October 6, 2015

Border Crossing: An inter-city initiative extends impact | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

An inspirational level of collaboration has been undertaken between San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. A memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed at the end of 2014 has set in motion deeper cross-cultural collaborations and opened opportunities to expand efforts already under way between these sister cities divided by one of the busiest international borders in the world.

Rethink the Staff Workplace | Library by Design, Spring 2015

COLLABORATE & LISTEN Staff, like patrons, need flexible spaces in which 
to work together, as illustrated by North Carolina State University’s Hunt Library. 
Photo by Brent Brafford/NCSU

As libraries make their public-facing spaces more people-focused and mobile tech makes big us/them service desks obsolete, it’s important to ensure that staff have creativity-enhancing spaces of their own along with the work processes, tools, and training to be effective.

Small Libraries, Big Impact | Award Retrospective, 2005-2015

collage of Best Small Library in America LJ covers

The Best Small Library in America award was created in 2005 to honor libraries that meet the challenges of smaller budgets, space, technology, and collections and still find ways to bring expanded, innovative, and supportive services to their smaller communities. Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, for the past decade the award has encouraged and showcased exemplary work in libraries serving populations under 25,000. Judging criteria include creativity in developing model services and programs, innovations in public access computing, demonstrated community support, and evidence of the library’s role as community center. This year LJ looks back to see how the award has influenced the winning libraries, their communities, and their futures.

Author! Author! | Programming

GRAND PRIZE Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award winner Ann Patchett (signing) at Tulsa City-County Library. Photo by John Fancher

Public libraries are all about access: to services, to data, to books. Offering patrons access to some of their favorite authors is a bonus but an important one. Author events strengthen the existing bonds between readers and books: seeing an author read from his or her work and having the chance to ask questions—or just hear the answers—offers a new dimension of engagement. But these events also reinforce the idea of the library as a point of entry into people’s reading lives, beyond simple readers’ advisory. The landscape of author events is continually changing. As programming budgets shrink and authors’ publicity tours get smaller, even libraries with successful track records need to be increasingly nimble and imaginative. While the choice depends on a library’s resources, location, and patron demographics, there are a few best practices that can help librarians develop exciting and well-attended programs.

Building a Display-Driven Strategy | Brand Insider

GO DEEP Clustering copies from multiple branches allows a display that circulation doesn’t destroy, such as this one at Anythink. Photo courtesy of Anythink Libraries

Finding great books is getting even harder now as more and more books are published every year. Nearly a million new books flooded the market last year alone—about half of them self-published. LJ’s Patron Profiles data shows that libraries can be a great source for book discovery—32 percent of patrons find books to read or borrow from libraries. But there are still many more readers to reach. Readers’ advisory and online discovery both continue to play big roles in connecting readers to new titles, authors, and even genres they might not have sought out on their own. In the physical space, there is much more that can be done by reinventing how libraries approach the art of the display.

The Next Level: Library leadership starts here | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

Lead the Change, now entering its fourth year, has illustrated to us just how deep the need is for leadership development. A 2014 survey of 550-plus Movers & Shakers stressed the need for the entire staff to be up to speed on innovations in libraries and personal leadership.

Movers & Shakers 2015


Passion. Vision. Mission. These are just a few of the words that characterize the 50 individuals—and one organization—named 2015 Movers & Shakers.

Gifted Libraries

TELLING ONE STORY New York Public Library’s Readers & Writers Shop in the iconic Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Photo by Jonathan Blanc

Going beyond books, library gift shops are raising funds and awareness for a growing number of Friends and foundations. Libraries have long held sales of deaccessioned or donated books once or twice a year, usually run by all-volunteer Friends of the Library organizations. Many have dedicated spaces or rooms where books can be purchased year-round. These in-house used bookshops are moneymakers for libraries, with stock that’s often liberally seeded with last year’s best sellers. Following the lead of many bookstores, libraries are discovering a strong source of fundraising revenue in nonbook merchandise.

Too Much Leadership Advice? Focus on Your Philosophy | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

With the huge volume of leadership advice that’s generated weekly what’s a leader supposed to do? It’s not only the lack of time for taking it all in, but to what extent should it influence your leadership style.

Vickery Bowles, Moving the Toronto Public Library into the Future


On January 5 Vickery Bowles became Toronto’s newest city librarian. Bowles has been with the Toronto Public Library (TPL) for 32 years, most recently as director of collections management and citywide services, and will now oversee one of the world’s busiest library systems, with 99 (soon to be 100) branches, some 2,000 employees, and 10 million items in its collections.