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A Library School By Any Other Name

Last week was the most exciting thing to come out of New Jersey since Frank Sinatra. Well, maybe not quite that exciting, but a lot of librarians were interested. It seems that the Rutgers library school – or, rather, the school at Rutgers that houses the MLIS program – is going to change its name to become "more competitive." You can read all about it right here at Library Journal. (I never read LJ until I started blogging here. It’s amazing what you can learn about libraries these days.) From the story:

"Another graduate school serving the library field is about to lose the “L” name. The faculty of Rutgers University’s School of Communication, Information and Library Studies (SCILS) voted 30-10 to change the name of the school to the School of Communication and Information."

According to the story, the initial announcement claimed that the New Jersey Library Association had been informed and supported the move. Apparently that wasn’t the case at all, but just something someone at Rutgers made up. Maybe they should consider changing the name to the School of Miscommunication and Disinformation. It’s just a thought.

A couple of my New Jersey informants informed me that a number of New Jersey librarians (mostly Rutgers graduates, as I understand it) were up in arms at the proposed change because, you know, it’s important to have the word "librarian" in the title if you’re a librarian. Perhaps it hasn’t occurred to any of these graduates that none of the Rutgers faculty who voted for this change are actually librarians, which supports my position that there is a huge disconnect between what goes on in libraries and what goes on in library (or information or whatever) schools.

Does the word "library" really matter that much, though? After all, Michigan doesn’t have "library" in its name, and I’ve heard it has a pretty good library school. Of course, neither do Missouri or Valdosta State, so that’s not much of an argument. Let’s reverse this. Illinois still has "library" in its title, and it’s got a good library school. Wait, so do Clarion and South Florida. This isn’t getting us anywhere, is it? No. Let’s move on.

Rutgers says the change will make them "more competitive." Considering they’re the only ALA-accredited library school in New Jersey I’m not sure who they think they’re competing with. Ah, wait. I see it now. They’re not trying to compete with other library schools. They’re trying to compete with other "communication" and "information" schools. The MLIS degree they offer will still be there for those poor folks who can’t escape New Jersey to go to library school in the Midwest where all the really good library schools are, but I’m pretty sure that attracting more library school students isn’t a high priority for them. The library school students will go anyway, because Rutgers seems to be the only public university library school in the region, and thus cheaper than the private university schools in New York and Philadelphia. Library school students might make up 27% of the Rutgers SCILS graduates, but that large minority isn’t going anywhere.

Some librarians are certainly making a big deal about this. According to the article, NJLA president Heidi "Cramer, who noted that NJLA faces more pressing issues, such as a legislative attempt to halve library funding, said that “a lot of librarians are very passionate about deleting the name ‘library.’ It’s not that they’re changing the name. They’re keeping part of the name, and removing the part about libraries.” She said she personally opposed the change."

How strong is this argument, though? Sure, a lot of librarians are passionate about deleting the name, but will anyone else care? If the NJLA and New Jersey libraries are facing such pressing issues as reduced funding, what importance should this minor name change have? It’s not the librarians who are out funding libraries. Do we really think anyone in the state of New Jersey besides the librarians and the Rutgers SCILS faculty care one way or another what this school is called? Will there be a legislator who says, "Oh, the Rutgers library school dropped ‘library’ from the name. Let’s follow suit and drop ‘library’ from the state budget!" Has that happened in Michigan or Washington or Texas or Tennessee?

Let’s consider another perspective. Library schools have nothing to do with libraries, so librarians have no reason other than alumni sentimentality to care what they do. The permanent faculty at library schools aren’t librarians. What they research and teach has only the most tenuous connection if any to libraries or librarianship. This isn’t a put down of library school faculty. I don’t blame them at all. Librarianship has its moments as a profession and libraries have a valuable role to play in society, but teaching library studies must be about the most boring activity in the university. Cataloging? Boring. Reference? Boring. Government documents? Please don’t let me fall asleep. We won’t even mention classes on storytelling or videogames. The faculty in these schools might do some interesting work, but it doesn’t have much to do with us.

Thus, this is nothing for librarians to be concerned about. We are librarians working in libraries, not audience development officers working in infotainment provision centers. The library schools can call themselves what they wish and it will have no effect on us whatsoever. Everyone knows that once you’re a librarian, nobody cares where you went to library school. That tells us something important about the names of these schools. A library school by any other name would still be irrelevant to the concerns of actual librarians.

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Comments

  1. No Bun says:

    I would like to change the name of my degree.

  2. Dr. Pepper says:

    It’s funny to me that a PhD can go teach in library school having been neither a librarian nor a a PhD LIS.

    So what is a library school? Anything that is ALA accredited apparently ;-) I find it funny that I know more about libraries than my MLIS acquaintances but I will not be a ‘librarian’ because I don’t have the MLIS. So if there is no L is MLIS, do we stat saying MS? or MIS?

  3. TwoQatz says:

    My alma mater (University of Texas at Austin) changed the name of its library school to the School of Information. Doesn’t matter much to me – I’ve been doing this for nearly a quarter of a century. Whether they call me Ms. TwoQatz, Librarian TwoQatz or Goddess, I answer their questions, help them navigate the turbulent research waters, help faculty create better research assignments, etc. After all this time, I’m pretty sure the name of the school or my title don’t matter. I’m just that incredibly knowledgeable woman who hangs out in the library and helps people.

  4. MI alum says:

    As an alumnus of Michigan’s School of Information, I can assure you that the do not have a good library school. Shame, too, since many of their other graduate programs are fabulous.

  5. annoyed_library_student says:

    I still find it interesting that everything dealing with libraries and library schools falls under the tutelage of the ALA, as if they have it all figured out anyway. Sometimes I wonder what the library world would be like without them……….Sorry, I was dreaming there for a minute.

  6. Detached Amusement says:

    “I still find it interesting that everything dealing with libraries and library schools falls under the tutelage of the ALA, as if they have it all figured out anyway. Sometimes I wonder what the library world would be like without them……….Sorry, I was dreaming there for a minute.” It looks to me like two “fields” on the edge of the cliff., “professionally”, are trying to combine [tee-hee-hee :-)]. How many have been reading about how newspapers have been cutting staff [Communications]
    almost like libraries in the 80′s/90′s. Is it that these folks want to combine for one final last-gasp student lemming run before the faculty are forced to go out and find real jobs? Hey, if they’re willing, I’ve got a bridge in Brooklyn I can sell ‘em for a logo. And what does ALA have to say about all this? Or are they too busy studying further policy for Darfur? Seriously, what is the direction the field is going to take? I don’t think it knows. It certainly doesn’t act like it too much of the time. Are they going to have a course in Games in this new program? If it’s like “communications” in radio, are they going to have something on how to produce annoying local commercials where
    a local car dealer comes on and yells [crying and begging might be more apt, today, tho]? Or maybe they’ll have the communications folks studying the circulation of cake pans in public libraries [with maybe a schlarly thesis on same;-)]. Whatever, it appears that “Honest Charlie” is in charge now [was all along ;-)], so why worry. “The hits just just keep on coming!!!” Oh wait, what about a bartending class?!

  7. P.F. Falderal, MLIS says:

    Hey MI alum, spoilers: There’s no such thing as a “good” library school. And by good I mean “intellectually exacting in the way that other programs sometimes are”. When people rhapsodize about how great my school is/was I just fix my smile, zone out, and try not to think about how my BA was more demanding than my MLIS.

  8. Feral Librarian says:

    This will do for the library field what the New Jersey Turnpike did for the state.

  9. annoyed_library_student says:

    “Hey MI alum, spoilers: There’s no such thing as a “good” library school. And by good I mean “intellectually exacting in the way that other programs sometimes are”. When people rhapsodize about how great my school is/was I just fix my smile, zone out, and try not to think about how my BA was more demanding than my MLIS.”
    P.F. Falderal, I could not agree more with this statement. I will be finished with my MLIS in December and have not once been intellectually challenged at any point in the year and a half of school. It is really rather sad. I struggle more with having to force myself to do the busy-work, I mean homework. Honestly, I have not learned one new thing either. We have definitely gone wrong somewhere along the way.

  10. Post Postmodern Librarian says:

    Right now it seems the ALA has taken the position that libraries are all things to all people and thus their approved program is designed to touch a little on every thing. This is ok for a short time as you weather the storm of technological and social change but eventually they will have to make a decision. if they are ready this blog they would find two big choices. Information centers based on technology, and Information centers based on old service models. This is not to say either model will not have either of the other two but the focus will have to be decided.

  11. PublicLibGirl says:

    Not entirely sure how this will help make them more competitive. I mean, if you want to go to library school, you’re more or less looking for library schools. Sure, the Index of Majors will list it, but people just starting to look into library school won’t be aware that there is hostility toward the L word, and it’s more likely to be off-putting than attractive.

    Or are they hoping that people interested in non-library-related careers will accidentally enroll and not notice that they’re getting a library degree until later?

  12. meh says:

    Ugh, I am so sick of these identity crises that libraries/librarians/library schools are constantly having.

  13. Mr. Kat says:

    The MLS identity crisis starts with the degree title. Can anyone here tell me why we call it an “MLS” and not what it REALLY is? Anyone? We do this so we can confuse people who have never heard about the MLS about what degree we really hold; “MLS” is a LOT like “MS,” right? And that’s a Masters of Science, a rather IMPORTANT degree!!!

    But the MLS is not an MS…it is an MA…A Master’s of Arts. OOOooooh SNAP! Who are we kidding???

    This little name change is sort of a late game indicator; as if we did not already know, LIBRARIANS are the last voices on ANYTHING in this field. By the time they get to us, they have already made their decision, whether the subject is funding, naming, buildings, or any other fancy shmancy thing that comes our way.

    why do you think ALA can sit there and make zany rulings about anythign itn eh universe and attract no attention outside the library world?

    I bet they could pass a resolution concerning a future Alien Race visiting form outerspace and STILL get nothing more then the “ok children, that’s really nice, but the adults are speaking now” from the higher ups when they present their decree to the world.

  14. sidney says:

    Good library school does seem something of an oxymoron. It’s a hoop. We jump through it to get the challenging, high paying jobs that…. Never mind. I don’t know why we jump through that hoop.

  15. Dr. Pepper says:

    You jump through those hoops for one of two reasons: (1) You wanted to be a librarian since you were a kid and you followed LibSchool because of it -or- (2) you wanted to be a librarian soooo bad that you were dupped by your colleagues into going to LibSchool without looking at the curriculum. I am glad I didn’t go to LibSchool

  16. Geezer says:

    Well, I went to one of those “Midwestern schools,” and even after an Ivy education, there were parts (not all) that had intellectual rigor. However….my degree is *NOT* an MLS, it is an MS in LS. And actually the diploma itself says nothing about library science!

  17. Annoyed and Tired says:

    “You jump through those hoops for one of two reasons: (1) You wanted to be a librarian since you were a kid and you followed LibSchool because of it -or- (2) you wanted to be a librarian soooo bad that you were dupped by your colleagues into going to LibSchool without looking at the curriculum.” Or you might have gone into another field, but were lured into the field by talk of “opportunity” and of people who were “not the stereotypical librarian” being in demand. Guess what boys and girls….? This name change at Rutgers may give them a chance to quietly delete the library part of the program without
    drawing unfavorable press that deleting
    a department might. It’s called “cover your @ss”.Either that or they will astound the world with their font or knowledge an erudition in setting the world straight on the direction of all this.

  18. Original Library Cynic says:

    “You jump through those hoops for one of two reasons: (1) You wanted to be a librarian since you were a kid and you followed LibSchool because of it -or- (2) you wanted to be a librarian soooo bad that you were dupped by your colleagues into going to LibSchool without looking at the curriculum.” Or you might have gone into another field, but were lured into the field by talk of “opportunity” and of people who were “not the stereotypical librarian” being in demand. Guess what boys and girls….? This name change at Rutgers may give them a chance to quietly delete the library part of the program without
    drawing unfavorable press that deleting
    a department might. It’s called “cover your @ss”.Either that or they will astound the world with their font or knowledge an erudition in setting the world straight on the direction of all this.

  19. Morse says:

    I went to library school because I’d failed at everything else. Having said that, librarianship has been very good to me, so I guess I shouldn’t complain.

  20. Grease Trucks says:

    It seems to me that the removal of “Library” from the MLIS at Rutgers is actually quite forward thinking. After all, libraries are no longer libraries in the classical sense; they are now arcades, job centers, yoga studios, cafes… The degree really should be called a Master of Community and Information Studies. Bet the twopointopians would love that.

  21. djork says:

    Whenever I contemplate about going to library school, I come here and the voices of reason speak to me and make me reconsider.

    But seriously, should I? I already have an MA in F#$% All and since I’m working at a library (and liking it) I was wondering if that step toward an MLIS, MLS, MCIS, M-whatever you wanna call it is worth the time and hassle to get that Librarian title.

  22. AL says:

    We librarians encourage others to pursue their dreams of librarian glory. I say, Go! Some day you might be as satisfied and successful as the Annoyed Librarian.

  23. djork says:

    I aspire to be like you, AL.

  24. AL says:

    You’re only human.

  25. Library Observer says:

    If you are already in something you like and think there is a future at it WHERE YOU ARE, go for it. On the other hand, my experience has taught me that it can be a minefield. I certainly wouldn’t want to encourage someone WITHOUT actual library work experience to go for a degree. It’s hard enough for some people with….P.S. Watch your back.

  26. Million says:

    I went to Missouri. The name issue didn’t seem to bother anyone, but I was surprised that the Library Science “emphasis” received as much focus as it did. Granted, we had several MA programs housed together, but there were only three or so professors who dealt with the “Information Science” side of things. The discipline split – in spite of the school and degree name – seemed more rigid than the degree name hinted.

    I’m happy overall with my experience, but looking back it does feel like there were a few folks overly enamored with “library culture.” Interestingly enough they were students and they seemed like the ones keeping the old-guard approach alive.

  27. Million says:

    “It seems to me that the removal of “Library” from the MLIS at Rutgers is actually quite forward thinking. After all, libraries are no longer libraries in the classical sense; they are now arcades, job centers, yoga studios, cafes… The degree really should be called a Master of Community and Information Studies. Bet the twopointopians would love that.”

    Amen. We’re going to be disseminators of information in 30 years anyway.

    Whatever that means.

  28. ContractLibrarian says:

    I graduated with an MLIS and spent 3 different job interviews in front of search committees saying to each other:
    “Is this the same thing? Can she do a “librarian” job without an MLS? Why exactly are we interviewing someone that doesn’t meet our minimum qualification barrier?”

    After the 2nd time, I stopped explaining things to them. Here’s a new one — I spent $30,000 on a degree where my interviewers are arguing that it doesn’t have the right letters.

    We’re all doomed.

  29. Dr. Pepper says:

    My sympathies with your ContractLibrarian.

    I too have interviewed for ‘librarian’ jobs in my fields of expertise, but I keep getting turned down because I do not have an MLIS. Now why do I want a librarian job? Pay of course! I live in academia. The same job as a ‘librarian’ commands higher starting pay and faster increases in pay compared to any other professional. Identical jobs, more pay.

    I decided not to succumb to getting an MLIS because I neither have the time, nor do I want to spend the time ‘learning’ what I already know. Luckily I see that even in academia librarian positions are falling to the wayside in most areas. CIOs are taking over libraries, traditional librarian strongholds are given to other qualified professionals and so on. It is slow, no doubt, but things are changing.

  30. No Longer Worried says:

    Along with my library job, I had to agree to take a number of courses, some of which started before the job did. I admit I was worried when the courses bored me to tears. Had I made the wrong decision in taking my job? Would I be bored with that, too? The answer to both of those is ‘no’, but that’s because library school really isn’t all that connected to what I do for a living. Thank God.

  31. Confused says:

    So…if library school isn’t connected with what you do as a librarian…then why pay the 30K (more or less) to get the degree?

  32. coral says:

    “This name change at Rutgers may give them a chance to quietly delete the library part of the program without drawing unfavorable press that deleting a department might.”

    We can only hope. For real, there are too many library schools, graduating far too many new librarians for the jobs that are available. It’s unethical.

    Also, point of fact: They aren’t taking the “L” out of the degree’s name. It’s still an MLIS. They’re just taking “Library” out of the school’s name.

  33. Mr. Kat says:

    Becasue without the degree from the MLIS Puppymill, you supposedly can’t even get to the interview for a good job.

    It’s a Doorkey – to what is rapidly becoming a revolving door that simply returns you out the way you came – or perhaps even no door at all.

  34. Breathes with mouth closed says:

    Let’s face it, lib school is challenging. Staying awake in cataloging class is challenging. Not killing classmates is challenging. A good friend who is an excellent librarian once described lib school as ”

  35. Breathes with mouth closed says:

    Interesting that my post was cut off just as it read “across between junior high and prison”.

  36. MN Book Gal says:

    Well, all these posts are very interesting. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Library Science and Audiovisual Instruction from the University of North Dakota in 1993. My class was the last class to graduate from that department. I have looked into Master programs on and off, but the $$$$ are really deterring me.

    I am a school librarian for grades PreK-12 and have no aides and only a few stalwart volunteers to help me out.

    I don’t have time to putz around with school on top of it. ALA is really heavy-handed on the Master’s degree thing. I’ve been told more than once that I’d just go through the same stuff I did for my Bachelor’s. So what’s the point?

  37. Mr. Kat says:

    Breathes with mouthclosed, it’s because the form timed out as you were typing your reply; everything after a special character such as ‘, “, or a html bracket, is automatically cut off – which in my case can be entire volumes…yipes…

    the solution is to post very quickly or to use word to compse your post. Copy and paste the post into the reply, hit post, and then scroll to the bottom to verify that your comment posted. If the comment did not post, you will notice the cut was done – you pasted into a timedout form. Simply repaste your reply over whatever is in the box and hit post a second time – the form should be fresh this second time through.

    LJ is hoping the IT department is working on a real solution. They might have to get more IT soon…

  38. Morse says:

    $30K for a library degree? That’s outrageous. I didn’t pay a think for mine, and it was worth every penny.

  39. C. Bradbury-Scott says:

    The removal of “library” from the names of these schools is just the next stage in the parasitic development of “information science” programs that began decades ago. I just wish that the IS people would finish off their hosts already; the fewer library schools the better.

  40. Auntie Nanuuq says:

    “School of Communication and Information.” Freaking makes us sound like Therapists (which we are at times). However, unlike Therapists I suppose we are not going to receive $120 an hour salary!

    We ARE LIBRARIANS, we work in Libraries. What a bunch of Dummy Heads. Maybe we should change their title from Professor to Teacher or, better yet, Imparter of Information!

  41. Amy NJ Librarian says:

    Library schools really don’t want to admit that they are preparing people to work in Libraries. Information Technology etc is so much more 21st century. As you must realize by now Libraries are just a relic as are traditional librarians-fuddy duds-they’ll take the money but that’s it. I went to Michigan when it was still the Library and Information School but even then technology was where the administration’s priorities were it’s gotten worse since then. I think the schools have an inferiority complex ALA should stop giving accreditation to any school that takes Library out of it’s name-bet that will stop it.

  42. Rutgers MLIS Student says:

    I think it is hilarious that anyone cares about this. I don’t even know why I took the time to read the LJ article or the AL blog post. To all my peers in the Rutgers MLIS program: Get a life. No one cares about libraries or librarianship. Get over it. All the rah-rah BS is making me sick.

  43. AL says:

    You’re so mean!

  44. Anonymous Commenter says:

    I have a feeling the present economy will take care of matters, about like it did in the 80′s and early 90′s. The recessions then took out 1/3rd of the accredited MLS programs. That’s also when the big “Librarian Shortage” story hit the media. If anyone thinks that’ll work again….:-/

  45. Another Anonymous Commenter says:

    I have one of those degrees that isn’t an MLS — It’s an MA in Information Resources and Library Sciences. Every time I apply for a job, I have to request a letter from my University explaining what an MA in IRLS is. 10 years ago, when I got my degree, the head of the school assured us all that *all* library schools would be making similar adjustments. Still waiting for that one….

    And FYI, you get the degree, at least in public libraries, because if you want to be promotable past a Library Assistant position (my city tops out at LAIII) you have to have the MLS. Is that fair? Probably not, but, it is, and if you want to be a ”

  46. bookwrangler says:

    Get over it people, the name of your hoop doesn’t matter…it is just a hoop. (And I genuinely feel bad for those of you who had to buy the $30,000 hoop.) You learn the real stuff on the job. (Like how to be nice to people and unclog toilets.) I graduated from U of M before the school became just SI and Amy is right, it was already overly tech oriented. I went from the U of Mac where everything was already being digitized to running a district library in Northern MI where I had to dial-in down to Saginaw to get internet access. Most of the classes I took in library school didn’t apply. (How to get the best results on DIALOG? Come on, get real.) If I hadn’t worked in libraries through undergrad and grad school, I would have been more sunk than I was.

  47. Dr. Pepper says:

    I think that the big thing here is substitutability. Jumping through hoops should be worth something – you’re getting knowledge out of it that can be applied. Anyone who wants to be a ‘manager’ doesn’t have to have an MBA. Anyone who wants to be a computer person doesn’t have to get an MS in computer science. So why can’t people without an MLIS go beyond the library assistant position?

    Knowledge gained in non-traditional ways (i.e. not through an MLIS) should count for something, just like it does in other fields.

  48. Mr. Kat says:

    Thankfully Dialog got bumped by something called “Google;” mind you, they still tried to push searching methods in Grad school as if no one does advanced searching or ever read the Google advanced search help pages.

    It would be like if I was being taught cursive writing only in a college class and as if I had never seen it before.

    The reasoning to teach this material at the master’s level is so that everybody knows it, including those who have never been exposed to such material. Regardless, in other majors they don’t piddle around and wait for everyone to get basic competance – you get that in 100 level classes – and if you need extra help after the 100 level, they offer workshops and office hours.

    MLS classes are of the 500 level. My very first 400 level course in my undergraduate career was degrees of ten harder then any class I took for my MLS.

  49. workerb says:

    As a Library assistant, I can’t see much benefit of the masters degree. Sorry to anyone who spent the 30k. I do exactly the same things as the Librarians at the public library where I work, except manage people (yuck) and churn out the weekly schedule. I love where I work, but its mostly customer service, some basic computer knowledge and the ability to alphabetize and/or count. I’ve done a good deal of programming too. But most of those ideas came from my experience working with kids.

    Considering most library systems around the county are being downsized,branches being closed etc.my own included(even our public schools aren’t required to staff the *media center* with a *media Specialist*)would anyone really recommend getting a MLS,MLIS, etc? When I got my current position as a LA I thought for sure I would go for my masters while working at my current part time position. Now, it doesn’t seem worth it. Thoughts?

  50. Dr. Pepper says:

    I’ve been working for a library for five years now. I don’t have an MLIS, but through my undergrad and grad degrees (management/IT and education), and by working in the library (circulation, interlibrary-loan, systems and reference) I know the culture, I know the job pretty well. There *are* interesting classes in major library schools, but they all require me to do the grunt work which I have covered either through working at a library, or through my previous education (undergrad and grad). By the time you are done wasting your time and money with grunt classes, you have 2 electives. This time and money investment is not worth it for me.

  51. Kat says:

    For what it’s worth, VSU’s program is called Masters of Library and Information Science. It does not completely leave out “library” as the AL stated.

  52. Former Rutgers MLIS Student says:

    Seriously, it doesn’t matter. The Rutgers program will suck no matter what they call it. My undergraduate degree was ten times more challenging than my MLIS at Rutgers. While I found some of the faculty to be helpful and insightful, many of the students they accepted into the program were far below my expectations.

  53. Employed MLIS Grad says:

    My MLIS program emphasized how HARD it was – be prepared to work hard, this will be much harder than your undergrad, etc, etc. My undergrad is in engineering from the #2 school in the country – could it really be harder than that? Um, no.

    I had to take a class on Microsoft Office – a grad level class on how to use software programs. How quaint!

    I graduated this December with a 4.0 and now have a full-time job. Of course, it has nothing to do with my earning an MLIS – I was hired because I have a BSE (that’s bachlors of science in engineering). At least I have a job…

  54. mh says:

    Yeh, all the good library schools are in the Midwest.

  55. Toronto student says:

    My Master’s degree cost $15,000 over two years and I’m starting to wonder about it. Sure, I had no prospects with my humanities background (BA and MA in history – come on!). I’m thinking that it was a waste. I’m still looking for work in the field – I’ll be graduating in a few months.

    My program is getting reviewed by the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies soon and I think I shall be rather critical. From what I can see, almost all science/engineering *undergraduate* programs are harder, teach more etc.

    I’m now thinking to get into the computer science side of things. Assuming I can rebuild my shattered morale after reading this blog – I hadn’t read it for months and months and thus felt relatively happy about my program and profession. So much for that.

  56. Darren E. says:

    The library school at UNT recently merged with the education school to create the College of Information, Library Science, and Technologies. When I received my degree in 2003 from the SLIS at UNT, it was a Master of Science. This reflects the technical nature of the UNT program. Further, there is no mention of library science on the diploma. Sadly, no matter the letters on the diploma, the pay of librarians lags terribly behind other graduate level professional jobs. I can understand the frustration expressed here.

  57. Darren E. says:

    The library school at UNT recently merged with the education school to create the College of Information, Library Science, and Technologies. When I received my degree in 2003 from the SLIS at UNT, it was a Master of Science. This reflects the technical nature of the UNT program. Further, there is no mention of library science on the diploma. Sadly, no matter the letters on the diploma, the pay of librarians lags terribly behind other graduate level professional jobs. I can understand the frustration expressed here.

  58. Tanya Feddern-Bekcan says:

    One of the reasons I chose University of South Florida over Florida State University is because they kept “Library” in the degree title (Library and Information Science).