November 1, 2014

The Mess of Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

I’ve run into a few problems with library ebooks lately that have made me even more skeptical of them as complete replacements for print books in libraries. Since skeptics of library ebooks are sometimes considered luddites or reactionaries, I should go ahead and add the disclaimer that I really like ebooks that I don’t acquire from the library. I did a quick calculation of the books I’ve read since mid-January and of those 33 books, 27 were ebooks. Some of them were several hundred pages long, but reading them on a good ereader was generally a pleasant experience.

Swets Bankruptcy Recalls Fallout from RoweCom

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In a case that has drawn comparisons to the RoweCom/Faxon Library Services bankruptcy almost 12 years ago, the court of Amsterdam on Friday, September 19 granted Netherlands-based Swets & Zeitlinger Group permission to suspend payments to its creditors, and on Tuesday, September 23 accepted a bankruptcy filing from the group’s subsidiary—global subscription management provider Swets Information Services

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Kyle Denlinger

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In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, we caught up with Kyle Denlinger, eLearning Librarian at Wake Forest University’s Z. Smith Reynolds Library in North Carolina. Fresh out of library school, Denlinger helped create WFU’s information literacy massive open online course (MOOC) ZSRx: The Cure for the Common Web. It provided easy answers to common questions about online research. Passionate about library teaching, knowing “just enough HTML to be dangerous,” Delinger continues to promote life-long learning through the resources libraries can offer.

Ego Non Te Absolvo: Lifelong Learning Isn’t Only for Other People | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

I found myself drawn into odd conversations with librarians, archivists, and other information professionals soon after I started teaching library school. Not the conversations about how terrible I am and how bad I am at what I do and how whatever I’m doing in the classroom is automatically the wrong thing—those conversations are standard, and I am as inured to that angry dismissiveness as anyone can be. No, the odd conversations I landed in over and over again went something like this:

Understanding the Culture or Establishing It | Leading From the Library

Steven Bell

“Don’t expect to change anything unless you can do it within the constraints of the organization culture” is a piece of advice often given to leaders. Perhaps leaders are better off ignoring it and establishing a new culture.

Charleston 2014 – Coming Attractions

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Thursday, October 9th, 2014, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT / 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PDT
Not making it to this year’s Charleston conference? We’ve got you covered. Join us for this free webcast as representatives from the Charleston Conference, Ex Libris, and Library Journal offer a sneak peek at some of the topics we expect to see trending at the 2014 Charleston Conference.
Register Now!

Keeping Library Content Secure | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Illegally breaking into licensed library content doesn’t require sophisticated hacking skills—just a legitimate network account. Higher education recently discovered such accounts for sale on the Internet. Do we have good options for preventing thefts?

NCSU Libraries Spur Innovation Through Alt-Textbook Grants

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This fall, as part of a $10,000 grant program funded by the NC State University Foundation, NCSU Libraries has invited faculty members to develop alternative course materials. The Alt-Textbook Project is a competitive grant for faculty members to develop free or low-cost alternates to traditional textbooks using open source material.

Collective Wisdom in an Age of Algorithms | Peer to Peer Review

Barbara Fister

Changes to platforms we use regularly are always slightly traumatic, as we invariably discover when we roll out a new library website and the complaints begin, or we find out a database interface has changed radically the day we’re introducing it to students. Platform changes are even more distressing when they are sites to which we contribute content. By creating social circles and sharing information on websites, we often forget they belong to other people who have values and motivations different from ours.

NYPL and U. Penn Partner for In-Person MOOC Support

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Poets through the ages have managed very well without institutional backing. The study of poetry, on the other hand, requires a little more infrastructure. This fall, the New York Public Library (NYPL) will team up with the University of Pennsylvania’s Kelly Writers House (KWH) to provide a physical space for participants in Professor Al Filreis’s […]