October 24, 2014

LJ in Print

Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year.

Always Doesn’t Live Here Anymore | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Some of the most creative and flexible librarians I know have been working for more than a few years in libraries. Some of the most inspiring and influential professionals in our field have had distinguished careers and still continue to make a mark on our governance and future. I was lucky to learn about collection development, reference service, and weeding during my public library days from professionals who had worked in the system for multiple decades. These are the same folks who did not shy away from the Internet and its affordances in the mid 1990s.

View from the Top: Susan Hildreth’s insight on collective impact | Editorial

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When President Barack Obama appointed Susan H. Hildreth as director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in 2011, many in the profession knew we were in for a robust four years of activity by that federal agency. Hildreth had already been influencing the library landscape for years in major leadership roles, including time heading major public libraries (San Francisco and Seattle) and the California State Library.

Collective Impact | Q&A with Susan H. Hildreth

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Susan H. Hildreth was appointed director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) by President Barack Obama on January 19, 2011. Her nomination had been confirmed by the U.S. Senate by unanimous consent on December 22, 2010. Prior to joining IMLS, Hildreth served as Seattle city librarian, California state librarian, and San Francisco city librarian, as well as president of the Public Library Association in 2006. Under her leadership, IMLS made $857,241,000 in total grants to libraries and museums. As Hildreth’s four-year term draws to a close, she shares with LJ some of what she learned at the head of the institute and what she hopes the library community will build on in the future.

Placements & Salaries 2014: Renaissance Librarians

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“Luck, patience, and positive attitude” were the keywords for members of the 2013 graduating class. Once again graduates reported both positive experiences and challenges in the search for employment inside and outside of the library and information science field. The overall average starting salary improved 2.6%, moving above $45,000 for the first time, to $45,650. Other pointers toward an improving job market were revealed in a decline in the rate of unemployment, dropping to 4.3% of those reporting employment status, and an increase in the rate of permanent professional positions, 69.6% of the job placements in 2013, up from 61.2% in 2012. The length of the job search appeared slightly shortened with an average search of 4.2 months, ranging from 3.6 months in the Southwest to 4.7 months in the Southeast.

Placements & Salaries 2014: Survey Methods

We received responses either through the institutional survey or individuals representing 40 of the 49 LIS schools surveyed in the United States and from 2,023 of the reported LIS graduates. Response rates varied among the programs, ranging from less than 1% of reported graduates to 83%. Approximately 44.3% of graduates from the participating LIS programs responded to the survey.

A Local Library | Library by Design

TRADITION UPDATED The Gullah Geechee heritage collection (above) is encircled by woven wood. The columns outside the entryway (r.) evoke the island’s oak trees. The library’s design (inset) combines modern technology with natural materials

To walk into the St. Helena Public Library, SC, is to become immersed in contradiction. On the one hand, it’s modern—a 21st-century library guided by a Maker space philosophy, complete with 3-D printers, an animator, recording studio, littleBits and Makey Makey kits, and more state-of-the-art technology. Seamlessly coexisting with this sleek newness is a down-home Southern warmth and natural, earthy simplicity, with architectural details that embrace links to a unique culture with connections to West Africa.

Placements & Salaries 2014: Make Sure Your School Gets Counted

DEANS, DIRECTORS, AND CHAIRS: If you are a faculty member or a director and your school did not respond fully, now is the time to get started on the next survey. GRADUATES: If you are a 2014 graduate, make sure that your institution has your current email and mailing addresses. Ask to be included in the LJ Placements & Salaries Survey of 2014 graduates. If your institution has chosen not to participate you can still do so by contacting the author.

Placements & Salaries 2014: Public, Academic, and Special Libraries

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Public libraries continue to see positive growth and opportunity. In 2013, nearly 24% of the reported placements were in public libraries, up from 18.7% in 2012. In 2013, approximately 9.8% of grads who sought employment in academic institutions accepted positions in departments outside of the library. In addition, 23.6% of this year’s new professionals were hired as academic librarians, up from 21.2% in 2012. Placements at special libraries (4.0%), government libraries (1.9%), and LIS vendors (1.4%) held steady in 2013.

Placements & Salaries 2014: More to the Story

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Salary gains and losses only tell a portion of the placement story for the graduating class. Of the 2,023 graduates responding to this year’s survey, approximately 81.4% said they were employed. This was down slightly from the 2012 class, however, 66.9% of those employed were in a permanent, professional position, up from the previous year’s report. Reports of jobs defined as temporary or contract positions declined. Graduates accepting positions outside of LIS increased.