October 13, 2015

Librarians’ Picks | Library by Design, Fall 2015


Recently completed building projects offer refreshing and unexpected design solutions to serve patrons.

Product Sourcebook | Library by Design, Fall 2015

ljx150902webLBDG-Rocking Bowl

Library by Design’s Product Sourcebook spotlights a curated selection of newly introduced library furnishings and finishings in key purchasing categories, which will rotate from issue to issue. This edition focuses on library products for children and powered furniture.

UpClose: Rooted in Nature | Library by Design, Fall 2015



The Vestavia Hills Library in the Forest opened in 2010 as Alabama’s first LEED Gold–certified library. The library takes its forest namesake very seriously: fewer than 25 percent of the trees on the site were disturbed in the building’s construction, and no tree more than 40 feet from the building was cut down. Of those that were removed, more than 80 percent were reincorporated into the library itself. The ceilings are made of pine; the entry hall is poplar; the service desks, fireplace exterior cladding, and doors to the community room are made of oak.

UpClose: Alachua Library Keeps Its Cool | Library by Design, Fall 2015


In hot climates, air conditioning is a necessity to keep libraries livable for patrons and staff, especially during the summer. Climate warming is only exacerbating that situation. Unfortunately, air conditioning in turn accelerates climate warming. Now, innovative alternative cooling systems are looking to reduce that environmental impact, and the Alachua County Library District (ACLD), Gainesville, FL, is leading by example.

The 2015 New Landmarks: These 22 public library buildings set a high bar | Editorial


Five years ago, a burning question evolved into what is now the ongoing New Landmark Libraries (NLL) project. Often in conversation with librarians on the verge of construction, I was asked which libraries should be on a “must see” list. Beyond the go-to, big name projects, we at LJ had our favorites recently opened, but our lists were personal and not comprehensive. Hence, the New Landmark Libraries. The national competition was designed to bring forward the excellence in library buildings for celebration, as a tour planner for those approaching a capital project, and as a road map for the next generation of libraries still not even on the boards.

11 Additional Exemplars | New Landmark Libraries 2015 Honorable Mentions


The New Landmark Library Honorable Mentions share an emphasis on light, sustainability, and community connection that will inspire library projects nationwide.

San Diego Central Library | New Landmark Libraries 2015 Winner


Iconic. That word comes up again and again in descriptions of the soaring new San Diego Central Library. A lattice dome tops the warm wood and concrete nine-story structure, a striking presence in the city’s skyline. It is a fitting tribute to the 30 years of effort and almost unprecedented philanthropy from community members that went into creating the landscape-changing new library.

Cedar Rapids Public Library | New Landmark Libraries 2015 Winner


Iowa’s Cedar Rapids Public Library faced disaster in 2008: a “500-year flood” that ruined homes, businesses, and the main, downtown branch of the public library. The library was filled with eight feet of water, which damaged the building and materials beyond repair. A group with a vision saw the silver lining and seized the opportunity to plan for a new library based on three main ideas.

Lawrence Public Library | New Landmark Libraries 2015 Winner


The Lawrence Public Library, KS, knows how to put a new twist on an old idea. Instead of tearing down or cobbling together an addition to its dark 1970s building, it encapsulated the entire existing structure inside a gleaming new one.

Bayview Linda Brooks-Burton Branch Library | New Landmark Libraries 2015 Winner


Reflecting the trend of flexible, mixed-use development shaping its own neighborhood, the Bayview Linda Brooks-Burton Branch of the San Francisco Public Library is a stunning example of how a library can honor a community’s history while laying out a path for its continued growth.