May 25, 2015

Author! Author! | Programming

GRAND PRIZE Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award winner Ann Patchett (signing) at Tulsa City-County Library. Photo by John Fancher

Public libraries are all about access: to services, to data, to books. Offering patrons access to some of their favorite authors is a bonus but an important one. Author events strengthen the existing bonds between readers and books: seeing an author read from his or her work and having the chance to ask questions—or just hear the answers—offers a new dimension of engagement. But these events also reinforce the idea of the library as a point of entry into people’s reading lives, beyond simple readers’ advisory. The landscape of author events is continually changing. As programming budgets shrink and authors’ publicity tours get smaller, even libraries with successful track records need to be increasingly nimble and imaginative. While the choice depends on a library’s resources, location, and patron demographics, there are a few best practices that can help librarians develop exciting and well-attended programs.

Less is Less | The User Experience

ljx150501webSchmidt

Spring is HERE! Let’s celebrate this season of rebirth and renewal by thinking about making some changes in the library. Every library is burdened with a sacred cow or two. Some have an entire farm full! Laws of entropy dictate that once a library program or service starts, there’s a fair chance it will continue, even if it becomes clear at some point that it is no longer serving the purpose it once did. Sacred cows and other ineffective programs use up the valuable resource of staff time. The cost of feeding and maintaining sacred cows oftentimes doesn’t return much benefit to the ­library.

Engage the Electorate: Ramping up for 2016 | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

The 2016 presidential primary activity and election may provide libraries with an unmatched opportunity to show their stuff. As candidates officially jump into the race, voters are already inundated by an unprecedented volume of information and perspectives—not to mention the onslaught of misinformation and distractions. As the pace heats up, potential voters will need help engaging in the process, and voters will need more help than ever sorting out the facts on the real issues and learning what they need to make their own decisions.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, April 15, 2015 Issue

A people-powered selection of letters to the editor, celebrating a wide swath of 2015 Movers & Shakers and mourning Cathie Linz, a writer and librarian, from the April 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal

News Briefs for April 15, 2015

Copyright Clearance Center integrated its Get It Now academic solution with OCLC’s WorldShare Interlibrary Loan service, three Virgin Islands libraries were given almost $1 million in grant funding under the Office of Insular Affairs’ Capital Improvement Project Program, and more news in brief from the April 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Geoffrey Dickinson to head Worcester Public Library, Lorraine Estelle to direct COUNTER, and more people news from the April 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On | Periodicals Price Survey 2015

ljx150402_periodicals

Like the ground in the Ring of Fire that surrounds the Pacific Ocean, the serials world is in almost constant motion, responding simultaneously to pressures both large and small. As in seismology, some of the pressures result in incremental changes, while others, often the result of years of incremental change hidden below the surface, seem suddenly to shake the serials world like an earthquake.

Automated Materials Handling | Product Spotlight

ljx150402webenisBibliothecaAMH

Automated materials handling (AMH) refers to any automation that reduces or eliminates the need for staff or patrons to check in, check out, or sort material, or to move bins containing library materials. Those jobs are handled by checkin machines, sorters, conveyors, singulators, stackers, and unstackers, speeding up processes throughout busy branches and central libraries.

Room to Grow | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

A FEW YEARS AGO at the American Library Association’s (ALA) annual conference in Anaheim, CA, I had dinner with librarians from three large universities. The conversation turned to something they had in common: they were all moving print book collections at their respective institutions off-site to make room for student spaces. Back then, this was a big deal, and these administrators met with opposition and angst from their constituents.

Living Libraries: Green that gives back | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

We talk a lot about resilience when we discuss library sustainability. It is one of the trends identified by Miguel Figueroa, an LJ 2005 Mover & Shaker, in the recent “Forecasting the Future of Libraries” report. It encompasses a broad swath of library work—dynamic programming, deep and robust community commitment to the well-being of the institution, and facility design that can withstand the very real threats of extreme weather change that comes with global warming. Resilience also means creating buildings that don’t drain precious natural resources.