May 22, 2015

LJ in Print

Serving Two Masters | Library by Design, Spring 2015

A NATURAL PARTNERSHIP The Tidewater Community College/City of Virginia Beach Joint-Use Library balances unique design against the retention ponds created to absorb rainwater. Photo ©Jeff Goldberg/Esto

Joint-use libraries, especially partnerships between public libraries and colleges, are rare but not unheard of. In an era of belt-tightening, pooling resources with a partner that shares many of your institution’s goals can be a tempting proposition for schools and cities alike. It’s complex, but as seen at the Tidewater Community College/City of ­Virginia Beach Joint-Use Library, opened in 2013, it can also be extremely rewarding.

Design Institute Boston Design Challenges | Library by Design, Spring 2015

ljx150502LBDwebDIchallenge4

Design challenges from the Gloucester Lyceum and Sawyer Free Library, the Kingston Public Library, The Newburgh Free Library, The Springfield City Library, and Towson University.

Design for People | Library by Design Spring 2015

1. The Main Library’s Guastavino Room was an impressive backdrop to registration
and lunch. 2. Attendees tossed around ideas during the Gloucester Lyceum/Sawyer
Free Library’s challenge session. 3. The Open Forum allowed for suggestions from
participating architects (l.–r.) Aimee G. Lombardo (LLB Architects), Peter Gisolfi
(Gisolfi Associates), Peter Bolek (HBM Architects), and Matthew Oudens (Oudens Ello
Architecture). 4. The challenge session for Maryland’s Towson University brought
about solid strategies. 5. The session on creative and inspirational spaces featured
experts (l.–r.) Conrad Ello (Oudens Ello Architecture), Michael Colford (director of
library services at Boston PL), moderator Emily Puckett Rodgers (School of Information,
University of Michigan), and Jeff Hoover (Tappé Architects). Photos by Kevin Henegan

Before Boston saw its first snowstorm of what would prove to be a very long winter, an enthusiastic group of architects, designers, vendors, and librarians convened at Boston Public Library’s (BPL) Central Library in Copley Square for LJ’s December 2014 Design Institute (DI). The first question of the event, posed by Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners library building consultant Lauren Stara, set the stage: “The shift to digital and changing user expectations means that even buildings only ten or 20 years old may already be out-of-date…. How do we build for an ever-changing ­environment?”

Printing with Purpose | Field Reports

ljx150501webfieldReport1

It was back in April 2014 that we first met. The Makerbot Replicator and I, that is. I work at the Half Hollow Hills Community Library (HHHCL) in Dix Hills, NY, and we are part of the Suffolk County Library System, located on the eastern half of Long Island. Our library system has a bit of a reputation for being smart and ahead of the curve with technology, and when HHHCL heard of its out-of-the-box idea of circulating a 3-D printer among member libraries, we couldn’t wait to sign up. Our turn came last April.

Branching Out

Connecticut College completed $10 million library reno five months ahead of schedule; The Norfolk Public Library, NE, gained voter approval for a tax increase to fund its expansion, and more library construction and renovation news from the May 1, 2015, issue of Library Journal

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Alcantara-Antoine appointed Public Services Manager at Virginia Beach Public Library, Huprich named Director of Continuing Education at Georgia Public Library Service, Walden appointed Associate Dean of Learning Resources at East Tennessee State University’s Quillen College of Medicine Library, and more people new from the May 1, 2015, issue of Library Journal.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, May 1, 2015 Issue

Reforming LIS, revisiting the revamped Dothan Houston County Library System, and remembering Cathie Linz in letters to the editor from May 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal

They Taught Us To Listen: Lessons from new generations of librarians | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

Recently I ENJOYED a long-postponed lunch with two of my closest and most beloved colleagues from these past few decades. My connection with Nora Rawlinson, now running the incredibly useful selection and acquisitions website EarlyWord, began in arguments over whether libraries, through their book and materials acquisitions, should “give ’em what they want”—that is, buy for popular demand—or “give ’em what they need” by trying to select and acquire those items that qualify as classics, or essential information sources. Nora and I also disputed centralized vs. distributed book selection. Seeing Nora again reminded me that debates over library book and materials selection have been with us since the beginnings of the public library movement.

BEA’s Big Reveal | BEA Preview 2015

ljx150501webBEA1

In a departure with tradition, this year’s BookExpo America (BEA) runs from midday Wednesday through Friday, May 27–29, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center (JCC), rather than Thursday through Saturday. While you’re marking your calendar, also take note of the events listed below, which offer exciting opportunities to get an insider view of some top authors and their writing processes. Libraries and their purchasing dollars are also getting welcome attention, with several programs taking the lid off what publishers are doing to win them over. Of course, there will be new books galore, too. See you on the floor!

Small Libraries, Big Impact | Award Retrospective, 2005-2015

collage of Best Small Library in America LJ covers

The Best Small Library in America award was created in 2005 to honor libraries that meet the challenges of smaller budgets, space, technology, and collections and still find ways to bring expanded, innovative, and supportive services to their smaller communities. Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, for the past decade the award has encouraged and showcased exemplary work in libraries serving populations under 25,000. Judging criteria include creativity in developing model services and programs, innovations in public access computing, demonstrated community support, and evidence of the library’s role as community center. This year LJ looks back to see how the award has influenced the winning libraries, their communities, and their futures.