April 24, 2015

Careers

The Next Level: Library leadership starts here | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

Lead the Change, now entering its fourth year, has illustrated to us just how deep the need is for leadership development. A 2014 survey of 550-plus Movers & Shakers stressed the need for the entire staff to be up to speed on innovations in libraries and personal leadership.

Movers & Shakers 2015

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Passion. Vision. Mission. These are just a few of the words that characterize the 50 individuals—and one organization—named 2015 Movers & Shakers.

The Reveal: Announcing LJ’s 2015 Movers & Shakers

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Passion. Vision. Mission. These are just a few of the words that characterize the 50 individuals—and one organization—named 2015 Movers & Shakers. Chosen from more than 300 nominations, the Movers see the future and bring it to life.
This year’s Movers & Shakers are profiled in the March 15 issue of Library Journal, and those profiles will be posted in an online version, sponsored by OCLC and Boopsie, rolling out next week, one group at a time. However, so as not to prolong the suspense, the complete class of 2015 is listed below. Join us in congratulating them.

Barbara Stripling on Seeing the Big Picture

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Barbara Stripling has served as assistant professor of practice at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies since 2012, and was recently promoted to senior associate dean. Stripling also served as president of the American Library Association (ALA) from 2013–14, where she initiated a number of programs that reflected her commitment to library advocacy. These included the ALA Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion and the proactive public awareness initiative Libraries Change Lives, which culminated in the “Declaration for the Right to Libraries”—a statement testifying to the power and value of libraries that was signed by advocates nationwide.

Q&A with Paul Gazzolo, Gale Senior VP and General Manager

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Paul Gazzolo joined library resource vendor Gale, part of Cengage Learning, as senior vice president and general manager this November. He will be leading Gale’s strategy, product development, sales, and marketing teams, working closely with Gale’s partner libraries. Before moving to Gale, Gazzolo was general manager of research and learning at Wolters Kluwer CCH tax and accounting service. Prior to that position he served as president of World Book, where he successfully transitioned the well-known encyclopedia into a digital presence.

Benefiting from Your Benefits | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

Okay folks, it’s time to talk about one of those things they usually don’t cover in library school: job benefits. As any employer can tell you, the cost of your benefits is considerable (or at least, usually it is, if you have halfway decent benefits, and most libraries do provide at least that). Which means your employment provides you with stuff to which you may not pay a lot of attention…until you’re up against a problem and really need that safety net.

Payday | LJ Salary Survey 2014

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For many, salary discussion is the last taboo. But without knowing how their peers are compensated, it can be hard for librarians to make their case for better pay—and hard for library leaders to make the case to funders that higher salaries are necessary to attract and retain the best candidates. LJ has, for years, conducted its annual Placements & Salaries survey, which focuses on recent graduates, to dig into what beginning librarians earn in their first positions and what trends those salaries reveal. Now, with the help of more than 3,200 public, academic, school, special, government, and consortium librarians from all 50 states, LJ’s inaugural salary survey for U.S. ­librarians and paralibrarians takes a deeper look at the range of the field’s salary potential.

More Data | LJ Salary Survey 2014

More data from LJ’s inaugural salary survey

Payday | LJ Salary Survey 2014 | Data Tables

Data from LJ’s inaugural salary survey presented in tabular format

Organizations: See How They Run | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

So I was at the Information Desk in Widener not long ago, and business was uncharacteristically slow (the thing I like best about working the Information Desk is that it’s usually hoppingly busy, and the kinds of questions that come in range from, “Where’s the bathroom?” to “Can you help me locate this 16th-century manuscript that’s essential for my thesis?”) when my friend and colleague, Joshua Parker, stopped by to say hello. Our discussions always cover a host of topics, but a favorite is about kinds of organizational structures (if you read the post linked from Joshua’s name you’ll see that he is that rare bird, a library manager mensch). He had some noteworthy things to say and some useful resources to recommend for reading, which I’ve found interesting and which I’m going to pass on to you folks. They’re not your usual library organization or management titles, however.