story.

Take yourself back to November 2006 (I told you this was a long story!). The AL was starting to take off but probably had only a couple hundred regular readers. It had actually just been mentioned in a guest column on "dissident librarians" in American Libraries written by Wayne, which is what brought him to my attention, even though I think he misinterpreted the AL as a "conservative" blog. (Some of you hostile political types might be interested in p. 595 of the journal issue, btw.)

The editor of JAS contacted me and wanted to devote a special issue to the Annoyed Librarian, to do something fresh presumably. Since this was to be a special issue from Haworth, it would also be published as a separate monograph, a habit of Haworth’s that annoyed me until it was going to work to my advantage. I agreed, recruited Wayne to edit, and for the next several months wrote much of the blog with the journal/monograph in mind. Wayne agreed to edit and write the introduction because he thought it was going to be a book and as editor he’d finally get his name in the LC Authority File.

We turned the manuscript in the first week of September 2007. Soon after, Taylor & Francis bought Haworth and suspended the practice of monographic reprints. We were not amused. In the early spring of this year, we heard from an editor at Routledge that they were going to be publishing the monograph. Happy days! Then in August, the same editor wrote that they were reviewing the manuscript again, because someone had finally read it and realized it probably wasn’t a scholarly monograph. Sad days. Then in October Routledge backed out because this clearly wasn’t a scholarly monograph. Sadder days. And now Wayne will never get his name in the LC Authority File until he writes his own damn book.

So there you have it. Much, I am sure, to the chagrin of my critics, the AL now has the imprimatur of a genuine scholarly journal (even if it is just a library journal). And if you think that’s bizarre, you’re absolutely right. The most exciting thing about it is that now I can submit twopointopia and twopointopian to the OED. You see, they only accept words that have appeared in print. One day I want to see those words in the OED, with the "Annoyed Librarian" quoted as the source. That’s even better than the LC Authority File.

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Comments

  1. jaradams says:

    I’m not sure that anything’s better than the LC Authority file, but congratulations on the print thing. Confusion to our foes… and to our friends!

  2. Greedo says:

    Since I am an Annoyed Librarian too, do I get a cut of the profits?

    Tens and twenties will be fine.

  3. librarydude says:

    Academic librarians that are familiar with Haworth publications will tell you that this organization is just a notch above TV Guide. Haworth is scholarly in description only. It’s not a surprise that they would take this desparate measure. What have they got to lose? They’re already at the bottom.

  4. soren faust says:

    Ah, dude, your just jealous because the only publication you could get anything published in happens to be TV Guide.

  5. Green with Envy says:

    Jealousy, thy name is librarydude.

  6. the.effing.librarian says:

    you can delete this, but I was too lazy to find an email address to send this to you: hxxp://effinglibrarian.blogspot.com/2008/11/unc-gets-11m-to-help-library-students.html
    I didn’t know there was a scholarship named for you.

  7. soren faust says:

    AL, I had a chance to read the introduction written by Wayne and enjoyed his perspective of your role in the world of library blogs and librarianship, in general. I also appreciate how having an entire journal volume dedicated to the AL is probably like drinking acid to the other “more serious” librarian blogs, which of course I find delightful. I look forward to reading your essays.

    I’m also curious to see what some of those politicized readers of yours is going to think about your politics, because from early on this has always been considered a “conservative” librarian’s blog. In fact, last year the journal published by the PLG wrote an editorial about anonymity and the library blogger’s “duty” to use real identities. They never mentioned you specifically, but anyone who has been around your blog long enough knows that you were one of their main targets, as I’m sure John Berry will attest—although he wasn’t one of the authors of the article.

    The PLG, being who they are, of course, made it into an “us and them” situation: the left on the good side who use real names and the right on the bad side who don’t. The point is that it’s interesting that you kept direct politics, for the most part, out of reach and I think you’re better for it. I’m sure it will make some of your more political readers disappointed. But the fact is that not everything occurring in the library world is a political issue and to make it such only degrades the message.

  8. Media Maven says:

    Wow.

    First a blog.

    Now being published (and let me say one step up from a vanity press) in a journal.

    What’s next on the horizon?

    A public access cable show?

    A docu-drama on Lifetime?

    A talk show on Air America?

    A radio show on Sirius?

    An in-depth hour in prime time on MSNBC? (They have had everyone else)

    Please become the next media darling, please.

  9. AL says:

    Not sure I’m ready to be the next media darling, but it is something of a remarkable coincidence that the journal issue (which took two years to produce) should be published at the same time as the unexpected invite from LJ.

    As for the politics, it’s still the totalitarians who want to make every issue a political issue, and for them anyone who doesn’t agree is the enemy. Even most political issues have nothing to do with libraries. After I read that introduction for the first time, I was surprised most about the comparisons with early concerns of the SRRT.

  10. Jonathan says:

    I’m subscribed to quite a few library blogs. Not one has mentioned this publication. If there are “a lot of people steamed” about this, I sure haven’t seen it. Is the A.L.’s time in the spotlight on the decline?

  11. My Name is Mud says:

    The Journal of Access Services is in Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA) from EBSCO, so we should all be able to read it in a few months if we can wait. I can’t.

  12. librarydude says:

    “Ah, dude, your (sp) just jealous because the only publication you could get anything published in happens to be TV Guide.”

    I’ve been published in several journals, including one by Haworth at the beginning of my career. Now that I’m no longer desperate to be published, I would never consider submitting anything to Haworth. And I’m not alone in that feeling.

  13. Perished says:

    It is publish or perish.

    I guess I perished years and years ago.

  14. Faucet says:

    I thought that the Journal of Access Services was peer reviewed.

    Having read the AL for a long time, I thought that nobody measured up. I guess it must have been self-reviewed.

  15. Auntie Nanuuq says:

    “Because of course we all know how great the stuff usually is that appears in these scholarly library journals! Librarians are so stuffy sometimes. I find it amusing to have a scholarly library journal dedicated to a blogger who has made fun of library literature.”

    Well, yes we do know how Totally Stuffy Librarians can be, not to mention boring, arrogant, and anal-cranial inverted!

    What a good thing to have happen for you, Al. Congratulations!

    We need humor, and sometimes we need to have the stuffing shaken out of us!

    If, the publishing world can publish the likes of; Howard Stern, Sarah Palin, Bill O’Reilly, Rush Limbaugh, and Ann Coulter, well why not Al?

    Frankly what a breath of fresh air, and it’s just what the Stuffed up Library World needs!

    Sighs…. 8-)

  16. Just an Idiot says:

    So if humor is the way to go with scholarly library works, maybe I should submit my work to Mad Magazine.

  17. soren faust says:

    L-dude, I think a big point is being missed here. It’s not important in what journal the AL got published. What is important is that for some reason the AL hits a raw nerve with many librarians. Why is this so? It’s the thing I find the most intriguing. Is it the popularity of the AL in opposition to the lack of popularity of other librarian bloggers? Is this popularity being interpreted as one more blow to a profession in trouble? The issues AL hosts are not new, so what gives? Her “snarkiness”? Her anonymity?

    It seems hardly the issue that Haworth is the publisher, as if that somehow invalidates anything the AL writes about. The real issue is why you, librarydude, and many like you, continually read and comment on a blog you apparently despise? To say the phenomena that is the AL, along with her ability to rally so many librarians to call for her extinction or exaltation, is less than intriguing is wrong. No other library blogger comes close to having this kind of influence.

    The real issue here is this: the AL is not one of you. And a crowd hates it when there is something that stands in contrast to the herd that they really are.

  18. Spartacus says:

    I am the Annoyed Librarian.

  19. Brent says:

    I am proud of you AL. Maybe this is what it felt like if I read Diablo Cody’s blog before she made a lot of money publishing a book and movie scripts.

  20. Jim Rettig says:

    The point of her whole post is that she is being published in an academic journal, so the quality of that journal is relevant to the discussion.

  21. carptrash says:

    “”peer-reviewed” journal
    So, I think this means that I can safely quote you in wikipedia.
    So . . . . . . ……… if I feed you a few lines, and you use them, then . … ?
    eeeeeeeeeeek

  22. soren faust says:

    Jim, that’s true. My point, however, is that librarydude misses the point, generally speaking. In other words, he appears to have set a standard for this blog and when it does not match his standard then his predetermined point is proven: the blog fails. It’s been his MO from the beginning. Taking this into consideration, it’s not too off-track to say that it really doesn’t matter what journal the AL was published in, because what ultimately matters is that no matter what this blog will always fail to meet his expectations.

    The question is this: why should the AL be judged by his standard and not her own? I’m not sure if you’ve read the AL’s motto: it states, “whatever it is, I’m against it.” This was written on her old blog and I imagine it hasn’t changed. This is the expectation someone should have when they read this blog, i.e. a gadfly, of sorts, and not some imagined one based on personal bias and dislike. It is hard to take the dude’s criticisms seriously when his response will be the same each and every time.

  23. Auntie Nanuuq says:

    Sad news AL…although I love your wit & pointed articles (so far)…

    When I went to “subscribe” to “Journal of Access Services” (ISSN: 1536-7967)
    Volume: 5 Issue: 4, there was a $69 charge, and being a lowly paid librarian, I was unable to afford the cost!

    I guess I’ll have to order a copy of it from ILL for $3.

    I hope you are looking forward to royalties from this publication!

  24. AL says:

    It’s academic, so no royalties. This is my gift to the world!

  25. Sam Walton says:

    “It’s academic, so no royalties. This is my gift to the world!”

    Which way to the exchange counter?

  26. AL says:

    “I thought that the Journal of Access Services was peer reviewed.”

    Unfortunately, the AL has no peers.

  27. AL says:

    “By the way, folks are now speculating that Wayne is AL.”

    Hardly a surprise. Let’s say he agreed to edit and write the introduction with some reluctance anticipating that very thing.

  28. sidney says:

    If Wayne is the AL, why edit the volume and start the speculation? Of course if Wayne is NOT the AL, why edit the volume? I’ve always hoped the AL was an anarcho-syndicalist collective living in Central Park.

  29. infoSciPhi says:

    Deny it all you want – the jig is up. ;) AL likes to hyphenate and so does Wayne. Just one example of the similarities I have found. Come on, tell me you like conspiracies.

    Here are some examples from Wayne’s blog: I won’t go to the trouble to pull them from your old Blogger site.

    “quasi-tenure, damn-all, open-minded, get-rid-of-the-print-books, time-keeping, shape-shifting, counter-arguments, journal-cum-newspaper, space-saving, one-stop…”

  30. Morse says:

    I think someone might be a little obsessed.

  31. InfoSciPhi says:

    Wayne,
    1.) You wrote something for publication on AL (what became the Journal of Access Services issue)

    2.) You wrote an editorial for American Libraries on the subject of “ALA and Politicized Librarianship”;
    3.) called Wikipedia “The Wikipedia” within a week of the AL doing the same thing;
    4.) wrote a first blog post where you talked about wanting tenure before starting the blog, meaning an anonymous blog would have been a plausible outlet before that time.

    You wrote, in your first LJ column, “In fact, I’ve never had a course in ethics at all, though I do keep a copy of Kant’s Metaphysik der Sitten to pull out during faculty meetings.” Tell me this isn’t a Philosophy and Religion Librarian at Princeton writing this….

    Am I wrong? Just say it and I’ll back off: Say “Wayne Bivens-Tatum is NOT the Annoyed Librarian”.

  32. InfoSciPhi says:

    Morse,
    Not obsessed – incensed. :-D

  33. comedygoddess.blogspot.com says:

    I hope your jacket photo is blank. With just your logo in its place.

  34. Roger says:

    I don’t know AL, he’s starting to make some sense. Is it true?

  35. AL says:

    Hmmm, would it help if I say: Wayne Bivens-Tatum is NOT the Annoyed Librarian? Wayne doesn’t appearing to be commenting on this thread. Perhaps he’ll comment on his own blog.

  36. Denise says:

    Well, I don’t know where InfoSciPhi is coming from on this, but since he mentioned it, I have been skimming Wayne’s blog. It does sound very similar in tone and phrasing to the AL. Even the initials of the blog, Academic Librarian, fit well. Interesting.

  37. InfoSciPhi says:

    I’m sure “Wayne” will. Better get to writing. :-)

  38. soren faust says:

    It would be a really cool trick if it were true. How cool!

  39. InfoSciPhi says:

    For the record, I don’t know Wayne, but I like his politics, and share his love for philosophy. Nothing personal. Anyway, “no press is bad press” right AL?

  40. dewey_decimal says:

    Quite a feat — at least on par with Joe the Plumber’s book deal.

  41. FreeBird says:

    I’m sure Wayne Newton has better things to do.

  42. carptrash says:

    “The question is this: why should the AL be judged by his standard and not her own?”
    And my question is why does anyone have to be judged at all? You know, “Judge not lest you . . . “

    “ I’m not sure if you’ve read the AL’s motto: it states, “whatever it is, I’m against it.”’
    Actually (one of 26 words or phrases that really [another one] means “my opinion”) the Ramones did a song called “I’m Against It” long before AL picked up on it. Tho, it’s the same basic idea. eeeeeeeek

  43. KWis says:

    Annoyed Librarian–YOU ROCK! You make me laugh and brighten my day. And pat yourselves on the back Library Journal, because you got AL I now check all of your blogs.

  44. KWis says:

    Annoyed Librarian–YOU ROCK! You make me laugh and brighten my day. And pat yourselves on the back Library Journal, because you got AL I now check all of your blogs.

  45. Tudor Rose says:

    AL, going back to old fashioned library 1.0 paper, huh? In this world of digital libraries and electronic journals and Google Books, why, that’s positively novel! How very forward thinking of you.

  46. Librarian says:

    Tomorrow is ILL Time for me. Thanks AL, I look forward to some fine reading!!

  47. importer and exporter says:

    Soren Faust asked: “Is it the popularity of the AL in opposition to the lack of popularity of other librarian bloggers? Is this popularity being interpreted as one more blow to a profession in trouble? The issues AL hosts are not new, so what gives? Her “snarkiness”? Her anonymity?”

    No offense, but I think the popularity of this blog has nothing to do with the AL. The majority of the comments are mostly unrelated to the original post. I think people come here because it’s a place to hang out and talk about whatever you feel like. It’s like a coffee shop where you just drop in and start a conversation about anything. That’s cool. Personally, my favorite topic was the one about fish oil supplements. We all need a place where we can hang out and chat, and maybe vent once in a while.

  48. Morse says:

    The motto “whatever it is, I’m against it” is probably from the Marx Brothers’ Horse Feathers. The Groucho character sings it. “Ever since they commenced it, I’m against it!” There’s a Youtube video of it, but the comments section wouldn’t let me post the link.

  49. Mr. Kat says:

    You know, some of us may take these blogs humorously and only as light comedy. However, I do not. The initial reading is fun, but later is not fun. For then I am made aware that what is a joke in AL’s blog is something I have myself witnessed in real life.

    Now if it was just me, I would dismiss it. but here is the AL stating the existance of these problems in public; and here are other people who have witnessed the same incidents, chiming in chorus.

    Naturally, this is only anecdotal evidence to those who have never seen anything contrary to their personal BORG mandate, but then these sort of people rarely recognize a problem until it runs out of the bushes and bites them. Even when it DOES bite them, they typically then blame someone else for the failure of the thing that bit them.

    Your blog is not funny, AL. Your blog is to library world what McCain picking Sarah Palin was to the political world. Yes, naturally, those who love the entity swallow it whole and demand more – they see NO problem at all with this person – those are our peppy Librarins everywhere who scowl at the AL.

    The rest of us see the joke, and we laugh. Then we realize that this is not a joke; this is our reality: we could have a Combatant, Dictatorial, My-Way-Or-The-Highway-To-Nowhere Mother in the Whitehouse running our country the way MOMMA KNOWS BEST!! NOT FUNNY!

    The point of the matter is that there are very real issues in library world right now and those inside library world REFUSE to see them. Naturally, if anything changed, they might be out of a job – or they might have to go do actual work for a change – so they can’t have this dissonance in the wave pool!

    Bless you, AL, for cracking the glass dome. The public united does not have a glass house to fear losing; V is for Vendetta!

    This may be my coffeehouse, but it is my coffeehouse of choice to go and discuss serious library philosophy!

  50. htmldude says:

    I’m just glad God gave me the ability to skim.

  51. Original Anonymous Librarian says:

    Oh, those people are going to hate you. I have to see the article on the “Librarian Shortage”. This has been the field’s version of the Snipe Hunt for at least three decades. Yes, and what about beach front property in Wyoming ALA? It’ll be interesting how this all washes in the looming recession.
    You can con some people some of the time, but…. What we REALLY need is reality.

  52. Anonymous says:

    As a public librarian, I cannot ILL periodicals or articles. I also cannot afford $69.00.

  53. soren faust says:

    What kind of public library do you work for? I’ve already ILL’d 50% of that journal through my system.

  54. General Nuisance, Retired says:

    I am glad to see that my tax dollars support cheap librarians.

  55. soren faust says:

    Your tax dollars and mine, jerky.

  56. General Nuisance, Retired says:

    You want to read stuff, pay for it yourself. If it is for “professional development” then definitely pay for it yourself.

    The gravy train is over.

  57. AL says:

    Alas, I wish there were a cheaper monograph to buy. My wish was to have every library in the land purchase a copy. I speculated it would be the best-selling book on library issues ever, but no go. maybe ALA Editions would be interested in a reprint some day.

  58. soren faust says:

    General Nuisance, you are a nuisance, aren’t you?

    Well, here’s a deal for you. I see that you are retired, which means that the social security that comes out of my check goes into your pocket. Of course, I won’t see any of it when I retire. So, here’s the deal. I will order whatever the hell I want to whenever I want to through ILL. And you can continue to fund my freeloading habits through the social security payments that you got from me. Dig?

  59. Chuck D says:

    People have been decrying the collapse of Social Security for decades. Don’t worry, you’ll get your Social Security payments when you retire. The hype machine is at it again.

  60. General Nuisance, Retired says:

    I send back my Social Security. I make enough off sound investments than to rely on the guvmint.

    Now, go request a hundred articles and charge it back to the taxpayers. It will look like you are being busy. Make sure you include the ones from the AL and all other anonymous library mavens.

  61. carptrash says:

    i think the SS hype was part of a particular political party’s attempt to divert all the SS funds into the Stock Market to put off the crash until the other party was in control. In any case I am not counting on too much from Social Security. Perhaps pick up my coffee tab at the coffee shop? eeek

  62. Happily Anonymous says:

    librarydude commented: Academic librarians that are familiar with Haworth publications will tell you that this organization is just a notch above TV Guide. Haworth is scholarly in description only. It’s not a surprise that they would take this desparate measure. What have they got to lose? They’re already at the bottom. Since when are any library journals worth the paper they were printed on? In my experience all sorts of garbage gets printed in supposedly respectable ‘peer reviewed journals’ including ‘research’ that amounted to ‘a conversation my son and his friend had on our porch about books and some questions I asked them a few years later’ (that made it longitudinal). I love the AL and think that this is probably the best thing published in a library journal for an age!
    (my apologies to Krashen and similar researchers, I know some of you do real research on libraries and librarianship)

  63. The Anonymous Doctor says:

    You know, the medical profession did not really take off and gain respectability until doctors started snarking at each other anonymously and by making Journals like JAMA and the like started becoming vanity presses for shy doctors who would take a stand behind their own name. I mean, Dr. Spock. Yeah right and I am Captain Kirk.

    Thanks AL for bringing us up to speed.

  64. soren faust says:

    Happily Anon, Amen! Library Lit is littered with garbage on all levels of so-called research. One of the first things I did when I went to Lib School was check out the professional literature and was horrified by how shallow and meaningless it was. It’s amazing how many librarians are aghast at this situation. infosciphi actually believes it is the beginning of the end of peer reviewed journals! I’d say that’s a little hyperbolic.<

  65. soren faust says:

    Just keep the cash flow comin’ general. I may need some more $$$ from those sound investments of yours.

  66. a person says:

    In the amount of time you people take to complain about the poor quality of articles published in library journals you could…start to write better, well-researched articles.

    Now settle down and get back to work.

  67. neros tsuaf says:

    I think the issue is not time, but what to write about. There is an amazing redundancy in library lit. It’s the advent of the Great Dilution.

  68. General Nuisance, Retired says:

    “Just keep the cash flow comin’ general. I may need some more $$ from those sound investments of yours.

    If you keep wasting money on buying re-cycled crap from a blogger, I think you may not be financial sane.

    BTW, the AL reminds me of the Monty Python sketch where a man pays for an argument.

    All you have to do is say one thing, and the AL contradicts you. What an easy gig.

  69. not a person says:

    Sorry a person, librarians can now only rite in short sentences that are easily understood.

    : )

    lol

  70. soren faust says:

    I’d buy an argument if the taxpayers paid for it.

  71. General Nuisance, Retired says:

    No you wouldn’t

  72. Jim Rettig says:

    By dollars paid, the U.S. Social Security program is the largest government program in the world and the single greatest expenditure in the federal budget, with 20.9% for social security and 20.4% for Medicare/Medicaid, compared to 20.1% for military expenditure. Social Security is currently the largest social insurance program in the U.S., constituting 37% of government expenditure and 7% of the gross domestic product and is currently estimated to keep roughly 40% of all Americans age 65 or older out of poverty.

  73. A.S. Hole says:

    Thanks for the economics lesson.

    Next time I want to seriously discuss information technology I will go to the AE (anonymous economist) blog.

    Moral of the story, if you don’t have anything to add to the thread, shut up.

    Carry on the snark AL.

  74. Free Bird says:

    Why would you go to an economics blog to discuss information technology? Your sarcasm doesn’t make any sense.

  75. A.S. Hole says:

    ***sigh***

  76. Really Annoyed Librarian says:

    Uh, the greatest depression ever is unfolding before. Try talking about this instead of yourself. Huge budget cuts are coming. Ye are warned. Prepare.

  77. Pubic Librarian says:

    It is ok, because we are going to start charging for services.

  78. carptrash says:

    “It is ok, because we are going to start charging for services.”
    Reminds me of am old Tom Leher song (are there any new ones?) “Now there’s a charge for what used to be for free, in my home town.”
    Admittedly he was discussing his old flame, but I suspect that the New Depression might not be the best time to start charging for what used to be for free in any arena. How about trading our services for a chicken or a couple of tomatoes or potatoes?

    admitedly

  79. ex-con-chick says:

    It’s not a Depression, it’s just a correction. Stock prices were too high so they are simply coming down to a reasonable level. It happens about once every 15-20 years. Just ride it out for about nine months, and it will all be over.

  80. carptrash says:

    “Just ride it out for about nine months, and it will all be over.”
    sort of like being pregnant? Of course (another of the 26) after that you have a kid for the next 50 years or so. We’ll see. Life as a spectator sport. eeeeeeek

  81. Herbert says:

    “It’s not a Depression, it’s just a correction. Stock prices were too high so they are simply coming down to a reasonable level. It happens about once every 15-20 years. Just ride it out for about nine months, and it will all be over.”

    We will all be settling into our Obamavilles by then.

  82. Ms. Puss E Cat says:

    I enjoy the AL and will purchase a copy of her print opus as part of my professional reading budget.(I’m a corporate and I can do that because I negotiated for that slice of the budget).

    I also enjoy skimming throught the comments section and seeing all the loser librarians complaining. Library Dude &

  83. Ms. Puss E Cat says:

    I enjoy the AL and will purchase a copy of her print opus as part of my professional reading budget.(I’m a corporate and I can do that because I negotiated for that slice of the budget).

    I also enjoy skimming throught the comments section and seeing all the loser librarians complaining. Library Dude &

  84. writeous says:

    If that’s what you call professional reading, I would keep that to yourself.

  85. Anonymous says:

    Soren, your public library is better than mine. I hope you appreciate it.

  86. soren faust says:

    Anonymous, in all seriousness, I have to wonder if I am in fact lucky (as ridiculous as it sounds). In all honesty, I’m probably pretty naive when it comes to the day to day reality of most public libraries. I work in a large urban public library, which (although is having funding problems right now) will always be a relatively well-funded institution by dint of its place in this city and its history. So, I don’t want to pretend that I know what other public librarians are having to deal with. I think public libraries get a pretty bad rap and are underappreciated. I’m pretty sure if you were to ask the patrons that come to my library if the library is a worthless institution, they’d spit in the face of the naysayers that proliferate in library blogs, in this one, particularly. I find it ironic that it seems librarians are more likely to say that public libraries are for sh’t while the public differs greatly, (with the exception of the ubiquitious “taxpayer” dumba’ss comment every once in awhile. There must be something in the DSM IV about it, somewhere.

  87. anonymous says:

    First of all, may I note that there are far too many posts purporting to come from anonymous. It dilutes the brand, and frankly, not very many posters really qualify for true anonymous posting privileges.

    Anyway, the real issue is what to think of a peer review process that doesn’t know (or won’t reveal)who the author really is and what the creditials of authorship really are. Isn’t that issue #1 when it comes to information literacy? But, AL has proclaimed information literacy a sham. How convenient for AL. I guess that’s the difference between library science and real disciplines, huh?

  88. Mr. Kat says:

    You are still hung up on this whole pesudoanonymity crap???

    I would say the bigger problem is NOT the identity of this one blogger, but rather quality of the peer review process in Library Science.

    What should we think about a peer review process that is bent towards publication as default and sees little difference between what is published in the hard heavy science journals and what passes for science in library science journals?

    I have heard the arguement: The Library Science field is small, and in order to grow and become prominent and respectible, we have to publish as much as possible so there is actually something to read about the field. And besides, all the other fields started like this, right?

    They didn’t.

    Anonymous, it is clear you flunked information literacy 101. The first thing you should know about the peer review process is that it may be open, single blind, or even double blind. In double blind reviews, the reviewers are given the paper without any names on it – indeed, all parts the maention names and even places like universities supporting the project are cut off or blacked out. In single blind reviews, one party is known; typically, the reviewer knows who the author is and the author does not know who the reviewer is. there are exceptions, though, where the author knows who the reviewers are but the reviewers do not know who the authro is. And in open reviews everybody knows who everybody is. Tthe method used is entirely up to the editors involved. This system was set up so papers with IDEAS of merit could reach the light of publication EVEN IF the whole world thought that person is an idiot. If a brilliant 5 year old wrote a scientific paper and the review community only saw the paper content and not the author, and the paper was BRILLIANT, that paper COULD BE PUBLISHED!!!!

    You have still not yet figured out that it is the ideas and the content of a paper that matters – who the author is means ZILCH!

    If you are still defining literature by the person who wrote it, you are an IDIOT!

  89. Frogger says:

    This is the way the peer review process is supposed to work, but it is naive to think that this is how it really works. If a prominent author submits a work, the journal will find a way to publish it, regardless of the quality of the content.

  90. A. Non E. Mouse says:

    Sadly, most peer reviewed journals in all fields are little more than vanity presses. The academic world is so caught up in the publish or perish paradigm that it becomes a game of “I will review your article if you review mine”. And they keep submitting the same article to different journals to boost their numbers. I have cataloged thousands of scientific articles on a particular narrow subject, so I know all the scientists who publish and what their research is. You see the same thing over and over again in journal after journal. Same goes for “library research”.

    Everyone loves their citation analysis, but like the AL, all you have to do is throw out a pile of suspect articles, and then you get thousands of citations, mostly saying what an idiot you are.

    I say, job well done AL, Hear Hear. Pip Pip. Tallyho!!!!

  91. soren faust says:

    Plus, the academic world is pretty small. My girlfren is an editor for a journal and she is always getting requests from scientists such as not wanting a certain reviewer to be the one reviewing the article because it is perceived that there is a bias on the part of the reviewer, real or imagined. On the other hand, the ideal of the system is what is important even though flaws are bound to appear. It still weeds out a lot of bunk, especially in the hard sciences.

    Concerning library lit, I’ve read some really great articles that are worthy of being publishied, but have read an overwhelming number of pointless drivel that wastes resources and downgrades the profession (and, yes, it is a profession). From reading a post written by Wayne, the editor of the AL project, this journal volume was originally planned as a monograph. However, Haworth was, I believe, bought out by another company who then discontinued the monograph publishing. Somewhere along the line, right or wrong, the AL monograph was turned into a journal volume. It has certainly incensed a lot of people, understandably, but I don’t think it’s the end of the world.

  92. Colored Priamily says:

    I know who the AL is.

    Joe Klein.

  93. Mr. Kat says:

    If any of you had actually read library journals, like I do, you would know that MOST of the publications are will-written and concise. If you think otherwise, you continue to be an IDIOT.

  94. Dr. Perish says:

    Actually, I thank the AL for being published anonymously. I have been running behind in my writing and my performance rating is in jeopardy. Now I can cite all these papers as mine and I will get a fat raise.

    Thanks AL.

  95. Not Academic says:

    God, God, God, am I glan I’m not an academic librarian. What a bunch of full of crap snobs some of you are. Don’t fool yourselves; Library Science is barely a science in the first place and I think MAD magazine is an excellent place to publish schholarly library articles.

  96. soren faust says:

    Mr. Kat, I disagree with you and I do read library journals. The number one problem the amount of literature being produced in the field of librarianship. This is not a science, not even a pseudo-science, and there is simply no need to publish minutae about nothing in particular. I think some of the technical subjects deserve to be written about because of how quickly it changes and how it relates to libraries. But the truly substantial information is not coming from librarians, it’s coming from those in tech-related fields. When I first went to library school, I spent a lot of time looking through the stacks and stacks of literature and pretty underwhelmed by what I read. The most interesting thing about the time I spent in the library looking at the collection was the paper I wrote for a Fundamentals course about the history of the idea of librarianship as a science. It was fun to trace the lineage of that idea throughout the collection of articles. But, in between all of that was a lot of offal.

    I’m not an academic librarian, but if you call debating about subjects relevant to librarianship than I’m not sure what to think of your assessment. Is to debate snobbery?

  97. carptrash says:

    eeeek

  98. Mr. Kat says:

    If you don’t see the value in library literature, then you don’t DESERVE to be an academic librarian. Keep all the IDIOTS in the public library sphere please.

  99. Juris says:

    We here at the law library laugh and laugh when the public and academic librarians start b!tch slapping each other.

    Of course that lasts all of twenty seconds because we then have to get back to work — a concept you fail to understand.

  100. soren faust says:

    Mr. Kat, now you’re being an arsehole. You don’t even “work” in a library, but spend your free time there pretending to be a librarian. Maybe you should read less library lit and find a job doing it instead of reading about it.

    And Juris, I happen to be on my off day and I’m doing statistics homework. I use this as a way to take a mental break, similiar to playing solitare on the computer. Now, stop reading and get back to work.

  101. exlibsci librarian says:

    I spent three years in an academic library as the librarian for Library Science, and I have to agree that most of the professional literature is crap. Little more than tenure filler and a waste of time and resources.

  102. a person says:

    Some of the most credible, well-researched, well-written, most meaningful articles in so-called “Library Science” or library-related journals are, in fact, not science at all. They are works of scholarship in the tradition of the humanities. For example, many of the articles in Papers of the Bibliographic Society of America that are written by librarians, and read by librarians, but use the method and approach of the humanities disciplines. There are plenty of articles in cataloging-related journals (e.g. CCQ) that fall in the same category. They have arguments, they cite evidence in support of those arguments, they assess and attempt to address possible counterarguments, and they demonstrate the broader mplications and importance of those arguments. How’s that not good scholarship?

    It is, however, NOT “science”. Those kinds of articles don’t use the approaches and standards of evidence of the social sciences, much less the natural sciences. The approaches to the pursuit of knowledge that natural scientists and social scientists use would be inappropriate anyway for many of the questions the authors of these kinds of articles want to ask anyway.

    Oh, and authors of these kinds of articles don’t publish under pseudonyms (at least that I have ever been aware of, although I suppose it’s possible.)

    Make of that what you will. I could go either way on the issue. After all plenty of cogent, thoughtful, and meaningful essays about the vagaries of academic life appear in the Chronicle of Higher Education published under psuedonyms.

    Oh, wait, on second thought, scratch “I could go either way.” Actually I don’t care. I like to call the Chronicle of Higher Education the “Crapicle of Higher Education” anyway. The meaninful stuff in it is too rare, although it is there.

    Reading this blog is fun, but my research is more interesting. I’m going to follow my own advice and go work on that now.

    Thanks for reading.

  103. librarydude says:

    OK, library science is not a real science. Thanks for clearing that up.

  104. Mr. Kat says:

    November 21, 2008
    In response to: The AL in Print
    Mr. Kat commented:

    If any of you had actually read library journals, like I do, you would know that MOST of the publications are will-written and concise. If you think otherwise, you continue to be an IDIOT.

    Sorry guys, this is not me. I would never say such words – I have read my share of library journal articels and a vast number of them are horribly written. Some anonymous pervert thinks it’s fun to post as someone else, and it isn’t.

    LJ needs to upgrade the blog untility. this one is very far behind the curve.

  105. IDOIT says:

    Hey Kat, we knew it wasn’t you because the post correctly spelled IDIOT.

    …Right…

  106. Mr. Kat says:

    November 21, 2008
    In response to: The AL in Print
    Mr. Kat commented:

    If you don’t see the value in library literature, then you don’t DESERVE to be an academic librarian. Keep all the IDIOTS in the public library sphere please.

    This was also not me. Someone has found a new way to entertian themselves – and now there will be twice or trhee times as many “Mr. Kat” posts. Funny, but not funny.

    It looks like my earlier comment about the Peer Review process really Struck a nerve!!!

  107. Mr. Kat says:

    See, my imposter has flunked the Mr. kat look alike test. ;) Who ever knoew one of my strangest little quirks could be used to identify my posts!!!

    It’s kind of odd; now I have people wearing my mask and causing mischief. If you really want to know which ones I am, unfortunately, there is no real way to tell.

  108. Mr. Kat says:

    P.S. I don’t really like the idea of all the idiots going to the public library much either. I’d rather see them go somewhere that caters espeically to them. Chucky-E-Cheese followed by Blockbuster followed by that place up on Broadway with the chicken stuffed turkeys.

  109. soren faust says:

    Mr. Kat, the best advise is to ignore the imposters and not respond. They’re looking for attention. This is precisely why this blog platform totally sucks and the AL made one of the biggest mistakes of his/her life by coming over to LJ. LJ YOU SUCK.

  110. Mr. Kat says:

    Soren, it’s quite OK. I just had to let you know that it was not me back there.

    AL might have made a mistake, but this blog near consistantly has over 100 comments per blog. LJ certianly did NOT make a mistake!! And if this popular new blogger on their staff forces them to get a new Funcitonal Comment Modeule, we all win!

  111. Mr. Kat says:

    Besides, no one can THINK like me so no one certainly can not BLOG like me. Contrary to popular belief, I am a big fan of public libraries, I just wouldn’t be caught DEAD working at one.

  112. anonymous says:

    Someone has been posting as me and I want it to stop right now.

  113. boobarella says:

    This is great. Seriously, the AL is cathartic for me. You help me realize that not all librarians are the luddite, maniacal, feline owning type that I run in to in class everyday.

  114. meg says:

    Huh. I just stumbled across your existence. I think you have some good points buried in your posts, but I find it disturbing that you spend so much of your time making snarky attacks against those who think differently than you. Still, I’d probably tolerate it if you were willing to take the heat for your comments, but you’re getting the glory (and presumably the pay) without the attribution. Overall, your posts left me with a bad taste in my mouth rather than rethinking any positions or feeling reaffirmed in any way. I guess I was hoping for more than the anonymous cattiness that pervaded your blog.

  115. anonymous says:

    This is really me, I just looked in the mirror.

    Anyway I don’t just make snarky comments, I read everything everyone writes here. And then I make my insightful trashing of their way of life and way of thinking. So go f@ck yourself.

  116. carptrash says:

    : Some anonymous pervert thinks it’s fun to post as someone else, and it isn’t. ”
    Me to my last post (such as it was) was not by me either. However KAT. we can’t really define (Logic 101) what is fun for someone else, can we? eeeeek

  117. a person says:

    librarydude commented:

    “OK, library science is not a real science. Thanks for clearing that up.”

    I said that many of the good articles in library-related journals aren’t and do not purport to be any kind of science at all. That’s different from saying “Library science is not real science.” That’s also a true statement but it’s not the point my post made.

  118. anonymous says:

    Me again

    Nobody is going to go by their real name here. The next chump coming along will log in as them as spew toxin.

    I am glad that the AL has embraced that aspect of Library 2.0

  119. Mike Hunt says:

    It’s so hard finding inspiration. I knew you’d find me crying. Tell those girls with rifles for minds, that their jokes don’t make me laugh. They only make me feel like dying in an unguarded moment.

  120. FreeBird says:

    Mike needs a hug.

  121. Engelbert Humperdinck says:

    So long, long between mirages; I knew you’d find me drinking. Tell those men with horses for hearts that their jibes don’t make me bleed. They only make me feel like shrinking in an unguarded moment.

  122. Message to AL says:

    AL, could you please go watch “twilight” so you can comment on the movie’s protrayal of reference research in the 21st century? As a Librarian, I found Belle’s process to be…intriguing. Get this – Belle used Amazon to find a local bookseller, buy a reference book, and then cross-reference material in taht reference book with Google. NO LIBRARIES!!! OH THE HORROR!!!!!

    [you know me.]

  123. Anonymous says:

    Sound reasonable to me. All our reference books have either been stolen or declared unnecessary by the administration. If she wanted to research vampires at my library, I’d put her on the electronic resources and suggest that she try to get into an academic library to see the print resources.

  124. Mr. Kat says:

    I also saw the Twilight movie. Belle’s technique is nothing new. Our patrons (or former patrons) are doing stuff like this everyday. Meanwhile, libraries continue to stock their shelves with stuff nobody wants to read. ADAPT OR PERISH!

  125. george the librarian says:

    Hey Mr. Kat. Any possiblity you could stop posting for few days and let other people have a chance? TIA.

  126. Galatrois D'est says:

    So deep, deep without a meaning,
    I knew you’d find me leaving; Tell those friends with cameras for eyes that their hands don’t make me hang; They only make me feel like breathing In an unguarded moment

  127. Library Cynic says:

    “I think you have some good points buried in your posts, but I find it disturbing that you spend so much of your time making snarky attacks against those who think differently than you. Still, I’d probably tolerate it if you were willing to take the heat for your comments, but you’re getting the glory (and presumably the pay) without the attribution. Overall, your posts left me with a bad taste in my mouth rather than rethinking any positions or feeling reaffirmed in any way. I guess I was hoping for more than the anonymous cattiness that pervaded your blog.” In a perfect World AL might well be using a real name. Unfortunately, in the library field, it can get to be more like the Byzantine court than not. Today I received an email from the wife of a classmate and fellow librarian who died of a stroke. This individual had put in two decades of work at a major academic library before moving back to his hometown to take what he thought would be his dream job, and one, I might add, for which he was WELL qualified. He relocated some 2,000 miles at his own personal expense and effort. Unfortunately, the personnel people who ran the interviewing proceedure, left his on-the-job supervisor largely out of the loop. It apparently was browbeat city from day one, followed by having his career trashed six months later. The person in the supervisory position “moved on” to another public library a about three or four years later. Some of the non-professional staff had problems with her that rated intervention by a labor union. My friend was stunned and disappointed by his treatment, was unable to find further work in the field the last years of his life and was supported by his wife. So much for “Professional Ethics”.

  128. george the librarian says:

    That previous post was made by an imposter. I would never say something like that. Even the incoherent ramblings of Mr. Kat have a right to be heard.

  129. Library Cynic says:

    P.S. I want to add that AL has done a good job of raising questions about the state of libraries and librarianship that are often off the “Party Line”, and haven’t gotten much ink at East Huron, and otherwise might well have been silenced. For many, many years matters affecting the lives and careers of librarians have gone “off the radar” of those who could and should have done a better job, but were not quite up to the task. You can all think more about this when pink slip time comes as the recession proceeds. One could wish it were otherwise.

  130. Mr. Kat says:

    “P.S. I want to add that AL has done a good job of raising questions about the state of libraries and librarianship that are often off the “Party Line”, and haven’t gotten much ink at East Huron, and otherwise might well have been silenced. For many, many years matters affecting the lives and careers of librarians have gone “off the radar” of those who could and should have done a better job, but were not quite up to the task. You can all think more about this when pink slip time comes as the recession proceeds. One could wish it were otherwise.”

    Typical librarian response to blame someone eles (East Huron) for your own failures. Make better decisions in your life and you won’t have to worry about blaming others when things don’t go your way. Take responsibility for your life.

  131. 13-18-11-1-20 says:

    Sorry, Imposter, but once again you lose. I happen to agree with Library cynic. Librarians are to blame for librarian failures, which is why the entire profession will be gone in less then ten years. I don’t have much pity, though, there are a number of librarins in the field who have done nothing but make it difficult for those who have tried to work against this decay.

    Imposter George, Real George – It seems we have a new “anonymous” name. Some people have such a lack of imagination that they can only use what they already see.

    It’s also becoming clear that they are the losing side: If they could offer real arguements and real solutions, they would not need to bother with the rest of us.

  132. Library Cynic says:

    You have once again misinterpreted my argument. It is not librarians who are to blame for the failures that are afflicting libraries. It is the nameless organization in Chicago that has done nothing but spout rhetoric. And Mr. Kat, don’t worry about who I take responsiblity for – worry about yourself and your future as a librarian.

  133. Library Cynic says:

    The previous post is also by an impostor.

  134. Library Cynic says:

    So was that one.

  135. Jim Rettig says:

    For everyone that is participating anonymously, aren’t you all, by definition, an imposter?

  136. Maxwell Smart says:

    It’s time to blow this pop stand.

  137. Library Cynic -original says:

    Sounds like some folks my alma mater allowed to graduate – the impostors. I’ll just leave this for folks to ponder if they will and apply to the library situation as it stands, with East Huron, et. al.. Remember it when they hand out the pink slips;

    Kakistocracy. That’s right. Pure, unfettered, unprincipled and undisciplined KAKISTOCRACY: government by the least qualified or most unprincipled citizens.

  138. WebbyGrl says:

    Congrats AL! Another success. You are my hero. I’m new to the field but I’ve been reading you since my last year of library school. I adore your snarkiness, anonymity, and blunt truthfulness on the career. I especially like that the establishment doesn’t like you. That speaks volumns. Press on!

  139. Jim Rettig says:

    We post anonymously, because if you put your name here, it can be hi-jacked and people can post any old crap they want under your name.

    By the way, I am NOT Jim Rettig.

    I am just making a point.