March 22, 2017

Library Services

New Library Chapter of Awesome Foundation Accepting Grant Applications

awesomefoundation

The Innovation in Libraries chapter of The Awesome Foundation is currently accepting grant applications, with an April 15 deadline. Formed in 2009, The Awesome Foundation “is a global community advancing the interest of awesome in the universe, $1,000 at a time.” Autonomous chapters operate on a local level by raising funds from community trustees that are then given as microloans to projects in the arts, technology, community development, or other sectors, deemed “awesome” according to that chapter’s own guidelines.

Harvard Business Alumni Offer SFPL Pro Bono Consulting

HBS_logo

While many public libraries could benefit from business counsel from a team of experts, professional consulting services are not always in the budget, even for larger systems. But recently San Francisco Public Library (SFPL) had the opportunity to do just that, after it was selected to receive pro bono consultation from a team of Harvard Business School alumni.

Peer Navigators Bring “Lived Experience” to DPL Social Work Team

web_peernavigators

Across the country, more and more library systems are embracing their role as de facto matchmakers between social services and the people who need to access them by hiring social workers as staff. Sometimes, though, people who need to interact with these organizations don’t want to find out about them from traditional social workers, but from people who have dealt with them as users. That’s where the Denver Public Library (DPL) Peer Navigators come in.

Paralibrarian of the Year 2016: Patricia Pacheco

Photo ©James Kegley, www.jameskegley.com

Just two years after she immigrated to the United States from the Dominican Republic, Patricia ­Pacheco landed a library assistant position as the first bi­lingual staff member at the Sterling Branch of the Loudoun County Public Library system in Virginia. She had been a kindergarten teacher for nearly 20 years and had dealt with children of all ages in her home country. Early on in her time in the States, she volunteered part time in the Ashburn Library of Loudoun County. So when the Sterling branch announced that it sought a bilingual staff member, Pacheco applied and was hired. That was back in May 2015.

Librarians Mobilize Resources, Information, and Solidarity in Response to New Administration

Image by Rebecca McCorkindale

The results of the 2016 presidential election caught many by surprise. With the election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States, and his immediate remaking of American policy through executive orders, public and academic librarians began to mobilize. From book displays addressing resistance and inclusivity, to graphics proclaiming that all are welcome in the library, to topical LibGuides, to online groups organized by discipline or principles, library staff and supporters across the country joined forces with like thinkers to do what they do best: share information where it’s most needed.

Prisons & Publics | Outreach

ljx170202webWitteveen1

Many public librarians serving local jails and prisons note an increase in positive behaviors tied to inmates obtaining library services while inside and a desire to seek library services for themselves and their families upon release.

Easy Pass | Product Spotlight

ljx170201webhazlettDiscover_Go

Many libraries work with local cultural institutions to provide patrons with free or reduced-cost access. These print passes can be checked out in-house by patrons just like other resources, complete with circulation limits, due dates, and fines. Some software companies are simplifying pass management with web-based tools to help patrons discover and check out museum passes and event tickets or make reservations.

From Pilot to Permanent | Innovation

LEADIN HERE Photos talking about Meridian Library District’s unBound tech branch. Top shows the exterior--a former bank. Don’t have IDs for everyone here, but you can say something about virtual reality stations (top l.); Digital Services Assistant Matthew Blackburn (l.) and Tech Library supervisor Nick Grove monitor progress on a 3-D printer; patrons making use of a recording booth built into the former safe, and patrons exercising their minds with creative play--or whatever you want to say. Photos ©2016 Macey Snelson, MLD

One of the most effective ways to test and evaluate a new program or service is to conduct a pilot project, but how do you scale up from there? How do you translate the small successes into sustainable, permanent additions to your library?

SPONSORED CONTENT

Rethinking the What and How of the ILS

library services

by Tania Fersenheim, Content & Applications Manager at Fenway Libraries Online Are we spending money wisely? Librarians and administrators ask themselves this question in many ways, both big and small, every day. Sometimes it keeps us up at night. It’s inherent in the choices we make between different brands of dry erase marker, different resources […]

Saskatoon Library Launches Read for Reconciliation Space

Hide Cutting at opening of SPL's Reconciliation Reading Area (l-r):
Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark, Office of the Treaty Commissioner, Executive Director Harry Lafond, Kelly Bitternose (survivor), Eugene Arcand, SPL Board Chair Candice Grant, Elder Walter Linklater, Elder Maria Linklater and Carol Cooley CEO and Director of Libraries for Saskatoon Public Library.
Photo credit: Eagle Feather News

Since the last of Canada’s Indian residential schools closed in 1996, the nation has been attempting to shape a response to the legacy of abuse that the residential school system—which removed native children from their homes and families—inflicted on its Indigenous Peoples. Saskatoon Public Library (SPL), Saskatchewan, has become the first public library to incorporate a space permanently dedicated to truth and reconciliation. On November 21 SPL’s Frances Morrison Central Library opened the Read for Reconciliation reading area, which includes a full set of the reports compiled by the TRC over five years, plus a variety of books about Canada’s history of residential schools, as well as an extensive reading list on the history and legacy of residential schools in Canada on its homepage.