August 3, 2015

Sharing Policy Draws Criticism; Elsevier Responds

436px-Elsevier.svg

On April 30 the academic publishing company Elsevier announced that it would be updating its article sharing policies. In a post on its website titled Unleashing the power of academic sharing, Elsevier’s director of access and policy Alicia Wise outlined a framework of new sharing and hosting policies, which include guidelines for sharing academic articles at every stage of their existence, from preprint to post-publication, and protocol for both non-commercial—that is, repository—and commercial hosting platforms.

Lee Van Orsdel Re-Thinks Library Design

Mary Idema Pew Library

When Michigan’s Grand Valley State University (GSVU) built a new library a few years ago, Dean of Libraries Lee Van Orsdel wanted staff and stakeholders alike to throw out the rulebook on library design. The result was an acclaimed space that has been a hit with GVSU students, driving more traffic to the library and changing how students use it—changes that in turn have even influenced other industries.

Toxic Leaders, Toxic Workers: Learning to Cope | Leading From the Library

Steven Bell

Librarians may not know a remarkable leader, but they sure can name all the toxic ones they’ve worked for. Lots of toxic employees and co-workers too. Is there any hope for a toxic-free workplace?

Sudden Sweet Briar Closure Leaves Library in Limbo

An architect's rendering of the newly renovated library at Sweet Briar College

(Editor’s Note: Virginia’s attorney general announced June 20 that Sweet Briar College will remain open for the 2015–16 academic year. The alumnae group Saving Sweet Briar has pledged to raise $12 million toward operating costs, and the college will release restrictions on $16 million in endowments. At least 13 members of the current board of 23 will be replaced by trustees, and the board will then appoint a new president. See the Chronicle of Higher Education for more details about the agreement.)

Not Liking What Users Have to Say? Listen Anyway | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Listening to members of the user community is important—even if it’s hard to accept what they have to say. Then we need to act on what was heard.

The Future of Academic Law Librarianship | Peer to Peer Review

LawLibrarians

It is no secret that legal education in America faces an uncertain future. A pronounced enrollment decline coupled with widespread negative media attention—especially regarding a lack of practical skills training in law school curriculums—has led the legal academy to consider serious reform measures. As has been predicted ad nauseam by commentators, in the near future, a number of law schools may even be forced to close. As law schools go, so go academic law libraries, and the crisis in legal education has had a profound effect on these institutions. Shrinking budgets and “questions of new missions” have beset law libraries across the nation. But for a number of interrelated reasons, this so-called crisis might be a blessing in disguise.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Kyle Courtney

Kyle Courtney

In our first 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Kyle Courtney. In 2014 Courtney, Harvard University’s copyright advisor, brought together his first cohort of Copyright First Responders (CFRs)—a group of volunteer librarians who spent their summer in his Copyright Immersion Program in order […]

Appreciate Your Higher Ed Curmudgeon | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Academic librarians probably know at least one curmudgeon at their institution—or in their library. A new study explores the nature of curmudgeons in higher ed and why we should appreciate them more.

Researcher: What You Got? | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Let’s take some advice from sex columnist Dan Savage to improve connections between research and practice. Savage’s Lovecast podcast features a segment called “What You Got?” highlighting recent studies from sex and relationship researchers. Savage gives scholars a few minutes of airtime to report on how their findings might relate to listeners. What a brilliant way to get the word out about research! Maybe a similar segment could find its way to Steve Thomas’s “Circulating Ideas” podcast, a show I always enjoy.

You’re a Good Leader, But Are You a Thought Leader? | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

The term ‘thought leader’ tends to be associated with negative perceptions. Perhaps it isn’t as bad as we have made it out to be. What exactly is it, and does our profession benefit from thought leadership? Might you be a thought leader?