April 20, 2014

Managing Libraries

Give Them What They Want | The User Experience

Aaron Schmidt

What would happen if your library’s website disappeared? You’d probably get a lot of phone calls. f I had to guess, most would be about: Finding library items, renewing library items, and library hours and locations. This thought experiment gives us some perspective about the things library websites should be focusing on—the critical tasks users are trying to accomplish. It also offers perspective on the aspects of our websites that are comparatively unimportant—everything else.

Leading the Change Home | Insights and Outcomes

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When librarian Elke Bruton from the State Library of Oregon (pictured) and four of her colleagues attended Lead the Change! Oregon at Portland’s Central Library in April 2013, they were told they should give a report when they got back. But, she tells LJ, “We said, we don’t want to do that. Out of context, it doesn’t mean anything.” Instead, the team met to digest their own takeaways and turn them into training for their ­coworkers.

Movers & Shakers 2014

Movers & Shakers 2014

Welcome to the 2014 LJ Movers & Shakers. The 50 individuals recognized here are passionate about what all types of libraries can do to enhance lives—for adults, teens, schoolchildren, infants, and toddlers. If there’s a common theme among their profiles, it’s that as much as the library is a place to go, it is also a place on the go—to wherever patrons or potential patrons are. The Class of 2014 brings the total number of Movers to over 650. It was difficult to select just 50 people to honor from the more than 225 nominations we received. There’s not one Mover, however, who hasn’t told us that they couldn’t succeed without their colleagues, so, in effect, the Movers & Shakers represent hundreds more who work in and for libraries.

Measuring Outcomes | Design4Impact

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Whether a library is designing a building or a program, the first premise of designing for impact is figuring out what impact you’re trying to make and how you’re going to assess whether that impact is occurring. One of the most common buzzwords in librarianship today is “outcomes, not outputs.” In other words, measuring not quantitative metrics of what libraries do, such as circulation or visits, but what impact those activities have on the lives of their patrons.

Paralibrarian of the Year 2014: Clancy Pool

Clancy Pool

Hired in 1992 as manager of the tiny St. John Branch (SJB) of Washington State’s Whitman County Rural Library District (WCRLD), Clancy Pool worked to perform the miracle of bringing a new spirit and library to the town’s 525 residents, plus another 500 who live in the surrounding area.

Looking for and Learning from Leadership Stories | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

There are many ways to learn about leadership. One we may overlook is stories of great leaders—and sometimes leaders who faltered. If great leaders are learners, leadership stories have much to offer.

Stepping Up on Usability | Insights and Outcomes

Monroe County Library System (MCLS) and Rochester Public Library (RPL), NY, director Patricia Uttaro credits LJ’s Lead the Change event with turning multiple small projects that had been happening across the district into a more cohesive structure capable of affecting broader change.

Doing the Math: Managing Academic Libraries With Data In Mind

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This past December, LJ teamed up with Electronic Resources and Libraries (ER&L) to dive deep into the use of data-driven decision-making in academic libraries in a series of three free webcasts. The series, moderated by Bonnie Tijerina, head of e-resources and serials at Harvard Library and ER&L conference coordinator—and made possible thanks to sponsorship by ProQuest, Springer, and Innovative Interfaces—­explored a range of strategies academic libraries are deploying as they use data to serve their customers more ­effectively.

Can, Should, and Will, Pt. 2: Science and Religion in the Library | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

Let me start out by acknowledging that “Science and Religion in the Library” is a provocative subtitle, and to some degree it’s meant to be. Let me explain what I mean by it. For my purposes here, I’m going to define as “science” those aspects of library work that deal with figuring out and describing things as they are, and as “religion” those that deal with figuring out how things should be and why they should be that way. In the sense that I’m using the terms here, science is descriptive, and religion is prescriptive; science is involved with “is” questions, while religion is involved with “should” questions.

Make the Right Move

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Bill Overton will never forget moving the Morris Library at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. As president and CEO of Overton & Associates, Westminster, MD, he has spent the past 27 years relocating libraries, but this was his biggest job, at 1.6 million volumes.