May 22, 2016

Make No Assumptions about Trust | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

When employees are asked what qualities they look for in their leaders, trust is always among the most mentioned responses. Employees want leaders they can trust, but they don’t think they have them now.

Fracking the Ecosystem | Periodicals Price Survey 2016

ljx160402webPlacementsChart1

What does fracking have to do with scholarly publishing and journal pricing? While the library financial landscape has improved since the depth of the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009, it still cannot be considered robust. As articles such as this one chronicle annual serials price increases, libraries, publishers, and vendors search for innovative ways to fulfill information needs within the finite, predefined budget environment. New business and access models ranging from the initial e-journal big deal packages, article pay per view, open access, mega-journals, and publisher e-journal database pricing have evolved in response to the environment; libraries, publishers, and vendors have merged, consolidated, or disappeared along the way. Just as fracking keeps the oil and gas flowing, these strategies enable the current scholarly publishing ecosystem to extract the necessary resources—intellectual and financial—to survive.

SPONSORED CONTENT

Library of the Future: Why Data Is King

Proquest Ebook Central

Like many library collections, the one million ebooks in Grand Valley State University Library’s digital stacks originates from multiple vendors (more than 30)—and every one has their different take on digital rights management. “That’s one thing we really struggle with—particularly with ebooks,” says Jeffrey Daniels, Grand Valley State’s interim associate dean of technology and information […]

Flipping Journals, Changing Ways of Publishing

Cheryl-LaGuardia

As a reference librarian, I’m keenly following developments in the Open Access (OA) movement, because I (along with all of you folks also working with researchers) am aware of how journal and serial costs have gotten so large and burdensome to libraries that titles must be cut, and thus, access to important research is becoming ever more difficult for students, faculty, and other scholars around the world. So I was intrigued when I saw last June that Harvard Library’s Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) had awarded a contract to three individuals—David Solomon, Bo-Christer Björk, and Mikael Laakso—to “write a comprehensive literature review on methods for converting subscription-based scholarly journals to open access.” The OSC calls this the “journal flipping project.” When I heard that the preliminary version of their report, Converting Scholarly Journals to Open Access: A Review of Approaches and Experiences, was available for public comment, I took a look at what it says.

Lazarus Project Brings Damaged Texts Back to Life

Vercelli Book

Many libraries, archives and museums have in their collections textual artifacts that can no longer be read. Now a multispectral imaging initiative is uncovering value that can’t be detected by the human eye in ways that were previously only available to the largest and most deeply resourced institutions, and without having to take fragile manuscripts off-site.

ER&L Conference Covers Familiar Challenges, New Solutions

ER&L 2016 logo

The 11th annual 2016 Electronic Resources and Libraries (ER&L) conference featured dozens of sessions and workshops on topics including emerging technologies, e-resource management, collection development and assessment, user experience, and organizational strategies. This summary includes just a few of the sessions that LJ had the opportunity to attend.

Promise and Peril of AI for Academic Librarians | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

It is still early in the development of artificial intelligence but eventually it will change the work of librarians—or make it irrelevant. How likely is it that we will be replaced by bots in the future?

More Needles; Bigger Haystack | Open Access in Action

OAIA_bookstore_shelves

Open Access publishing has led to a proliferation of peer-reviewed articles. Librarians and researchers have a more challenging task when it comes to finding what they need. It has never been a simple task to locate relevant information. Entire disciplines of library science are devoted to the complicated task of indexing and retrieving published findings. However, under traditional models, that process was relatively predictable.

Brown’s FLIP Library Lends Textbooks to Low-Income Students

Textbook lending library for first generation students at Brown University

Since the spring of 2015, Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library has been home to a new lending service—the First Generation Low Income Partnership (FLIP) Library. The FLIP Library makes textbooks available, free of charge, to students who may otherwise find it challenging to cover the high cost of texts required for their coursework.

Librarians Need Global Credentials | Backtalk

Woody Evans

Until there is a body to take responsibility for reviewing LIS programs globally and granting the strong ones accreditation, a large number of librarians will be banned de facto from participating in our increasingly mobile information age economy. Having been a sometimes struggling expat myself (I lived in the UK and in Taiwan before Texas and the UAE), I know a little about trying to find work abroad; it can be a hell of a lot harder than it was for me, especially if you’re brown-skinned and English isn’t your first language. An international standard for accreditation for LIS degrees would go a long way toward fixing this for librarians in the eastern and southern hemispheres who want a fair shot at jobs in the northern and western hemispheres and in the complex, frustrating, bewildering, and lucrative Middle East.