December 10, 2017

Meet the “Buzz Whisperer”: Book Pulse Keeps You Up On What’s Trending | Editorial

The book world is always buzzing. But the buzz can be hard to harness for daily, timely application in our libraries. I’m pleased to share that librarians now have a new tool to put to work. Meet LJ’s Book Pulse, launched in October and powered by the deeply experienced and highly creative readers’ advisory (RA) expert Neal Wyatt.

The Academic Mainstream | Streaming Video

Recent trends in technology are dramatically reshaping academic library collections, and while the use of video in higher education isn’t new, the move toward streaming brings a new array of benefits and challenges for academic librarians. LJ recently explored the ways in which libraries are addressing interest in streaming video services.

Hillary Clinton Gives Closing Speech | ALA Annual 2017

An attentive crowd of more than 3,200 listened to Hillary Clinton give the closing keynote for The American Library Association (ALA) Annual conference on June 27. The politician reflected on her time as a presidential candidate and U.S. Senator from New York, but not before expressing how grateful she was to be among librarians in her native Chicago. […]

New Writers Museum Hosts CCF Benefit | ALA Annual 2017

The American Library Association (ALA) Annual conference, held in Chicago June 22–27, got off to a literary start with a sold-out Friday night reception at the American Writers Museum (AWM) featuring poet, author, and activist Nikki Giovanni, to benefit ALA’s Cultural Communities Fund, which supports humanities, civic, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programming in libraries of all types.

The Empathy Builders: A More Compassionate World Through Stories | Editorial

When was the last time you read beyond your comfort zone—whether in point of view, genre, or format? Graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang has focused on doing just that from his platform as the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, a position to which he was named in early 2016. It’s a cause that’s natural for libraries to promote to patrons but also for each of us to consider in our own approach to our personal and professional reading.

Back in the Big Apple | BEA Preview 2017

After zipping over to the windy city last year, Book Expo returns to New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Convention Center and will run from Wednesday, May 31, through Friday, June 2, with the fourth annual Book Con, a consumer-facing, pop culture–­focused gathering for fans, happening Saturday, June 3, and Sunday, June 4. One of the big changes this year is the branding shift—from BookExpo America (BEA) to the truncated Book Expo—in recognition of the global reach of the show.

New World, Same Model | Periodicals Price Survey 2017

The shift to digital delivery of serials content has had a profound effect on the information ecosystem. Powerful discovery and social networking tools expose users to an incredibly rich world of commercially produced and open access (OA) content. Most publishers have explored new ways of pricing their content—such as population served, FTE (full-time equivalent), tiered pricing based upon Carnegie classification, or other defining criteria—or the database model, which treats all content within an e-journal package as a database, eliminating the need for title by title reconciliation. However, in the end, the pricing conversation always seems to circle back to the revenue generated by the annual subscription model.

Jamillah Gabriel, Thinking Outside (and Inside) the Box

When Jamillah Gabriel, African American studies information specialist and the manager of the Black Cultural Center Library at Purdue University, IN, realized that there weren’t many book box subscription services that focused on African American literature—and those that did were targeted to children and young adults—she decided to start her own. In summer 2016 Gabriel launched Call Number, a monthly literature subscription box for adults featuring works by non-bestselling black authors.

Rick Bass Wins The Story Prize

It may have been International Women’s Day, but on the evening of March 8 The Story Prize went to Rick Bass, the sole male author among the three finalists. Bass’s collection, For a Little While, took the $20,000 prize (and an engraved silver bowl), awarded to the outstanding short story collection of the year.

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Aging in the 21st Century

As the vocal baby boom generation gets older, aging itself has become a growing topic of conversation. Libraries—and their raisons d’être—are not immune from this fundamental shift.