October 4, 2015

Still Invisible: Despite decades of advocacy, libraries are… | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

Enjoying retirement, I was watching my second old flick on TCM when Lillian Gerhardt called. She is the former editor of School Library Journal, and we worked together for a decade or more many years ago. Both of us were totally engaged, maybe obsessed, with libraries and the profession and addicted American Library Association (ALA) critics. I was happy to hear that, like me, she was still watching the association. This time she urged me to comment on “The Advocacy Continuum” by ALA executive director Keith Fiels in the May issue of American Libraries (p. 6–7).

Charles Brown: Navigating the Headlines

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When Charles Brown took over the directorship of the New Orleans Public Library (NOPL) in November 2011, the library system, like the city, was still struggling to get back on its feet in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. A native of St. Louis, MO, Brown had previously served as director for the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library in Charlotte, NC, since 2007.

10 Branches Win NYC Neighborhood Library Awards

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NYC Neighborhood Libraries_groupLibrary leaders, staff, friends, and council members gathered May 20 in a grand celebration atop New York City’s Hearst Tower to for the second NYC Neighborhood Library Awards. This year, the Charles H. Revson Foundation and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation teamed up to make the awards even more impactful, doubling the total award amounts and creating strong engagement with library users along the way. The ten winning branch libraries were selected from more than 13,000 nominations. The five winners, which each received $20,000, are: Langston Hughes Library, Corona (Queens); Mott Haven Library, Mott Haven (the Bronx); New Lots Library, East New York (Brooklyn); Parkchester Library, Parkchester (the Bronx); and Stapleton Library, Stapleton (Staten Island).

New Yorkers Rally for Library Funding


New Yorkers turned out in force at City Hall on May 15 for a lunchtime rally and press conference protesting the deep cuts to library funding outlined in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s FY16 Executive Budget. The proposed budget, released May 7, allocated $313 million for the city’s public libraries—down a full $10 million from FY15, and $65 million less than 2008. A full budget restoration to pre-recession levels would allow libraries across New York City’s three systems to provide core programs and services, and keep neighborhood branches open six days a week, advocates argued. Libraries are also requesting $1.4 billion in capital funding over the next ten years in order to make documented infrastructure repairs.

LACUNY Conference Plans Privacy Protections


On May 8 the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY) Institute held its annual one-day conference, “Privacy and Surveillance: Library Advocacy for the 21st Century,” at New York City’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice in honor of Choose Privacy Week 2015, May 1–7, sponsored by the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (ALA OIF).

New Orleans Votes to Reinvest in Libraries


New Orleans voters went to the polls on May 2 and showed their love for their library system, approving a raise in property taxes that will add up to $8.2 million a year for the New Orleans Public Library (NOPL). A whopping 75 percent of voters approved—a margin of more than 9,000 votes. Starting in January 2016, the 25-year, 2.5-mill property tax increase will allow some branches to extend operating hours to seven days a week, and will help rebuild the 7th Ward’s Nora Navra Library, damaged in Hurricane Katrina.

Library Associations Spearhead New Copyright Coalition


A group of technology companies, trade associations, and civil society organizations have joined forces to form Re:Create, a national coalition to advocate for balanced copyright policy. In the wake of recent proposals to amend the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, as well as constant advances in the field of knowledge creation, coalition members are calling for responsive copyright law that balances the interests of those who create information and products with those of users and innovators, providing robust exceptions as well as limitations to copyright law in order that it not limit new uses and technologies.

Connecticut and Vermont Libraries Await Decisions on Budget Cuts


CT-VTlogoOther than the proximity of the two New England states, the library systems of Connecticut and Vermont don’t have much in common. They don’t share similar funding arrangements or infrastructure. But both states are facing potential budget reductions that could significantly impact their public libraries, and both have called on residents and legislators alike to speak up for their library services.

When the President Visits Your Library


When ImaginOn manager Jason Hyatt got the word on a Friday that his building had been selected as the site of a White House event with President Barack Obama with just four days to plan, he had confidence that he and his colleagues would somehow make it happen.

MO Withheld Library Funds Restored; 2016 Funding in Flux

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Missouri libraries last week celebrated the long-awaited–and surprising–news that Gov. Jay Nixon was releasing almost $6 million in FY15 state aid that had previously been withheld since June, an abrupt resolution to a stalemate that spawned a growing statewide lobbying effort.