May 3, 2016

More Needles; Bigger Haystack | Open Access in Action

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Open Access publishing has led to a proliferation of peer-reviewed articles. Librarians and researchers have a more challenging task when it comes to finding what they need. It has never been a simple task to locate relevant information. Entire disciplines of library science are devoted to the complicated task of indexing and retrieving published findings. However, under traditional models, that process was relatively predictable.

Brown’s FLIP Library Lends Textbooks to Low-Income Students

Textbook lending library for first generation students at Brown University

Since the spring of 2015, Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library has been home to a new lending service—the First Generation Low Income Partnership (FLIP) Library. The FLIP Library makes textbooks available, free of charge, to students who may otherwise find it challenging to cover the high cost of texts required for their coursework.

Librarians Need Global Credentials | Backtalk

Woody Evans

Until there is a body to take responsibility for reviewing LIS programs globally and granting the strong ones accreditation, a large number of librarians will be banned de facto from participating in our increasingly mobile information age economy. Having been a sometimes struggling expat myself (I lived in the UK and in Taiwan before Texas and the UAE), I know a little about trying to find work abroad; it can be a hell of a lot harder than it was for me, especially if you’re brown-skinned and English isn’t your first language. An international standard for accreditation for LIS degrees would go a long way toward fixing this for librarians in the eastern and southern hemispheres who want a fair shot at jobs in the northern and western hemispheres and in the complex, frustrating, bewildering, and lucrative Middle East.

Carol Diedrichs and Patrick Losinski on IFLA in Columbus

Diedrichs-Losinski_square

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) annual convening is by nature a globe-trotting affair. In the past several years it has been held in Cape Town, South Africa; Lyons, France; Helsinki, Finland; and San Juan, Puerto Rico. This year the IFLA World Library and Information Congress will return to the United States for the first time since 2001, taking place August 13–19 in Columbus, OH. LJ caught up with Patrick Losinski, Columbus Metropolitan Library CEO, and Carol Diedrichs, dean emeritus of Ohio State University Libraries, to talk about best aspects of holding a global event locally.

Purdue Librarians Contribute to 21st Century Grand Challenge Research

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Purdue University recently announced the first findings from its Resilient Communities Research Team, one of five interdisciplinary research projects funded by an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grand Challenge Exploratory Award. The team, which included scholars from the library and multiple academic departments, came together to explore how people’s physical and social networks influence the resilience of their communities during periods of disaster recovery. They also explored the important role that humanists, social scientists, and librarians can play in tackling 21st Century Grand Challenges.

Learning Leadership: Just a Bunch of BS? | Leading From the Library

Steven Bell

There are dozens of definitions of what leadership is, not to mention more books, videos, and blog posts than anyone could consume in a lifetime. Does any of it help us learn to be better leaders?

Bob Dylan Archives to Find Home in Tulsa

Manuscript for "Chimes of Freedcm"
Courtesy of Bob Dylan archives

Bob Dylan is one of the last century’s most influential, and legendary, musicians, with a career that spans from the early 1960s, when he began playing folk music in Greenwich Village clubs, to this year’s album Fallen Angels, expected to drop just before Dylan’s 75th birthday in May. Now Dylan’s archives—more than 6,000 items, including notebooks, drafts of lyrics, correspondence, unreleased studio and concert recordings, films, clothing, photographs, and business contracts—have been purchased by the George Kaiser Family Foundation (GKFF), a charitable organization based in Tulsa, OK, for an estimated $15–$20 million.

Library Robot Coming to Welsh University

Pasi William Sachiti, Ariel Ladegaard, prototype robot

At Aberystwyth University in the United Kingdom, users will soon have a novel means of consulting the catalog at the college’s Hugh Owen Library. Rather than typing their request, or asking a reference librarian, students can be led to the title they’re looking for by a robot with access to all of the library’s holdings.

Email? Texts? Still Searching For the Electronic Path to Students | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

There’s never been an easy way for academic librarians to establish a direct communication channel with students. With fewer students checking email, texting is a better option.

Welcome to Science 2.0 | Open Access in Action

Figure 1: Adapted, with permission, from Dr. Burgelman’s 2015 presentation.

A look at the EU’s newly announced Open Science Policy Platform, and the long-term implications of Open Science for librarians and other information curators. In this series, we’ll be examining the implications of Open Access (or OA) publishing of peer reviewed journal content on academic and public libraries. OA is of course part of a larger phenomenon—the movement to make science itself accessible to everyone. Like OA, Open Science (OS) has broad implications for those charged with the curation of knowledge.