December 4, 2016

Academic Libraries

From Good to Great, as a Leader | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

There’s a difference between being a good leader and a great leader, but it’s not what we might think. Greatness is not just being better than good. It’s about having force and channeling it for a purpose.

Campus Libraries See Increase in Discriminatory Incidents

Notes posted at Reed College's

Between Wednesday, November 9—the day after the U.S. presidential election—and Wednesday, November 16, the Southern Poverty Law Center collected reports of more than 700 incidents of hateful intimidation and harassment through submissions to its #ReportHate page, which launched the day after the election. More than 60 of these occurred on academic campuses, including in libraries, ranging from verbal attacks, fliers, and personal notes containing hate speech to postings on social media. Most of these have thus far been limited to graffiti and property defacement, but at least one student has been physically confronted.

Big Data and Small Steps at the Charleston Conference 2016

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At this year’s Charleston Conference, held as always in lovely Charleston, SC, in early November, attendees seemed in a mood to focus on practical, incremental progress, with sessions on assessment packed with standing room only audiences while questions of where the field is going failed to pull the crowds.

Jenna Hartel | LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award Winner 2016

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On her website, Jenna Hartel talks of “a different character of LIS”—one rooted in positivity, curiosity, and proactivity. It’s what she calls “the bright side of information,” a focus on the upbeat aspect of library studies that has won Hartel, associate professor on the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto (U of T), a special spot in the hearts of her students and fellow faculty members—and the 2016 Library Journal/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award, sponsored by ­Rowman & Littlefield.

Year in Architecture 2016: Open for Business

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This year’s selection of library construction efforts are each unique in their own way, but most share a significant guiding principle: keep it open. The 105 capital projects completed between July 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016, exemplify a dedication to the totality of users’ experience with regard to sight lines, maneuverability, accessibility, and natural light but also in consideration of others’ ideas, needs, and potential. With atria, lots of glass, and coworking and group study spaces, libraries are indeed open for business.

Year in Architecture 2016: Creativity Is a Blank Canvas

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Featuring Brown University’s Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio at the Rockefeller Library; the Bibliothèque Desjardins, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Drummondville; the James Branch Cabell Library, Virginia Commonwealth University; and the Information Commons at the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.

Year in Architecture 2016: Ambiance and Academics

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Featuring the Digital Scholarship Laboratory, Evans Library, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne and the Mendel Gottesman Library, Yeshiva University, New York.

Year in Architecture 2016: Access and Flow

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Featuring the Mary Couts Burnett Library at Texas Christian University, Fort Worth and Summerland Branch Library, Okanagan Regional Library, BC

Year in Architecture 2016: Academic Library Data

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For the Year in Architecture 2016, Library Journal solicited information from academic libraries nationwide that had undergone new builds and renovation/addition projects completed between July 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016. The tables below comprise complete financial and construction statistics for the 13 academic library buildings submitted.

Making a Rough Journey a Bit Smoother | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Among academic librarians there is strong support for the premise that their work contributes to student success. A new report confirms that too many undergraduates experience a rough road with dead ends. Can we help smooth their journey?