July 30, 2015

Tests Are Changing: How to Keep Your Collections Up to Date

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Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Join us as Rosanne Cordell, Lauren Barack, and Barron’s publisher, Bob O’Sullivan, share insights and tips on ensuring your test-prep collections are up-to-date.
Register Now!

K|N’s Open Access Network: Knowledge Made Public

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The Open Access Network (OAN), a project set to establish a business model for OA in the humanities and social sciences, was the topic of a key session at “Knowledge Made Public,” a May 5 conference held at the City University of New York (CUNY) Academic Commons. The session featured a presentation by K|N Consultants principals Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg, who were joined by Martin Burke and Jessie Daniels of the CUNY Graduate Center, and Ken Wissoker, editorial director at Duke University Press, for a lively and informative discussion of OAN, K|N’s newest initiative, which will launch in mid-May.

Author! Author! | Programming

GRAND PRIZE Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award winner Ann Patchett (signing) at Tulsa City-County Library. Photo by John Fancher

Public libraries are all about access: to services, to data, to books. Offering patrons access to some of their favorite authors is a bonus but an important one. Author events strengthen the existing bonds between readers and books: seeing an author read from his or her work and having the chance to ask questions—or just hear the answers—offers a new dimension of engagement. But these events also reinforce the idea of the library as a point of entry into people’s reading lives, beyond simple readers’ advisory. The landscape of author events is continually changing. As programming budgets shrink and authors’ publicity tours get smaller, even libraries with successful track records need to be increasingly nimble and imaginative. While the choice depends on a library’s resources, location, and patron demographics, there are a few best practices that can help librarians develop exciting and well-attended programs.

Baltimore’s Enoch Pratt Free Library Provides Haven in Troubled Times

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When Enoch Pratt presented the city of Baltimore with more than $1 million to establish a library system in 1882, he declared, “My library shall be for all, rich and poor without distinction of race or color, who, when properly accredited, can take out the books if they will handle them carefully and return them.” More than 130 years later, during the tumultuous days at the end of April, staff and administration of the Enoch Pratt Free Library (EPFL) kept alive that spirit by staying open despite community unrest.

President Obama Announces New Library Initiatives

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At a visit to Washington, DC’s Anacostia Neighborhood Library April 30, President Barack Obama announced two new initiatives that promise to rally America’s libraries, publishers, and nonprofit organizations to strengthen learning opportunities for all children, particularly in low-income communities. The plan, dubbed the ConnectED Library Challenge, will engage civic leaders, libraries, and schools to work together to ensure that all school students receive public library cards. Commitments from 30 library systems are already in place.

Connecticut and Vermont Libraries Await Decisions on Budget Cuts

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CT-VTlogoOther than the proximity of the two New England states, the library systems of Connecticut and Vermont don’t have much in common. They don’t share similar funding arrangements or infrastructure. But both states are facing potential budget reductions that could significantly impact their public libraries, and both have called on residents and legislators alike to speak up for their library services.

Rebecca Stavick, Omaha’s First Digital Librarian

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In February 2015, Rebecca Stavick was appointed executive director of Omaha’s first digital library, the newly-named Do Space, scheduled to launch in November. The new role is a logical bridge between Stavick’s previous five years as staff development specialist at Omaha Public Library (OPL) and her work as cofounder of Open Nebraska, which she describes as “a citizen-led civic hacking organization dedicated to solving community problems through civic application development, open data advocacy, and tech education.”

Michelle Jeske: Looking Toward the Future with DPL

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On March 2, Michelle Jeske stepped into her new role as Denver Public Library (DPL) city librarian. Physically, she did not have far to go: Jeske had already been working at DPL since 2001, most recently as the director of collections, technology, and innovation on the library’s executive team. Previously Jeske—a 2005 LJ Mover & Shaker—served as manager of DPL’s web information services and its community technology center. But while her new job will not involve any major changes of scenery, moving into the position vacated by Shirley Amore—who retired after serving as city librarian for nearly nine years—promises to give Jeske a panoramic view of Denver’s thriving and robust public library system, and the opportunity to bring about some exciting changes to the landscape.

Expanded Hours Approved for San José Public Library

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All 23 San José Public Library (SJPL), CA, branches will stay open an additional two days per week starting July 1 under a city budget plan stewarded by Mayor Sam Liccardo, whose political support is helping to fast-track a long-awaited realization of the library system’s top priority.

Public Libraries and Hispanics Pew Report Shows Library Gap Between U.S.-Born and Immigrants

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The Pew Research Center’s latest report taken from its 2013 Library Services Survey focuses on Public Libraries and Hispanics, examining usage patterns and attitudes among the United States Hispanic population age 16 and older. While the findings identify some differences between Latinos and their White [non-Hispanic] and African American counterparts, the greatest discrepancies lie between native-born Hispanics—those born within the 50 states or Puerto Rico—and immigrants.