November 19, 2014

LJ in Print

It’s About Time | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

“I Don’t Have The Time.” Have you said this in a meeting or a discussion with a colleague? Has this rolled off the tongue when confronted with an unexpected change, a new technology, or another initiative? Many of us are stretched to our limits. I applaud the folks I meet who have absorbed more and more duties as staffing patterns have changed. However, I bristle when I hear the “no time” response, because sometimes I think it’s an excuse.

Money Still Talks!: ALA’s endowment must support its values | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

A few weeks ago several events converged to drive home to me the realization that problems of climate change, global warming, carbon emissions, and a fouled environment, already urgent and dangerous, were accelerating so fast that it’s already too late to correct them.

Focus on Relevance: Tell politicians why libraries are vital | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

Not long after Republican Kim Wyman was elected secretary of state of Washington in 2012, she had a meeting with a legislator that set her on a new course. As they began to explore the possibility of rebooting an envisioned but later abandoned Heritage Center project, she was asked, “Are libraries necessary?” It’s a great question. Her response should be a prod to all of us to get out there and make sure our elected officials have the insight into libraries they need to help build and sustain strong funding.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Asa Kachan appointed Chief Librarian and CEO at Halifax Public Libraries; Mary Sauer-Games named Vice President of Product Management at OCLC; and more People news from the November 1, 2014 issue of Library Journal.

Apples v. Oranges, Why Citations are Needed, and more Feedback

Why sports versus libraries and self versus traditional publishing are not simple comparison, the point of precision in citation, and more Letters to LJ’s November 1, 2014 Issue

NaNoWriMo at Your Library | Programs That Pop

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One popular program at the Corvallis–Benton County Public Library (C-BCPL) last year was our National Novel Writing Month (­NaNoWriMo) series of events, which offered a fun and creative challenge for community members: to write a novel in 30 days. The program was so popular that the library published a collection of writings from many of the participants.

Developing a Service Philosophy | The User Experience

Aaron Schmidt

It takes hard work to create a library that provides good user experience. As convenient as it would be, building an exemplary organization doesn’t happen by waving a wand. Instead, libraries must optimize all of their touch points, develop sane policies, design relevant services, and empower staff to provide members with top-notch ­function.

1,000 Words | Insights and Outcomes

GET GRAPHIC: Ad/lib's clean look practices what it preaches

We’re all familiar with the old saying that a picture is worth 1,000 words. But when it comes to communication with our patrons, whether existing or potential, many in libraryland are more comfortable crafting the 1,000 words than the graphics to sit alongside—or replace—them.

Blue-Ribbon Libraries | Library by Design

Top row: Midland Centennial Library, TX; Central Library, Bottom row, l.-r.: St. Louis Public Library, Glenmore Christian Academy Elemantray Library, Calgary Alta. Midland photo by Maxwell Filmworks; St. Louis photo  ©Timothy Hursley; Glenmore photo by Dawn Stringer, On A Wire Photography & Design

The Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA) , a division of the American Library Association (ALA), and the International Interior Design Association (IIDA) honored the winners of the 2014 Library Interior Design Awards at ALA’s annual conference held in Las Vegas in June. Over 200 entries were reviewed, and many of this year’s 19 winners have a vibrant and functional design that takes into consideration that libraries are more than ever a gathering space for their community.

United We Stand: Reflecting on the Aspen report | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

There is much to think about in “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries,” the first and much anticipated report of the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries (AIDPL), released last month at the New York Public Library (ow.ly/CSN7z). While just a start in practical terms, it begins to reframe the role and position of public libraries in light of the possibilities brought by the digital age. Importantly, it describes a more robust, interconnected network of vital institutions, geared to impact the lives of even more people in the communities they serve. As a framing device, a sort of charter on what libraries are today and could become, it is inspiring, challenging, and useful.