April 15, 2014

Measuring the Value of Journals | Periodicals Price Survey 2014

PeriodicalsPriceSurvey2014_chart

Journal price data is important for budget management processes, but price alone is not the sole factor determining value. Some metrics, like Impact Factor, have become important in assessing value, and similar value metrics will only increase in importance in the future. The implementation of the Counter 4 during 2014 will expand the availability of usage data from journals, databases, ebooks, and multimedia to support better decision-making. Building upon COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) and working with the digital object identifier (DOI) and ORCID (open researcher and contributor ID) identifier, the PIRUS (Publisher and Institutional Repository Usage Statistics) Code of Practice is designed to provide usage data at the individual article level, consolidating usage across platforms.

Steps Down the Evolutionary Road | Periodicals Price Survey 2014

The birth of the World Wide Web 25 years ago was the big bang event that spurred more change in the serials and scholarly publishing world than seen in the century that preceded it. Since that time, we have rapidly evolved from the print world to that of e-journals, e-journal packages, and open access (OA). But in the serials ecosystem, as in nature, not all things evolve at the same rate, and the cumulative impact of subtle steps can bring about profound change over time. Despite some notable events, such as the purchase of Mendeley by Elsevier, the sale of Springer to BC Partners, and the launch of SCOAP 3, there was no major disruption in the serials world during 2013.

OSU Libraries Offer Open Access Etextbooks to Students

OSU Valley Library

Oregon State University (OSU) is helping faculty produce their own open access textbooks for courses. The university press, an arm of the OSU libraries, is starting work on a series of open source e-textbooks that officials hope will ease the rising textbook costs that are a consistent cause of student complaints. To make the etextbook program work, the library and press are partnering with OSU’s Ecampus program, which administers distance and online learning programs for the college.

Ebooks and the Demise of ILL | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

Today I want to talk about one of the greatest services academic libraries offer to scholars, one that is absolutely essential for any sort of advanced scholarship, and one that is facing the biggest obstacle of its 140-or-so-year-old existence. I’m talking about interlibrary loan (ILL) and the threat it faces from ebooks.

Navigating User-Generated Resources: A Q&A with Computer Scientist Brent Hecht

Brent Hecht

User-generated content (UGC)—which includes tweets, reviews, Facebook posts, and Wikipedia articles—now plays a key role in the average person’s Internet experience. UGC is also becoming an indispensable resource for helping researchers make sense of big data. In his Wednesday keynote address “The Mining and Application of Diverse Cultural Perspectives in User-Generated Content” at the Electronic Resources and Libraries (ER&L) conference in Austin this week, Brent Hecht, assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Minnesota, will discuss how “UGC reflects the cultural diversity of its contributors to a previously unidentified extent and that this diversity has important implications for Web users and existing UGC-based technologies.” Prior to the event, LJ spoke with Hecht about the intersection of geography and computer science, the influence of UGC, and why librarians are needed to help patrons navigate popular UGC resources such as Wikipedia.

Open Road Adds SF/Fantasy with E-Reads | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

In February, Open Road Integrated Media announced that it would acquire E-Reads, a pioneer ebook publisher founded in 1999 by literary agent Richard Curtis. The deal is scheduled to close April 1, and adds 1,200 titles to Open Road’s catalog of 4,200 digital books. “It fleshes out Open Road’s growing genre list, specifically science fiction and fantasy,” said company cofounder and CEO Jane Friedman, “with authors like Harlan Ellison, Greg Bear, John Norman, Dave Duncan, Dan Simmons, Brian Aldiss, and Robert Sheckley.” The company plans to make the books available to all channels, including libraries, shortly after the agreement takes effect.

Random’s First Look Book Club Up and Running | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

In an internal Random House memo, Jen Childs, director of Library Marketing, reported that the department’s latest initiative, First Look Book Club, took off to a roaring start in February, with 2,500 subscribers opting in. The club, a new book discovery tool, is an offshoot of Suzanne Beecher’s Dear Reader, which began offering five-minute chapter snippets in 2000. While many libraries subscribe to Dear Reader for a fee (it is free to library patrons), the First Look Book Club is free to all and goes direct to librarians, patrons, and “book lovers everywhere,” said Childs, with one Random House title featured each week.

U.K. Libraries Offer Free Article Access to Walk-Ins

ATR

Public libraries in the United Kingdom are set to play a role in expanding public access to academic research via the recently announced “Access to Research” plan. Thousands of research journal articles will be made available for free: but only on computers located physically within a public library, not remotely.

Court Strikes Down FCC’s Net Neutrality Mandate

In a ruling that could have serious implications for the way Internet access is regulated in the United States, the Washington, D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled this morning that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) does not have the authority to impose so-called ‘net neutrality’ rules on Internet service providers (ISPs).

Scientific Data Lost to Poor Archiving

Hundreds of new pieces of scientific research are published every month, in fields from physics to biology. While the studies themselves are assiduously archived by publishers, the underlying data researchers analyze to come to their published conclusions can be another story. A recent study in the journal Current Biology found that the data that forms the backbone of those studies becomes less and less accessible to researchers over the years. That lack of archiving, says University of British Columbia zoologist Tim Vines, represents a missed opportunity for the scientific community as a whole.