Annoyed Librarian
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Inside Annoyed Librarian

Librarians are Like Social Workers, at Least in LA

According to AL Direct, the School if Information Science at LSU is going to be combined into a new department with the schools of education and social work. That should do a lot to raise its intellectual profile on campus and increase the intellectual rigor of the program. I was thinking about this in relation to my post on academic librarians desperate to be loved by the "faculty" while not really being taken seriously. It should hardly be surprising that real faculty don't consider librarians to be real faculty. Would they consider someone with a master's degree in social work or education to be "real" faculty? Maybe it's just in Louisiana that librarians are considered the equivalent of school teachers and social workers. Not that there's anything wrong with school teachers and social workers; I just don't consider anything I do similar to what social workers do. In my library snob way, I guess I also think it's more important to have librarians than social ...
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At Least the Library Schools Thrive

To pick up where we left off, there's something of a recession going on, and even if things in the library world aren't as bad as they might be, the dire recklessness in the air might still prompt some people to perform bold actions they might not normally perform, like cutting library staffs the bone so we can all be "leaner and meaner." If we're looking at places to cut to the bone, I wonder if anyone has considered library schools. These are schools that exist to train librarians, and yet over the years they've morphed into departments of professors working on just about anything but librarianship. There are certainly some professors who still actively engage with the profession, but even many of them devote themselves purely to technology or video games or whatnot. From what I can tell, the meat and potatoes classes necessary to succeed as a librarian are just as often taught by adjuncts or part time instructors who are also librarians as they are by the professors of ...
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Don’t Count on those Retirements

"If you truly are an old librarian, then you need to retire so that a young person can have a shot at fixing all the mistakes you have made.  Have a nice day." That was a comment from one of last week's posts. This seems one of the most unrealistic comments ever made on the blog, and since I'm in a gloomy mood I wanted to examine it. First, it assumes that old librarians somehow need to retire. Even before the recession hit, there were a bunch of grumpy younger librarians who had been duped into paying for library school because they believed the propaganda about jobs aplenty in the field because of the alleged librarian shortage that somehow never manifested itself. All the older librarians were going to retire. That was the story. (And apparently some idiots still believe the lies.) Somehow this belief turned into a resentment against older librarians for not retiring. Supposedly they have a duty to move aside for the youngsters. Unfortunately for the youngsters, ...
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The ALA Political Machine Shuts Out the AL

This is just too much. I've been trying to figure out all year how to get my name on the ballot for ALA President, and there were no opportunities. Sure, I could nominate myself, and did! Did anything happen? Absolutely not. So I started exploring other options. Could I petition? Could I have a thousand voters sign to get me on board? I couldn't find any rules about it. So, finally, I offered myself up as a write-in candidate. It turns out they don't allow write-in candidates! Yesterday I went down to the ALA polling station at my local public library to cast my ballot for the Annoyed Librarian as President and about 4600 other people for ALA Council. The poll monitor handed me my ballot and I secreted myself into the curtained booth, only to find there were no spaces for write-in candidates. I went out and asked her about it. She said of course there were no write-in candidates. I asked just who decided the candidates on the ballot, because there sure wasn't a primary process. She ...
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A Vote for Me is a Vote for Change!

Those ALA members amongst you probably know that it's ALA election season. We're all on the edge of our seats waiting for the results, because there's nothing more important for the future of the organization, nay, the future of the entire profession, than the results of the latest ALA election. So you should all vote, if not for me, then at least for the children. Because I think the leadership within the ALA is of vital importance to us all, I would like to offer my services. I offer to run as a write-in candidate for the highly coveted office of ALA President, mainly because I want to take advantage of the chauffeur, ALA Secret Police protection, and lifelong pension that come with the position. Why should you vote for me? Because a vote for the Annoyed Librarian means a vote for change! Voting for the other candidates means change as well, sort of by definition, but not as much change as a vote for me would, and change is the most important thing in politics, because the masses ...
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I Am an Unconference, and So Are You

I've been wanting to write about the subject of "unconferences" for a while, but until recently I couldn't figure out why they annoyed me. If something doesn't annoy me, it rarely makes it into the blog. After all, I'm not going to write an entire post about things that don't annoy me - such as martinis, coffee breaks, and foot massages, to name a few of the things I like most about my job. (And as always, thanks to Chip, the best personal assistant ever!) Still, some people think this topic is actually worthy of discussion, as if the concept of an "unconference" were something that required sophisticated analytical skills to figure out. At first I thought, gee, this is just another stupid attempt by some librarians to draw attention to themselves by describing something old with a fresh neologism. It turns out I was right, and that's enough to get annoyed about. Are there librarians out there who really think they're doing something new? Do they really think the ...
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