July 31, 2016

What Do We Need to Stop Doing? A Survey | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl-LaGuardia

As I look at the many areas in which libraries are working, thriving, and expanding (see Where Are We Headed? An Unscientific Survey, Not Dead Yet, October 15, 2015), the question occurs to me: do we need to consider not doing some things so that we can do those things our researchers need us to do?

ProQuest Acquires Alexander Street

ProQuest and Alexander Street logos

ProQuest subsidiary R.R. Bowker today announced the acquisition of Alexander Street, a leading provider of streaming video and music, as well as primary source collections, to almost 4,000 library customers in over 60 countries. The business will be known as “Alexander Street, a ProQuest Company,” and will continue to be led by Stephen Rhind-Tutt, its current president, and its current management team, including Eileen Lawrence, David Parker and Andrea Eastman-Mullins, from its current headquarters in Alexandria, VA.

Library Field Responds to Orlando Tragedy

Orlando vigil 2

Update: ALA is planning a planning a memorial gathering at the Annual Conference on Saturday, June 25, 8–8:30 a.m. in the OCCC Auditorium, and a special conference Read Out co-sponsored by GLBTRT and OIF. Details on other support activities during the conference can be found here.

In the wake of the shooting in Orlando’s Pulse nightclub on the night of June 12, which killed 49 people and injured 53 others, library administration and staff, organizations and vendors have stepped up with statements of solidarity, offers of help, and opportunities to join forces with the GLBT and Latinx communities—the shooting occurred during Pulse’s Latin night—to mourn those killed and wounded.

Signs of the Times | Product Spotlight

ljx160602webEnisAnodeEndCap

Digital signage has become a familiar sight in retail stores, restaurants, hotels, and other businesses. With large flat-panel televisions now relatively inexpensive, many libraries have jumped on board with this trend as well, using digital signs to display a rotating series of regularly updated images, such as announcements, book covers, or information about upcoming events.

Library of Congress Drops Illegal Alien Subject Heading, Provokes Backlash Legislation

library-congress-logo

Thanks to the joint efforts of a student group and university librarians at Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, with a push from the American Library Association (ALA), the Library of Congress (LC) announced on March 22 that it would remove the term “Illegal alien” from the LC Subject Heading (LCSH) system, replacing it with “Noncitizen” and, to describe the act of residing without authorization, “Unauthorized immigration.” Per LC’s executive summary, the proposed change will be posted on a “Tentative List” for comments “not earlier than May, 2016.” Ultimately the heading “Illegal aliens” will become a “former heading” reference, cross-referenced with the new terminology; other headings that include the phrase will also be revised or canceled. This decision currently stands despite recent backlash: members of the U.S. House of Representatives have voted to attach language to a funding bill which would require LC to switch back to the original term, but the bill is not yet law.

Update: The Library of Congress has posted a survey where the public can share their views on the proposed changes, and will accept comments through July 20.

Please Rewind | Preservation

A SCREAM David Gary, Kaplanoff ­Librarian for American History at Yale University, New Haven, CT, has assembled a unique collection of low-budget horror movies. Yale’s VHS holdings also include thousands of 
irreplaceable interviews. And the 
format is becoming obsolete

Last month, Yale University hosted “Terror on Tape: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on the History of Horror on Video.” Cheap slasher flicks from a bygone era may seem a bit lowbrow for the Ivy League, but David Gary, Yale’s Kaplanoff Librarian for American History, writing for the ­Atlantic last summer, made a compelling case for the university’s collection of 3,000 VHS horror movies from the 1970s and 1980s.

We Need a Growth Mindset for Learning Library Research | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Students are motivated to learn when they believe they have the need and the capacity to acquire and master a new skill. Students come to college thinking they’ve mastered research. How can we help them discover they still have room to grow?

Building Excellence | Library by Design, Spring 2016

ljx160502webAIA1

This year, seven libraries received the prestigious 2016 AIA/ALA Library Building Award, which recognizes excellence in architectural library design. The award recipients, chosen by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the American Library Association (ALA), exemplify how the traditional role of libraries has evolved. The designs of these community spaces differ to reflect the needs of the surrounding residents, which vary according to neighborhood or campus.

Canadian Libraries Help Fort McMurray Fire Evacuees

Landscape view of wildfire near Highway 63 in south Fort McMurray
Photo credit: DarrenRD CC BY-SA

The wildfire that ravaged the city of Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada, for more than two weeks forced the evacuation of some 88,000 residents—many of them making their way to Edmonton, the nearest large city, and some as far south as Calgary. Throughout the area, local services stepped up to help the evacuees, from shipments of food, bottled water, and diapers to prepaid debit cards to a Facebook page that gathered donations of prom dresses for teenagers forced to flee without their clothing. Edmonton and Calgary public and academic libraries did their parts as well, ensuring access to library services, providing library cards to evacuees, and doing outreach at evacuation centers.

SelectedWorks Redesigned for Librarians

Author Dashboard Thumbnail

Academic profile platform SelectedWorks has been redesigned and was recently relaunched as a librarian-facing faculty support tool, enabling academic libraries to manage the creation and organization of consistent, institution-branded faculty profiles that showcase open access articles and other scholarly work. The redesign was the result of “a change in understanding” of how the platform was being used, according to Jean-Gabriel Bankier, president and CEO of bepress, developer of SelectedWorks, as well as the Digital Commons institutional repository software suite and other academic publishing and communication products.