February 5, 2016

Culture Convener | Best Small Library in America 2016

Photo ©2016 William Neumann

Once quaint, the Albert Wisner Public Library galvanized support for a new library that narrows the digital divide and powers a roster of nonstop programs

Nicolle Ingui Davies: LJ’s 2016 Librarian of the Year

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There is more than enough evidence to confirm the choice of Nicolle Ingui Davies as the 2016 LJ Librarian of the Year, our award sponsored by Baker & Taylor. Take her special skills at communicating with community members in and outside of the library. Then there is her leadership in building and developing a committed and passionate staff dedicated to patron service. That is complemented by her unequivocal belief that libraries are essential services, not just “nice” assets, and the best medium to achieve an informed citizenry. The results of Davies’s leadership convinced voters in 2015 that they ought to tax themselves to the tune of $30 million a year, increasing the Arapahoe Library District (ALD) budget by $6 million.

Patricia K. Galloway | LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award Winner 2015

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Rarely can one find a professor with such a wide and profound knowledge of the fields and disciplines that relate to applying digital technology to development of cultural archives. Professor Patricia K. Galloway, of the iSchool at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin, takes these achievements several levels higher with her record of original and broad scholarship; her many contributions to research and new knowledge in her practice and belief system of cultural archives and historiography; and the roster of current and former students she has led, instructed, and greatly inspired. Together, these achievements moved the judges to name her the winner of the 2015 Library Journal/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award, sponsored by Rowman & Littlefield.

Manuel Martín-Rodriguez on Intertextuality and Readers

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Manuel Martín-Rodriguez, professor of literature at the University of California, Merced, recently received a 2015 Latino Book Award in the category of Best Latino Focused Nonfiction Book for his examination of Chicano literary history, With a Book in Their Hands: Chicano/a Readers and Readerships (University of New Mexico Press, 2014). Martín-Rodriguez, who was formerly director of Hispanic Studies at Texas A&M University and director of the Roberto Hernández Center at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, is interested in the study of literary tradition framed not only by the books themselves but by readers, reading habits, literary references, and private libraries. Library Journal caught up with him recently to talk about his books and numerous side projects.

New Landmark Libraries 2015: The Reveal

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This year’s round of Library Journal’s New Landmark Libraries returns to its roots, honoring public libraries completed between 2010 and 2014. Below are the lists of 11 winners and 11 honorable mentions in alphabetical order, selected from more than 80 entries. For complete profiles, trends and more, watch for the September 15th issues of Library Journal and Library By Design!

BCALA, BiblioBoard Launch Self-Publishing Award

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Librarians have long sought more guidance on self-published books as well as books by authors of color. Aiming to answer both needs is a new award offered by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA) and BiblioBoard (the company that partners with LJ on SELF-e), called the SELF-e Literary Award.

2015 Gale/LJ Library of the Year: Ferguson Municipal Public Library, MO, Courage in Crisis

Photos by Sid Hastings

The Ferguson Municipal Public Library (FMPL), MO, became a model for all libraries in the way it reacted to the crisis and the aftermath of riots brought on by the shooting of Michael Brown, a young African American man, by local police. FMPL was the one agency in town that stayed open to serve and support all the people of Ferguson. The library quickly became a safe haven and expressed a peaceful resolve, becoming a critical community anchor.

10 Branches Win NYC Neighborhood Library Awards

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NYC Neighborhood Libraries_groupLibrary leaders, staff, friends, and council members gathered May 20 in a grand celebration atop New York City’s Hearst Tower to for the second NYC Neighborhood Library Awards. This year, the Charles H. Revson Foundation and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation teamed up to make the awards even more impactful, doubling the total award amounts and creating strong engagement with library users along the way. The ten winning branch libraries were selected from more than 13,000 nominations. The five winners, which each received $20,000, are: Langston Hughes Library, Corona (Queens); Mott Haven Library, Mott Haven (the Bronx); New Lots Library, East New York (Brooklyn); Parkchester Library, Parkchester (the Bronx); and Stapleton Library, Stapleton (Staten Island).

Small Libraries, Big Impact | Award Retrospective, 2005-2015

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The Best Small Library in America award was created in 2005 to honor libraries that meet the challenges of smaller budgets, space, technology, and collections and still find ways to bring expanded, innovative, and supportive services to their smaller communities. Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, for the past decade the award has encouraged and showcased exemplary work in libraries serving populations under 25,000. Judging criteria include creativity in developing model services and programs, innovations in public access computing, demonstrated community support, and evidence of the library’s role as community center. This year LJ looks back to see how the award has influenced the winning libraries, their communities, and their futures.

Transformed by the People | 2015 LibraryAware Community Award

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In 2010, two young fathers, Forrest Register and Vince Edge, decided that a direct appeal to local government from citizens of the city of Dothan and its surrounding Houston County, AL, could help transform their community into one in which their children would grow up educated and happy and perhaps even want to stay as adults. Their first priority was to infuse new energy and relevance into the lethargic Houston County Library System (HCLS): at the time headquartered at a downtown branch that few people visited, although it was open seven days a week.