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Our Oregonian Future

Ah, recovery. Memorial Day is the day when Americans commemorate the American war dead by eating hot dogs and drinking beer. I had neither beer nor hot dogs, but it was a festive day nonetheless.

Library news from the Beaver State never seems to be good. Other news from the Beaver State might also be bad, but other than the library news I really don’t care. The library system in Hood River County is closing down because voters won’t support it, as their library website announces.

(From the url, the county could also be called Hoo Driver County, which would be much funnier.)

Oddly enough, the Oregonian anti-library disease seems to be spreading across the border to California, where Siskiyou County might close their libraries entirely. I almost lumped Siskiyou County in with Hood River County because of the typically shoddy local reporting that still thinks the only people who read news sites live in the area.

Anyway.

Siskiyou county residents are also mad as hell, and they’re not going to take it anymore. It probably didn’t help public relations that the unionized library employees have decided they’d rather have all the libraries closed than go without a cost-of-living adjustment for a year.

It’s hard not to be a little sympathetic to the librarians. After all, despite their unionization, in most places they haven’t won much more than job security. It’s not like public librarians are paid that well compared to the cost of living in their communities. However, it’s pretty clear that their compensation, along with all the other costs associated with running libraries, is still more than some communities are willing to pay.

Somewhere recently I read an argument that library cuts are good because they get rid of the fat, and in another place someone suggested that libraries need to get “lean.” I don’t really buy either of these arguments. Libraries need to be more focused, but many of them couldn’t be that much leaner.

If I were one of the few Oregonians willing to pony up a few dollars for the public good, I’d be very concerned about the closings and the future. Unlike cutbacks, closings are hard to reverse.

Oh, I know it’s been done in Oregon. A few years ago, in the middle of boom times for most of the country, Jackson County closed down their library system for a while because voters wouldn’t fund it.

The Jackson County library system eventually reopened under LSSI, much to the consternation of some librarians who would prefer communities not have libraries at all if they’re not staffed by unionized librarians, like some of the Siskiyou librarians.

However, sometimes Oregonians miss the boat, like those in Damascus, OR, who voted two years to opt out of the Clackamas County special library district being formed two years ago. When, surprisingly, the county voted to form the district, some of the residents had an epiphany, just like St. Paul on the road to…oh, never mind. The Damascus residents realized that unless they ponied up, they wouldn’t get library service, so now they’re trying to become part of the system.

Some Americans out west think that they represent the future. Something happens in California or Oregon, and it’s a harbinger of things to come in the rest of the country at some point. California has proved most prescient in this regard, from pet rocks to state fiscal insolvency, but I’ve seen similar arguments about Oregon.

If the Oregon, or Oregono-Californian opposition to funding libraries is the future, then the future is bleak indeed. The rest of the country, even formerly civilized places, can then enjoy all the benefits of rural and small-town life…like ignorance, poverty, and nosey neighbors.

Which is why I would hope the rest of the country doesn’t follow the folly of eliminating libraries completely. Cuts are bad enough, but cuts can be reversed, and at the worst they don’t render false the hope that libraries do provide for some small portion of the community. Libraries can be small, shrunken places and still serve their basic mission.

This might be bad for the librarians, which is why they not only protest cuts but sometimes to refuse to share any fiscal pain. But the library transcends the librarians. Library closings would be a bad future for many Americans.

Maybe the Oregon mess will provide more opportunities for LSSI and similar companies, and given the tenor of the times, I can see this as a possible future .

There seems to be a huge contingent of radicals who oppose all public services, and who think they should all be privatized if not outright eliminated. Perhaps librarians should adopt the same mentality, and sell out to groups like LSSI. This has the benefit of appearing to be privatized while still being funded by the public.

Of course, like all privatization, it gives only the appearance of not being public, while removing oversight and control from public, but at least it’s cheaper!

Maybe that’s what libraries should to do adapt to the radical, anti-social times we seem to be living in. They should all “privatize” themselves or just close down completely. This could be our Oregonian future.

Library news from the Beaver State never seems to be good. Other news from the Beaver State might also be bad, but other than the library news I really don’t care. The library system in Hood River County is closing down because voters won’t support it, as their library website announces. (From the url, the county could also be called Hoo Driver County, which would be much funnier.)

Oddly enough, the Oregonian anti-library disease seems to be spreading across the border to California, where Siskiyou County might close their libraries entirely. I almost lumped Siskiyou County in with Hood River County because of the typically shoddy local reporting that still thinks the only people who read news sites live in the area.

Anyway.

Siskiyou county residents are mad as hell, and they’re not going to take it anymore. It probably didn’t help public relations that the unionized library employees have decided they’d rather have all the libraries closed than go without a cost-of-living adjustment for a year.

It’s hard not to be a little sympathetic to the librarians. After all, despite their unionization, in most places they haven’t won much more than job security. It’s not like public librarians are paid that well compared to the cost of living in their communities. However, it’s pretty clear that their compensation, along with all the other costs associated with running libraries, is still more than some communities are willing to pay.

Somewhere recently I read some argument that library cuts are good because they get rid of the fat, and in another place someone suggested that libraries need to get “lean.” I don’t really buy either of these arguments. Libraries need to be more focused, but many of them couldn’t be that much leaner.

If I were one of the few Oregonians willing to pony up a few dollars for the public good, I’d be very concerned about the closings and the future. Unlike cutbacks, closings are hard to reverse.

Oh, I know it’s been done in Oregon. A few years ago, in the middle of boom times for most of the country, Jackson County closed down their library system for a while because voters wouldn’t fund it.

The Jackson County library system eventually reopened under LSSI, much to the consternation of some librarians who would prefer communities not have libraries at all if they’re not staffed by unionized librarians, like some of the Siskiyou librarians.

However, sometimes Oregonians miss the boat, like those in Damascus, OR, who voted two years to opt out of the Clackamas County special library district being formed two years ago. When, surprisingly, the county voted to form the district, some of the residents had an epiphany, just like St. Paul on the road to…oh, never mind. The Damascus residents realized that unless they ponied up, they wouldn’t get library service, so now they’re trying to become part of the system.

Some Americans out west think that they represent the future. Something happens in California or Oregon, and it’s a harbinger of things to come in the rest of the country at some point. California has proved most prescient in this regard, from pet rocks to state fiscal insolvency, but I’ve seen similar arguments about Oregon.

If the Oregon, or Oregono-Californian opposition to funding libraries is the future, then the future is bleak indeed. The rest of the country, even formerly civilized places, can then enjoy all the benefits of rural and small-town life…like ignorance, poverty, and nosey neighbors.

Which is why I would hope the rest of the country doesn’t follow the folly of eliminating libraries completely. Cuts are bad enough, but cuts can be reversed, and at the worst they don’t render false the hope that libraries do provide for some small portion of the community. Libraries can be small, shrunken places and still serve their basic mission.

This might be bad for the librarians, which is why they not only protest cuts but sometimes to refuse to share any fiscal pain. But the library transcends the librarians. Library closings would be a bad future for many Americans.

Maybe the Oregon mess will provide more opportunities for LSSI and similar companies, and given the tenor of the times, I can see this as a possible future .

There seems to be a huge contingent of radicals who oppose all public services, and who think they should all be privatized if not outright eliminated. Perhaps librarians should adopt the same mentality, and sell out to groups like LSSI. This has the benefit of appearing to be privatized while still being funded by the public.

Of course, like all privatization, it gives only the appearance of not being public, while removing oversight and control from public, but at least it’s cheaper!

Maybe that’s what libraries should to do adapt to the radical, anti-social times we seem to be living in. They should all “privatize” themselves or just close down completely. This could be our Oregonian future.

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Comments

  1. Chesterton says:

    Maybe if they showed the voters the “Librarians Do Gaga” music video the University of Washington’s School of Information made it would convince them of the worth of libraries and librarians. It’s on youtube.

  2. sharon says:

    For at least a couple of years now you have railed against public libraries. The public agrees with you. They have Amazon and Powell’s and Netflix and a host of other on-line retailers to supply them with the information that formerly only the public library and full-price stores could supply. What do they need libraries for? You were right. You win.

  3. noutopian says:

    The way I see it, areas dominated by liberals will have public libraries and the rest of the country can seek enlightenment on a diet of talk radio and Fox News.

  4. me too says:

    One more stone in the wall between the rich and the poor. Shut down the public library because I can either buy what I need from Amazon or get the information off the internet. Who gives a shi_ about the people who can’t afford to buy what they need.

    LSSI sucks. They are like scabs brought in as strike breakers. Woody Guthrie would be supporting our cause now. Ask people who know — the ardent users of public libraries that have been taken over by LSSI. Ask them how service is now compared to when the library was managed at the local level.

    Let me say it one more time: LSSI sucks

    I live in Oregon and most Oregonians love and support thier public libraries.

  5. rachel says:

    dude, your feed doesn’t work any more. notice how you only have a handful of comments on this post compared to your usual? it’s cause no one can find you!!
    and wtf is up with the teeny tiny type??

    [AL: It's not me. It's LJ.]