October 7, 2015

LJ in Print

Altmetrics Ambassadors | Academic Libraries


“Altmetrics: A manifesto,” published five years ago this month, described an academic publishing landscape in which the volume of literature was exploding, and the three traditional filters used to help researchers gauge the relative importance of individual papers in their fields—peer review, citation counting, and a journal’s average citations per article—were failing to keep up. Scholars were moving their work onto the web, and alternative, article-level metrics drawn from online reference managers Zotero and Mendeley, scholarly social bookmarking services such as CiteULike, or even page-views of blogs and “likes” or comments on mainstream social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter could be used to track the impact of new research in real time, wrote ­Impactstory ­cofounder Jason Priem; Wikimedia Foundation head of research Dario ­Taraborelli; Paul Groth, then-researcher VU University Amsterdam; and Cameron Neylon, then–senior scientist at the Science and Technology Facilities Council. Could these new metrics be just as relevant as peer review and citations when judging the impact and influence of new research?

Librarians’ Picks | Library by Design, Fall 2015


Recently completed building projects offer refreshing and unexpected design solutions to serve patrons.

Real-World Barriers: Expanding on a Tradition of Access | Editorial


Libraries are all about access to information in its many forms, and librarians have a long and admirable tradition of striving to increase that access whenever they can. Several recent events have spurred me to think about real-world barriers—visible and invisible—and how seeing them in light of access to the library could influence services.

Feedback: Letters to LJ | September 15, 2015 Issue

Library embraces entrepreneurship; more graphic novels, not fewer; community outreach; and more letters to the editor from the September 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Charleston Connections | Charleston Conference Preview 2015

Photos courtesy of Charleston Convention & Visitors Bureau

The theme of this year’s Charleston Conference, SC, November 4–7, is “Where Do We Go from Here”—and, really, isn’t that the perfect articulation of the underlying theme of every library conference? But as LJ’s John Berry said in last year’s Charleston preview (“Uniquely Hospitable,” LJ 10/1/15, p. 38ff.), no matter what changes each year brings, the under­lying focus of Charleston remains “Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition” for academic and research librarians. As Big Deals shrink and journal prices rise, ljx151001webCharleston2acquisition models proliferate, and monographs join articles in the open access funding fray, there is no shortage of such concerns for attendees to sink their teeth into, in and around enjoying the famous foodie offerings of the host city.

UpClose: Rooted in Nature | Library by Design, Fall 2015



The Vestavia Hills Library in the Forest opened in 2010 as Alabama’s first LEED Gold–certified library. The library takes its forest namesake very seriously: fewer than 25 percent of the trees on the site were disturbed in the building’s construction, and no tree more than 40 feet from the building was cut down. Of those that were removed, more than 80 percent were reincorporated into the library itself. The ceilings are made of pine; the entry hall is poplar; the service desks, fireplace exterior cladding, and doors to the community room are made of oak.

News Briefs | September 15, 2015

A $300,000 gift from an anonymous donor to the Bozeman Public Library, MT, will help fund a new bookmobile, The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Library launched the Historical Dietary Guidance Digital Collection, and more news in brief from the September 15, 2015.

Library People News | September 15, 2015

Stephen P. Weiter was appointed Dean of University Libraries at Oakland University, George Needham was appointed Director of Delaware County District Library, and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the September 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

UpClose: Alachua Library Keeps Its Cool | Library by Design, Fall 2015


In hot climates, air conditioning is a necessity to keep libraries livable for patrons and staff, especially during the summer. Climate warming is only exacerbating that situation. Unfortunately, air conditioning in turn accelerates climate warming. Now, innovative alternative cooling systems are looking to reduce that environmental impact, and the Alachua County Library District (ACLD), Gainesville, FL, is leading by example.

The Amazing Library Titles Race | Programs That Pop

Felicia Smith

“The Ass Is Dead! LONG LIVE the Ass!” Do I have your attention?

Good. That is the point of a library instruction workshop game that requires students to unscramble a book title, then search the catalog to find the item’s location and retrieve it from the shelves.