November 19, 2014

Academic Libraries

Three Press Directors Weigh in on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

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As part of University Press week, November 9­­–15, the American Association of University Presses broadcast an online panel on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing via Google Hangouts. Moderated by Jennifer Howard, a senior reporter at the Chronicle of Higher Education, the panel featured Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press; Barbara Kline Pope, AAUP president and the executive director for The National Academies Press; and Ron Chrisman, director of the University of North Texas Press.

Copyright Incentives in the GSU Appeals Court Ruling | Peer to Peer Review

Kevin L. Smith

The word “incentive” appears ten times in the ruling issued last month by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the Georgia State University (GSU) copyright infringement case, but it is slightly unclear in this rather odd opinion just who is the object of the incentive created by copyright. In seven of those ten instances, the incentive is clearly intended to benefit the author. But there are three sentences at the very end of the majority opinion (the other three uses of the word) where the court seems to interrupt its analysis to state that the incentive belongs to publishers, not authors. It is, I think, worth parsing this apparent contradiction in order to guess at how the trial court might think about incentives on remand.

Making More from Less: Data Driven Alchemy at the Charleston Conference

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The Charleston Conference felt bigger than ever this year, with multiple attendees in the halls and elevators commenting on the profusion of programs at multiple venues, the standing room only grounds for popular breakout sessions, and the fact that they could no longer count on seeing everyone they know among the other attendees in the course of the conference. It is equally impossible to see even a fraction of the many compelling programs presented during the event; below is only our impression from the handful we could personally attend.

A Love Note to Keynotes | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

Once, toward the start of my librarian career, I set three different alarms so I wouldn’t miss an early-morning conference keynote. I sense I should be embarrassed by this, as keynotes and keynoters are now spoken of with the genteelly horrified disdain Wodehousian elders reserved for unmarried chorines, but it’s still true, and I am not ashamed.

Looking For Clues: How Faculty Use and Think About Technology | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Gaining insights into how faculty use different technologies in the classroom and for their own research, as well as how they view new modes of higher education, could help academic librarians discover new opportunities to support and collaborate with their faculty.

What I Want from Library Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last column I discussed the various problems that I have with ebooks for academic libraries. Now I’d like to lay out what I want from library ebooks and what it would take for me to switch from print to electronic as the preferred format for books.

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Alicia Virtue

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In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Alicia Virtue, electronic services librarian and department chair of learning resources at Santa Rosa (CA) Junior College. Virtue not only manages the website and ILS for both campus libraries and teaches a course […]

Sell Your Ideas Like a Shark Is Listening | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

You’ve got a great idea for your library. You think it’s a slam dunk for success. No one else is listening and you’re frustrated. Maybe you need a new approach.

ITHAKA Sustainable Scholarship 2014 Brings Data and Process Together

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On October 20–21, scholarly nonprofit organization ITHAKA held its annual Sustainable Scholarship conference at New York City’s Wyndham Hotel. The event’s theme, “At the Starting Line,” echoed the concerns of many libraries, publishers, and institutions about the demands for change driven by today’s information marketplace.

How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of the recent revelations about privacy incursions in the latest version of Adobe Digital Editions.