December 21, 2014

Academic Libraries

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Cathryne Kaufman

Cathryne Kaufman

In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Cathryne Kaufman. In 2011 she and Brittany Dudek were working in the library at Illinois Central College, a large community college in north central Illinois—Kaufman as library services director and Dudek as electronic resources librarian. In the process of collaborating on a number of programs, they realized that there weren’t enough professional development opportunities aimed at community college librarians, whose needs often differ significantly from those of their counterparts at four-year academic institutions.

Beaten Before We Start | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

I don’t call myself a futurist, though I do find enjoyment and sometimes enlightenment in watching what’s going on in the world and trying to extrapolate toward what academic libraries might want to do about it. I also harbor a strong love for examples of novel services and fresh ideas about longstanding services, though I’m old and scarred enough not to take them quite at face value—there’s almost always struggle and conflict behind the scenes that does not get aired in order to keep the peace among librarian colleagues.

Serendipitous Discovery: Is it Getting Harder? | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Few would argue against the value of serendipitous discovery, especially when it happens in the library. Is it possible that the evolution of libraries and related technology is making it less likely?

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Amed Demirhan

Amed Demirhan

In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Amed Demirhan, who in 2011 revitalized the American University of Nigeria (AUN) in Yola, the capital city of Adamawa, a largely rural state on Nigeria’s northeast border. Within a year of his arrival, […]

Creating the Future of Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last two columns I explored what I called the “mess of ebooks” and explained what I want from library ebooks. In this column I want to discuss a possible future that could be good for libraries and for publishers. Right now everything is in flux. Publishers are understandably wary of selling Digital Rights Management (DRM)-free ebooks to libraries, and the patron driven acquisition (PDA) model some libraries want might not be sustainable for publishers. Libraries are struggling to buy books at all. The library ebook market is in a state of flux. There’s opportunity in chaos, though, and the opportunity here is to create a future that’s good for everyone, from publishers to library users.

EasyBib Compares Two Years of Information Literacy Data

EasyBib_chart

Students’ confidence radically mismatches librarians’ assessment of their skills, two reports from EasyBib conclude, particularly in website evaluation, paraphrasing and direct quotation. Also, students are using the open web less often they were two years ago, and dramatically more librarians are stressing the role of faculty in promoting information literacy. The first report, Trends in Information Literacy: A Comparative View, was published in May 2014; the second, Perspectives on Student Research Skills in K-12 and Academic Communities, came out the following October; taken together, the two reveal some thought-provoking data on information literacy across the country.

Frenemies 2: The Noisy and the Important | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

In a recent column I discussed some of the complexities that we have to deal with when trying to figure out which tasks and processes should be performed as perfectly as possible and which ones can be done to the point of “good enough” and then left behind for more important ones.

Conspiring to Educate: Working together for transitioning students

JOINING FORCES Resources for transitioning learners. (Clockwise from top r.): CCC’s CPL @ Metro banner; a fourth grader working on her Bigfoot Field Guide; CPL @ Metro’s popular collection; community members explore Colorado’s Anything York Street on the Mapleton Public Schools’ Skyview Campus; and CPL @ Metro, located in a former storage room

Today’s learners have more options than ever on their paths to education, but they will also encounter more obstacles. We may live in an age of access to information, but it’s becoming increasingly easy for students to miss out on crucial information during their middle and high school years—a high school diploma is no guarantee that they will be prepared for the requirements of college—and after graduation, especially for those who do not go on to higher education. Working as partners, however, different types of libraries can join forces to help students bridge the gap from high school to higher ed to the workforce while remaining a viable part of their lives.

What’s Your Personal Mission? | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

Good leaders need to be focused and consistent. It pushes them to achieve their goals in a way that followers can anticipate and count on. Having a personal mission statement can help leaders stay true to this fundamental approach.

FSU Shooting Highlights Need for Library Security

Strozier_pc5919

Early in the morning of November 20 a lone gunman opened fire in Florida State University’s (FSU) Strozier Library, wounding three people. Around 12:30 a.m. staff and students inside Strozier called campus police to report that an armed subject, later identified as Myron May, had fired four shots outside the library and in its first floor lobby. Campus Law enforcement arrived in a matter of minutes to find May outside the library. When he ignored requests to drop his gun, then fired on the officers, he was shot and killed. Two of May’s victims were transported to local hospitals; a third was treated and released at the scene. While the incident was tragic for all involved, and for the FSU community as a whole, it was also notable for the many ways in which it averted a worse outcome.