Annoyed Librarian
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Inside Annoyed Librarian

The New Trend in Library Use

When I’ve talked about porn in libraries before, I never has this in mind. In case you haven’t heard the story, a former student at Oregon State University made a risque video in the university library for a sex chat website and is now facing charges of public indecency. As the article says, “She faces up to a year in prison and a fine of more than $6,000 if found guilty.” After I read the story, two different trains of thought started, each heading towards the other, one at 54 mph and one at 45mph, and they’re 12 miles apart. I’ll let you do the math. Until then, the trains. First of all, that seems like a steep charge. Yes, she recorded herself baring her breasts and masturbating in the library, presumably neither of which required removing all her clothes. (I haven’t seen the video, but if you have a link please don’t post it in the comments.) That is bad, perhaps even indecent. On the other hand, she was 18 years old at the time and obviously not too bright. As ...
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Time to Beef Up the Security

I knew something bad would happen when libraries got into the videogame business, and now it has: massive theft. I hate to say I told you so, but, no, actually I don’t hate that. I told you so. Okay, maybe I didn’t. One smoky slacker has apparently stolen $14,000 worth of video games from possibly seven different libraries in Massachusetts. At first, he was checking “items out from various libraries using different names and didn’t return them.” It seems to me that would be difficult. Although I haven’t tried to acquire library cards under multiple names, every time I’ve gotten one I’ve needed an ID and a proof of address. Are multiple IDs and proofs of address so easy to get, or are they not necessary in Massachusetts? I guess that twenty-something gamer can do anything, at least anything except get a job so he can afford to buy games instead of stealing them from public libraries. Library workers finally figured out what he was doing and immediately did nothing because ...
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You and Everyone You Live With

A Kind Reader wrote me about an annoying situation in a library that I’d never heard of, the situation that is, not the library, although I hadn’t heard of the library either. I’m curious if this sort of thing is common, because it seems very unlibrarylike. Kind Reader, a librarian herself, was trying to check out materials from her local public library in New Jersey. She lives with at least one parent, which is relevant to the story. When she tried to check out the materials, she was told that she couldn’t check them out the because the parent she lived with owed too much in fines on his or her own library card, and the library had decided to block the accounts of everyone in the household until the fines were paid. When she complained to the library administration about the injustice of the situation, she was basically told, “too bad, that’s what we’re doing.” It does seem strange that the library card of an adult would be blocked because of the activities of a completely ...
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A Proposed Impractical Solution

My last post wasn’t the only response to the protests and woes of the Fairfax County library system. A letter to the editor of the Washington Post also proposed a new option for the library’s future, and it’s pretty funny. The article from the Post “raised an important question that few have bothered to address: Why should libraries continue to serve as Internet access centers?” That’s certainly a question few have bothered to address, because it’s kind of a silly question. Supposedly, cutting the Internet and getting rid of the computers would allow the library system to spend more money on books. That might be true, but since digital content in libraries is gradually increasing and will likely continue to do so, getting rid of the Internet would be getting rid of the content, especially periodicals and reference books. But people aren’t using them anyway. We have the most solid kind of evidence to support this: individual anecdotal evidence. For years, I visited the ...
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Books Every Library Should Have?

Concerned citizens in Fairfax County, VA are protesting as librarians rapidly shrink the book collection. Here are some numbers from the article: The library’s total collection has decreased from around 2.75 million items in 2004 to 2.4 million items in 2013, a drop of about 350,000 books, magazines and online materials, even as Fairfax added two new branches and electronic items to its system. The number of printed items, mostly books, has dropped by about 440,000 in that time, replaced by about 100,000 online items and e-books. If a book hasn’t been checked out for two years, Fairfax library officials review it for possible elimination in order to keep the collection fresh… 440,000 books gone, which even with the addition of “online items and e-books” still means a cut of 340,000 titles. The children’s sections seem to be the worst: The number of children’s books in Fairfax’s 22 branches has also plummeted, particularly outraging the activists. The library had about 1 million ...
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Introspection

Every once in a while the blog gets a comment that makes me laugh out loud. Here’s one from last week from someone who’s apparently a bigger fan of Facebook than I am: Your blog is a sad wasteland of miserableness. Do you think this is clever? Yes, people do these things but you are basically doing the same grandstanding here on your blog, minus the food. Maybe if you enjoyed something you’d be a happier person. Perhaps you should look up narcissism in the dictionary. I don’t want a librarian who thinks that the idea of anyone encouraging reading is a bad idea, that seems a little counterproductive to me. What would make someone leave a comment like that? What would anyone expect from a blog called “Annoyed Librarian”? Chirpy life advice? Videos of puppies? Maybe the commenter wanted me to take a good hard look at myself, to really explore the emotional depths of a blog called “Annoyed Librarian.” Okay. Here goes. Is this blog a sad wasteland of miserableness? Has the ...
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