June 30, 2015

Serving Two Masters | Library by Design, Spring 2015

A NATURAL PARTNERSHIP The Tidewater Community College/City of Virginia Beach Joint-Use Library balances unique design against the retention ponds created to absorb rainwater. Photo ©Jeff Goldberg/Esto

Joint-use libraries, especially partnerships between public libraries and colleges, are rare but not unheard of. In an era of belt-tightening, pooling resources with a partner that shares many of your institution’s goals can be a tempting proposition for schools and cities alike. It’s complex, but as seen at the Tidewater Community College/City of ­Virginia Beach Joint-Use Library, opened in 2013, it can also be extremely rewarding.

Adult Learners in the Library–Are they Being Served? | Peer to Peer Review

Makiba Foster, left, and Kris Helbling, right

Like many academic librarians, after completing the marathon of the traditional school year, we often use the summer semester to reflect, revise, and plan for the upcoming fall. In the summer of 2012, during a casual conversation in which we shared stories about rewarding reference interactions, we stumbled upon an “a-ha moment,” discovering an opportunity to connect targeted library outreach with an underserved user group. During this exchange, we realized how much we both enjoy working with adult learners and how they always seem genuinely interested in gaining skills to make themselves better library users, and therefore better students. This conversation became the catalyst for an idea of a library course designed specifically for adult learners returning to the classroom.

U. Minnesota Press, CUNY Grad Center Develop Hybrid Publishing Platform

University of Minnesota Press

The University of Minnesota Press and the GC Digital Scholarship Lab at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) in April were awarded a $732,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to launch Manifold Scholarship, a new platform that will enable the publication of iterative, networked, electronic versions of scholarly monographs alongside the print edition of the book.

Why Internet Searches Are Not Enough | Peer to Peer Review

George Ledin

Historians are used to sleuthing. Obtaining verifiable sources is difficult; original documents may be unavailable. With computer searching methods some of the detective work has eased up, at least superficially. However search engines depend on databases that can be parsed and queried digitally. Whatever is not in these databases is unreachable except in person. Great strides have been made thanks to the Internet, and online techniques are useful tools, but their help is always limited.

The search for Rodríguez’s “Chinese Poem” is a case study in how, despite strong efforts and advanced technological approaches, searches cannot be guaranteed to succeed.

What Will We Do When Students Drop the Big Package Deal? | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

We have multiple categories of students to deal with: traditional, non-traditional, distance, first-gen. Swirlers are an emerging demographic. How will academic librarians meet their needs?

Tests Are Changing: How to Keep Your Collections Up to Date

TestPrep2015_Thumbnail_Web

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Join us as Rosanne Cordell, Lauren Barack, and Barron’s publisher, Bob O’Sullivan, share insights and tips on ensuring your test-prep collections are up-to-date.
Register Now!

K|N’s Open Access Network: Knowledge Made Public

knowledge made public image_square

The Open Access Network (OAN), a project set to establish a business model for OA in the humanities and social sciences, was the topic of a key session at “Knowledge Made Public,” a May 5 conference held at the City University of New York (CUNY) Academic Commons. The session featured a presentation by K|N Consultants principals Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg, who were joined by Martin Burke and Jessie Daniels of the CUNY Graduate Center, and Ken Wissoker, editorial director at Duke University Press, for a lively and informative discussion of OAN, K|N’s newest initiative, which will launch in mid-May.

Getting Back on Track After a Leadership Failure | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

Fail often to succeed, we are told. Good advice perhaps if we are exploring new services or products. When leaders fail often, or perhaps even just once, recovery is difficult if not impossible. Leaders can learn from their failures and move on.

Intersections, Frames, and Lines | Peer to Peer Review

Kevin L. Smith

So many ideas can be sparked by coincidental juxtaposition. In the past few weeks, I have been thinking about the intersections between scholarly communications and information literacy. This was largely because I was part of a panel at the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Conference about the task force charged with implementing the 2013 White Paper on the topic. My specific task was to discuss how the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education illuminated the approach we called for in the white paper. On top of these concerns came the Blurred Lines copyright case, which was all over the media in the past few weeks, and about which I have been asked my opinion repeatedly. Can these different strands be woven into a coherent idea?

Ex Libris Acquires oMbiel, Establishes Mobile Campus Solutions Division

logo for campusM from oMbiel

Ex Libris today announced the acquisition of Wolverhampton, U.K.-based oMbiel, developer of the campusM and governmentM cloud-based mobile app solutions for universities and local government services, respectively. The company will be incorporated into Ex Libris as a new business unit, Ex Libris Mobile Campus Solutions, led by oMbiel founder and CEO Hugh Griffiths. Terms of the sale were not disclosed.