September 18, 2014

A World of Firsts | Genre Spotlight: New Adult

A World of Firsts | Genre Spotlight: New Adult

“New Adult” fiction embraces the college years through first jobs, first loves, and first going out on one’s own. Will it last, and what do librarians need to know?

One Book, Well Done

BIG DEAL Marketing drives city read participation. (top-bottom): Dearborn PL readers were “wild” about the kickoff for its 2014 Big Read; Kansas City PL chose True Grit in 2013; and Seattle PL branded its program with an iconic logo

Organizations in every state in America, plus the District of Columbia, have hosted a communitywide reading program at one point or another, according to the Library of Congress. So-called One Book programs are everywhere. However, to engage the entire community, whether municipality, county, region, or state, successfully in a community­wide reading event takes planning as well as skill and enthusiasm. LJ spoke with reads veterans from around the country to learn what worked for them—and what could work for your library.

What Are You Weighting For? | Collection Development: Diet Facts & Fads

What Are You Weighting For? | Collection Development: Diet Facts & Fads

Weight loss programs and products are big business. But who has the answers for those unsure of how to eat healthfully? These 35 resources offer up the skinny on staying in good shape while eating well.

Library Linguistics

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More and more, libraries strive not only to be spaces for researching subjects of interest to their patrons but to offer options that let users learn new skills, whether they’re physically in the library or not. One area in which mobile learning through the library is making headway is language learning. Many online lesson providers offer programs through libraries that patrons can use in the building, at home, or even while waiting in line for a cup of coffee.

Payday | LJ Salary Survey 2014

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For many, salary discussion is the last taboo. But without knowing how their peers are compensated, it can be hard for librarians to make their case for better pay—and hard for library leaders to make the case to funders that higher salaries are necessary to attract and retain the best candidates. LJ has, for years, conducted its annual Placements & Salaries survey, which focuses on recent graduates, to dig into what beginning librarians earn in their first positions and what trends those salaries reveal. Now, with the help of more than 3,200 public, academic, school, special, government, and consortium librarians from all 50 states, LJ’s inaugural salary survey for U.S. ­librarians and paralibrarians takes a deeper look at the range of the field’s salary potential.

Books for the Masses | Editors’ Picks BEA 2014

Books for the Masses | Editors’ Picks BEA 2014

LJ‘s review editors braved the crowds at BookExpo America to find this fall’s most intriguing and memorable reads.

2014 Gale/LJ Library of the Year: Edmonton Public Library, Transformed by Teamwork

A WINNING TEAM (top row, l.-r.): Edmonton Public Library Deputy CEO Pilar Martinez (l.) and CEO Linda Cook are proud 
of their approach to service and their team, which includes (l.–r.) director of marketing and fund development 
Tina Thomas, director of library services Linda Garvin, director of collections and technology Pam Ryan, director of library 
services Louise Reimer, and facilities director Kevin Kramer. Bottom row, l.-r.: EPL touts its free library card promotion, and Martinez 
and Cook stand behind EPL’s “Spread the Words” slogan with director of human resources services 
Mike Lewis (l.) and EPL CFO Gastone Monai (r.). Photos by Phil Chin/AP Images for Library Journal

For 101 years, Alberta’s Edmonton Public Library (EPL) has galvanized its ever-growing city. From its beginnings above a meat and liquor store in 1913 to its current configuration as a massive, team-driven enterprise, EPL has served as a pioneering gathering place, connecting people and expanding minds. In the process, it changed the parameters of what it means to be a public library and transformed itself. Having the spirit and creativity to do that meant taking risks, innovating, and embracing change. It made EPL a model for all public libraries and the winner of the 2014 Gale/Library Journal Library of the Year Award.

Future Proof | Library by Design

MEET US IN ST. LOUIS Top row, l.-r: St. Louis’s famed arch is a welcome sight, as is the renovated downtown St. Louis Public Library (SLPL) Central Library, which played host to the day’s activities. Middle row, l.-r.: LJ’s Kathleen Quinlan helped attendees check in. Posters highlighted the featured design challenges. Bottom row, l.-r: SLPL’s Central Library revamp was the subject of Library by Design’s Fall 2013 edition, which attracted interested attendees. SLPL executive director Waller McGuire in his opening remarks discussed the massive effort to make over the Central Library and expand its services. Photos by Kevin Henegan

On November 8, 2013, librarians and architects from around the country gathered at the newly renovated Central Branch of the St. Louis Public Library (SLPL) to discuss the present and future of building libraries at LJ’s Design Institute (DI). The watchword of the fall 2013 DI was flexibility, and the emphasis of the event was on creating libraries that can adapt to serve new purposes—some of which librarians and designers can’t even yet foresee.

…and the Kitchen Sink | Library by Design

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It’s not news to anyone who follows library design that the mission is expanding from one of providing room for reading and research to a more complex, community-driven model that serves as a hub for a much broader range of activities. Hospitality-influenced amenities already permeate newer libraries and renovations in the form of lounges, cafés, and multipurpose event spaces. Now, some (literally) cutting-edge libraries are taking it a step further, adding kitchens for demonstrations and patron use.

Betting on Vegas | ALA 2014 Preview

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Something different is in store for attendees of this year’s American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, to be held June 26–July 1 at Nevada’s Las Vegas Convention Center. For ALA annual and Midwinter Meeting veterans, accustomed to a rotation of familiar venues, Las Vegas offers a new twist. This is only the second ALA get-together held in Las Vegas; the first was in 1973. It remains to be seen whether the famous tourist destination will attract attendees in the numbers that habitually turn out for centrally located Chicago—and whether those who do turn up will forsake the exhibit floor for the town’s famous shows and casinos.