August 1, 2015

TX Library and Archives Commission Receives $7.6 Million Funding Increase

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The Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) is celebrating a funding increase of $7.6 million dollars. On the weekend of June 20 the 84th Texas Legislature increased TSLAC’s appropriation for 2016–17, which includes resources to increase access to the TexShare and TexQuest database programs, and to launch the Texas Digital Archive (TDA), which will preserve and make available born-digital archival documents of the state government. In addition, TSLAC—which oversees statewide library and reading-related disability programs, as well as maintaining the Texas State Archives—gained funds necessary for staff salary adjustments and to implement a new automated accounting and payroll system.

Getting a Bigger Piece of the Fundraising Pie | ALA Annual 2015

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At the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference, ALA’s United for Libraries division presented a well-received session, Getting a Bigger Piece of the Pie: Effective Communication with Funders and Policy Makers. A panel of three experienced fundraisers talked about what is and isn’t working in their ongoing mission to help support their libraries, offering a range of good advice to library leaders and fundraisers at every level.

Sharing Policy Draws Criticism; Elsevier Responds

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On April 30 the academic publishing company Elsevier announced that it would be updating its article sharing policies. In a post on its website titled Unleashing the power of academic sharing, Elsevier’s director of access and policy Alicia Wise outlined a framework of new sharing and hosting policies, which include guidelines for sharing academic articles at every stage of their existence, from preprint to post-publication, and protocol for both non-commercial—that is, repository—and commercial hosting platforms.

In Win for Library Advocates, New York City FY16 Budget Enables Citywide Six-Day Service

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on June 22 an early agreement for the FY16 budget, which includes an additional $39 million for the city’s three library systems across all five boroughs. The funding will enable universal six-day service throughout the 217 branches across the city’s three systems—the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), New York Public Library (NYPL), and Queens Library (QL)—as well as extended hours at many locations, and will translate in to approximately 500 new jobs. In addition, the de Blasio administration has committed to a $300 million ten-year capital budget for libraries.

ALA President-Elect Julie Todaro on Transforming Librarians

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The American Library Association (ALA) 2016–17 presidential campaign concluded on May 8, with Julie Todaro winning the role of president-elect. She prevailed over the rest of this year’s unusually large field—Joseph Janes, James LaRue, and JP Porcaro—by a narrow margin, edging out Janes, the runner-up, by only 22 votes. A total of 10,119 votes were cast for the position of president between March 24 and May 1.

Still Invisible: Despite decades of advocacy, libraries are… | Blatant Berry

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Enjoying retirement, I was watching my second old flick on TCM when Lillian Gerhardt called. She is the former editor of School Library Journal, and we worked together for a decade or more many years ago. Both of us were totally engaged, maybe obsessed, with libraries and the profession and addicted American Library Association (ALA) critics. I was happy to hear that, like me, she was still watching the association. This time she urged me to comment on “The Advocacy Continuum” by ALA executive director Keith Fiels in the May issue of American Libraries (p. 6–7).

Charles Brown: Navigating the Headlines

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When Charles Brown took over the directorship of the New Orleans Public Library (NOPL) in November 2011, the library system, like the city, was still struggling to get back on its feet in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. A native of St. Louis, MO, Brown had previously served as director for the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library in Charlotte, NC, since 2007.

10 Branches Win NYC Neighborhood Library Awards

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NYC Neighborhood Libraries_groupLibrary leaders, staff, friends, and council members gathered May 20 in a grand celebration atop New York City’s Hearst Tower to for the second NYC Neighborhood Library Awards. This year, the Charles H. Revson Foundation and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation teamed up to make the awards even more impactful, doubling the total award amounts and creating strong engagement with library users along the way. The ten winning branch libraries were selected from more than 13,000 nominations. The five winners, which each received $20,000, are: Langston Hughes Library, Corona (Queens); Mott Haven Library, Mott Haven (the Bronx); New Lots Library, East New York (Brooklyn); Parkchester Library, Parkchester (the Bronx); and Stapleton Library, Stapleton (Staten Island).

New Yorkers Rally for Library Funding

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New Yorkers turned out in force at City Hall on May 15 for a lunchtime rally and press conference protesting the deep cuts to library funding outlined in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s FY16 Executive Budget. The proposed budget, released May 7, allocated $313 million for the city’s public libraries—down a full $10 million from FY15, and $65 million less than 2008. A full budget restoration to pre-recession levels would allow libraries across New York City’s three systems to provide core programs and services, and keep neighborhood branches open six days a week, advocates argued. Libraries are also requesting $1.4 billion in capital funding over the next ten years in order to make documented infrastructure repairs.

LACUNY Conference Plans Privacy Protections

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On May 8 the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY) Institute held its annual one-day conference, “Privacy and Surveillance: Library Advocacy for the 21st Century,” at New York City’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice in honor of Choose Privacy Week 2015, May 1–7, sponsored by the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (ALA OIF).