July 4, 2015

Stacking the Deck | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Have you read about the “Full-Stack Employee?” In a think piece published in Medium, author Chris Messina—the creator of the hashtag, no less—offers this definition: “the full-stack employee has a powerful combination of skills that make them incredibly valuable. They are adept at navigating the rapidly evolving and shifting technological landscape. They make intuitive decisions amidst information-abundance, where sparse facts mingle loosely with data-drenched opinions.” It’s a tech-heavy take, but bear with me, as Messina broadens the definition: “Full-stack employees have an insatiable appetite for new ideas, best practices, and ways to be more productive and happy. They’re curious about the world, what makes it work, and how to make their mark on it.”

Mitchell Davis on Community Engagement from Saying Yes to Self-Pub to Comic Cons

mitchell davis

The first SELF-e collection of self-published titles chosen by LJ and hosted by BiblioLab’s BiblioBoard releases this month, in time for the American Library Association’s (ALA) annual conference. On the occasion, LJ caught up with ­Mitchell Davis, chief business officer of BiblioLabs, to hear how this collaboration originated and where both SELF-e and BiblioBoard are headed.

Librarians’ Picks | Library by Design, Spring 2015

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New construction/renovations offer the opportunity to try new ideas in furnishings and design. Here are a few that delighted staff and users alike.

Product Sourcebook | Library by Design, Spring 2015

Lake Collection (top l.)
Arcadia Spot (top r.)
MOSS | 3 Collection (middle l.)
Cellular (middle r.)
America (bottom r.)

Library by Design’s new Product Sourcebook, debuting here, spotlights a curated selection of newly introduced library furnishings and finishings in key purchasing categories, which will rotate in each issue. This inaugural version highlights soft seating and displays.

Branching Out | Library by Design, Spring 2015

Mitchell Park Library and Community Center, Palo Alto, CA

SOUTH The new Northside Branch of the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library, Charlottesville, VA, opened on March 16. The 30,000 square foot, $11.8 million facility in what was a hardware supply store replaces its 16,000 square foot 1991 shopping center predecessor. The HBM Architects–designed library features a Maker space; conference rooms; a dedicated teen space with music […]

A Moving Target | One Cool Thing

CAN’T BEAT CITY HALL The temporary library in Park City’s city hall attracts employees and visitors alike

When UTAH’s Park City Library closed for renovations for 12 to 15 months in May 2014, staff had the usual big question to answer: What do we do with the materials? In Park City, the situation was particularly challenging because there were no branches to which materials could be moved and no buildings in the city large enough to house the complete collection. Staying open during the renovation proved impossible. However, the town’s 8,500 residents—and some three million visitors, attracted by skiing and the Sundance Film Festival—still needed access.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 1, 2015 Issue

Representing small libraries, book kids like in schools, and Hugo Awards controversy in the letters to the editor from the June 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal

Library People News | June 1, 2015

Bailey appointed Director of the Morgan Library & Museum, Bero named Executive Director of Algonquin Area Public Library District, Kirchner to be University Librarian at York University, and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the June 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal

Branching Out, June 2015

Chula Vista Public Library, CA, opened community space, the Hub; renovation of the Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library will begin on August 1, and more new construction and renovation news from the June 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Still Invisible: Despite decades of advocacy, libraries are… | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

Enjoying retirement, I was watching my second old flick on TCM when Lillian Gerhardt called. She is the former editor of School Library Journal, and we worked together for a decade or more many years ago. Both of us were totally engaged, maybe obsessed, with libraries and the profession and addicted American Library Association (ALA) critics. I was happy to hear that, like me, she was still watching the association. This time she urged me to comment on “The Advocacy Continuum” by ALA executive director Keith Fiels in the May issue of American Libraries (p. 6–7).