Annoyed Librarian
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Inside Annoyed Librarian

Turning the Tables

Lots of people like to make fun of the way librarians dress. In fact, I’ve probably done it myself, but I can get away with it because I’m a librarian. It’s when know-nothings from the outside take a crack at librarians that annoys me. Fortunately, the sort of people who make fun of the way librarians are dressed are pretty easy to make fun of themselves. For example, consider this clown rambling about Kirsten Dunst: “It seems like Kirsten Dunst has slowly begun to realize that running around looking like librarians and disheveled hippies all the time does very little for us interested in getting an eyeful of a fine hottie.” An entire worldview is contained in that sentence, a sad, shriveled, slightly depraved worldview, but a worldview nonetheless. Here we have a man, such that he is, who believes that “celeb hotties” exist to give him something to ogle. He believes, in fact, that such women owe him something just because they’re women and he exists. They owe him a ...
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Controversial Speakers

If you want to see the latest thing that makes some ALA Councilors cringe and protest and lose sleep at night, check out this awful film the ALA produced in 1977, The Speaker. Couldn’t sit through it? Normally, I’d sit through it for you, but this time I just couldn’t. The best I could do was skip through and watch snippets, and they were all painful. It’s a terrible film even if you disagree with its message, which apparently a lot of librarians do. Based on the ALA press release, it’s a film about a high school that invites an openly racist college professor to speak to the students about his white supremacy theories, because that totally seems like a plausible scenario, what with all the openly racist college professors around in the late 70s. By then, even the racist professors had learned to talk in code. They wouldn't have said "whites are superior to blacks." They would have said "middle class suburbanites are superior to the urban poor." The intended goal was to ...
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Telling the Pros from the Nonpros

This question is from a Kind Reader. It was more specific, but I’m trying to disguise the identity, so I’m trying to make it completely general. Lots of libraries, both public and academic, have their public service staff share a desk, so that library patrons go to one spot to check out books, ask reference questions, complain about jammed printers, and whatever else it is that library patrons do. From the public’s perspective this does two things. It makes it easier to find the service location, since there’s only the one. And it erases the distinction between the “professional” librarians and everyone else. The second one probably isn’t that important to most of the patrons, at least as far as they know, because to them everyone who works in a library is a librarian. Or perhaps worse. I’ve heard of librarians and other library workers being asked if they’re volunteers, and of patrons being surprised when told that people actually get paid to sit at a desk and ...
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How Many Consultants Do We Need?

Over the past few years, I’ve known or heard about a number of librarians who got tired of their library jobs and wanted to quit working in libraries. That’s understandable. Librarianship isn’t for everyone, even if you can manage to get a decent job. Of course, once you’re a librarian for a while, you’re not really fit to do much else, so what’s next? For a number of librarians, the next thing seems to involve becoming a library consultant. As I heard of more and more people doing this, I had to wonder, just how many full time consultants can the profession of librarianship support? In other words, can people who are only library consultants make a living? I have my doubts. First, there’s the sheer number of library consultants. The Library Consultants Directory Online is hardly exhaustive, but there are about 40 consultants listed in there. If you search Google for “library consultant,” you get 87,400 results. Of course, Google has the same relationship to ...
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How the Communists Make Money

A Kind Reader alerted me to an odd scuffle in the publishing world. It seems some of the same people who would hate Limbaugh’s book aren’t too happy with radical publishers either. Some people think libraries are all about socialism because they let people read books for free. But sometimes, the places that let people read books for free really are all about socialism. The Marxists.org website has a big collection of the works of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels online. However, that collection is a bit smaller than it was, because the actual publisher of the print volumes asked them to take down the Collected Works edition. And boy, were they unhappy. You can read all about it in the Socialist Worker, which apparently still exists. The background seems to be that Lawrence & Wishart received a proposal about how to capitalise on their copyright. They want to make the MECW available to academic libraries in return for payment. Because that’s how all communists in the ...
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And the Winner Is…

A few weeks ago I wrote about some clown who either couldn’t tell the difference between a library book ban and a Twitter protest or else was just a partisan hack who is paid to whine, not think. You can decide on that. The protest in question was about a children’s book allegedly written by Rush Limbaugh that had made it to the finalist list for something called the Children’s Book Choice Awards. Angry tweeters wanted it off the list. At the time, the Children’s Book Council people tried their best to disclaim any control over that list, because the finalists were chosen purely by sales figures. The sales figures themselves were in question, because supposedly Limbaugh donated thousands of the books to various places, which counted as “sales,” because we live in a world where words don’t have meaning anymore. The award givers made a big deal over the fact that when it came to actually choosing the books, it would be children's votes and not sales figures, or even ...
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