November 24, 2014

Academic Libraries

Class Warfare over an Uncommon Carrier | Peer to Peer Review

Barbara Fister

The president surprised many people when he added his comments to the 4 million submitted to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) about whether and how the government should set rules that will shape the future of the Internet. What was surprising was that Obama came out with a short but quite pointed outline of what many of us feel would be exactly the right moves to take. Citizens of all political persuasions have strong feeling about the value of keeping the Internet open. How exactly to do that is what’s tricky. Because simplistic metaphors, such as asking whether Internet access is more like cable TV or like electricity, as a recent New York Times article put it, don’t really work, I thought I’d try and untangle what exactly is under debate.

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Sarah Sagmoen

Photo by Janelle Gurnsey

In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Sarah Sagmoen, learning commons and user services librarian at the University of Illinois Springfield’s Brookens Library. Hired as a visiting instructional librarian in 2009, Sagmoen was managing the reference desk and public computers by the end of her first year. In her third year at Brookens, her work inspired the library to create the position she now occupies. Between her academic duties and a lively student outreach program, she is busy building a strong community both inside the library and out.

MLD: Masters in Library Design, Not Science | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

How many LIS program graduates would identify as scientists, ready to conduct experiments and make new discoveries in information theory, practice, and behavior? Probably far fewer than those who get a library job where they practice design.

Three Press Directors Weigh in on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

up-week_square

As part of University Press week, November 9­­–15, the American Association of University Presses broadcast an online panel on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing via Google Hangouts. Moderated by Jennifer Howard, a senior reporter at the Chronicle of Higher Education, the panel featured Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press; Barbara Kline Pope, AAUP president and the executive director for The National Academies Press; and Ron Chrisman, director of the University of North Texas Press.

Data & Assessment in Academic Libraries – A free, three-part webcast series, developed in collaboration with ER&L

DataandAssesment_Webcast_2014_Thumbnail_Web

A free, three-part webcast series, developed in collaboration with ER&L

Building on last year’s Data-Driven Academic Libraries series of webcasts, Data & Assessment in Academic Libraries will focus on projects that range across various service points. Starting with an in-depth focus on qualitative measures used in libraries, the series will move into how data is being used in innovative ways to inform and make changes in information literacy and reference, and then conclude by looking at measures that impact collection development and discovery decisions in the digital environment.

Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling | Peer to Peer Review

Kevin L. Smith

The word “incentive” appears ten times in the ruling issued last month by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the Georgia State University (GSU) copyright infringement case, but it is slightly unclear in this rather odd opinion just who is the object of the incentive created by copyright. In seven of those ten instances, the incentive is clearly intended to benefit the author. But there are three sentences at the very end of the majority opinion (the other three uses of the word) where the court seems to interrupt its analysis to state that the incentive belongs to publishers, not authors. It is, I think, worth parsing this apparent contradiction in order to guess at how the trial court might think about incentives on remand.

Making More from Less: Data Driven Alchemy at the Charleston Conference

Charleston_conference_logosquare

The Charleston Conference felt bigger than ever this year, with multiple attendees in the halls and elevators commenting on the profusion of programs at multiple venues, the standing room only grounds for popular breakout sessions, and the fact that they could no longer count on seeing everyone they know among the other attendees in the course of the conference. It is equally impossible to see even a fraction of the many compelling programs presented during the event; below is only our impression from the handful we could personally attend.

A Love Note to Keynotes | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

Once, toward the start of my librarian career, I set three different alarms so I wouldn’t miss an early-morning conference keynote. I sense I should be embarrassed by this, as keynotes and keynoters are now spoken of with the genteelly horrified disdain Wodehousian elders reserved for unmarried chorines, but it’s still true, and I am not ashamed.

Looking For Clues: How Faculty Use and Think About Technology | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Gaining insights into how faculty use different technologies in the classroom and for their own research, as well as how they view new modes of higher education, could help academic librarians discover new opportunities to support and collaborate with their faculty.

What I Want from Library Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last column I discussed the various problems that I have with ebooks for academic libraries. Now I’d like to lay out what I want from library ebooks and what it would take for me to switch from print to electronic as the preferred format for books.