October 31, 2014

LJ in Print

Reservation Management | Product Spotlight

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Print management and computer reservation solutions are designed to help libraries cut down on waste and ensure that time on public computers is distributed fairly among patrons, with minimal staff intervention. To keep pace with current trends, several vendors have added new features to their public computer management packages in recent months, enabling patrons to print from their own mobile devices, for example. All vendors negotiate pricing on a system- by-system basis, typically according to the selection of specific options or modules, the number of branches in which the solutions will be used, and the number of public access stations at each branch. Some solutions, such as Librarica’s CASSIE and Comprise’s SAM, are designed as fully integrated systems offering a variety of management features in one package. Other providers, such as EnvisionWare, iTeam, and GoPrint, offer the option to purchase reservation and print management modules separately. However, all vendors contacted for this spotlight describe their solutions as scalable, with options available for networks with as few as five public computers.

The Library of the Century | Design4Impact

HIGH TECH Computer training lab (l.) and children’s Promethean ActivTable (r.) at Pikes Peak

Library 21c, the Pikes Peak Library District’s (PPLD) latest addition, is a centralized education and experimentation hub. The new two-story Colorado Springs library is the biggest building in the district, the second-largest in Colorado, supporting about 620,000 residents. Last year, the district had 3.6 million ­visitors. What makes this new library unique is the wide variety of opportunities under the same roof.

Permission to Publish, In Defense of Convenience, and more Feedback

Letting go of permission requirements for use of special collections; why convenience isn’t a death knell for libraries; why library schools should teach advocacy, and more Letters to LJ’s October 15, 2014 issue

Coffee To Head RAILS, Pack To Direct Alabama Public Library Service, and More Library People News

Bill Coffee was elected Board President of the Reaching Across Illinois Library System (RAILS); Doug Crane was promoted to Director of the Palm Beach County Library System, FL; Nancy Pack was appointed Director of the Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the October 15 issue of Library Journal.

Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year.

Always Doesn’t Live Here Anymore | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Some of the most creative and flexible librarians I know have been working for more than a few years in libraries. Some of the most inspiring and influential professionals in our field have had distinguished careers and still continue to make a mark on our governance and future. I was lucky to learn about collection development, reference service, and weeding during my public library days from professionals who had worked in the system for multiple decades. These are the same folks who did not shy away from the Internet and its affordances in the mid 1990s.

View from the Top: Susan Hildreth’s insight on collective impact | Editorial

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When President Barack Obama appointed Susan H. Hildreth as director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in 2011, many in the profession knew we were in for a robust four years of activity by that federal agency. Hildreth had already been influencing the library landscape for years in major leadership roles, including time heading major public libraries (San Francisco and Seattle) and the California State Library.

Collective Impact | Q&A with Susan H. Hildreth

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Susan H. Hildreth was appointed director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) by President Barack Obama on January 19, 2011. Her nomination had been confirmed by the U.S. Senate by unanimous consent on December 22, 2010. Prior to joining IMLS, Hildreth served as Seattle city librarian, California state librarian, and San Francisco city librarian, as well as president of the Public Library Association in 2006. Under her leadership, IMLS made $857,241,000 in total grants to libraries and museums. As Hildreth’s four-year term draws to a close, she shares with LJ some of what she learned at the head of the institute and what she hopes the library community will build on in the future.

Placements & Salaries 2014: Renaissance Librarians

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“Luck, patience, and positive attitude” were the keywords for members of the 2013 graduating class. Once again graduates reported both positive experiences and challenges in the search for employment inside and outside of the library and information science field. The overall average starting salary improved 2.6%, moving above $45,000 for the first time, to $45,650. Other pointers toward an improving job market were revealed in a decline in the rate of unemployment, dropping to 4.3% of those reporting employment status, and an increase in the rate of permanent professional positions, 69.6% of the job placements in 2013, up from 61.2% in 2012. The length of the job search appeared slightly shortened with an average search of 4.2 months, ranging from 3.6 months in the Southwest to 4.7 months in the Southeast.

Placements & Salaries 2014: Survey Methods

We received responses either through the institutional survey or individuals representing 40 of the 49 LIS schools surveyed in the United States and from 2,023 of the reported LIS graduates. Response rates varied among the programs, ranging from less than 1% of reported graduates to 83%. Approximately 44.3% of graduates from the participating LIS programs responded to the survey.