December 19, 2014

Beaten Before We Start | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

I don’t call myself a futurist, though I do find enjoyment and sometimes enlightenment in watching what’s going on in the world and trying to extrapolate toward what academic libraries might want to do about it. I also harbor a strong love for examples of novel services and fresh ideas about longstanding services, though I’m old and scarred enough not to take them quite at face value—there’s almost always struggle and conflict behind the scenes that does not get aired in order to keep the peace among librarian colleagues.

Serendipitous Discovery: Is it Getting Harder? | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Few would argue against the value of serendipitous discovery, especially when it happens in the library. Is it possible that the evolution of libraries and related technology is making it less likely?

Creating the Future of Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last two columns I explored what I called the “mess of ebooks” and explained what I want from library ebooks. In this column I want to discuss a possible future that could be good for libraries and for publishers. Right now everything is in flux. Publishers are understandably wary of selling Digital Rights Management (DRM)-free ebooks to libraries, and the patron driven acquisition (PDA) model some libraries want might not be sustainable for publishers. Libraries are struggling to buy books at all. The library ebook market is in a state of flux. There’s opportunity in chaos, though, and the opportunity here is to create a future that’s good for everyone, from publishers to library users.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, December 2014 Issue

Speaking up about sexual harassment; librarianship as a second career; to warn or not to warn; what’s wanted from ebooks, and more letters to the editor from the December 2014 issue of Library Journal.

Repair or Replace ALA/APA!: Professional organization or tax dodge? | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

The American Library Association’s (ALA)Allied Professional Association (APA) recently sent a message to the members of the ALA Council and other “member leaders.” With the help of Al Kagan, who represents ALA’s Social Responsibilities Round Table on Council, we saw the message and were reminded that since APA’s founding in 2001, we have never fully understood what it is or does, whether it is a real association or just a tax dodge.

What Makes the Charleston Conference SO Darn Good? | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

I recently got back from the 2014 Charleston Conference (CC), and once again, Katina Strauch and Co. hit a bases-loaded home run with it. I’m incredibly rejuvenated, reinvigorated, and inspired—and based on what I hear from friends and colleagues, that’s the effect this conference has on lots of folks. Just what is it about the […]

Frenemies 2: The Noisy and the Important | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

In a recent column I discussed some of the complexities that we have to deal with when trying to figure out which tasks and processes should be performed as perfectly as possible and which ones can be done to the point of “good enough” and then left behind for more important ones.

What’s Your Personal Mission? | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

Good leaders need to be focused and consistent. It pushes them to achieve their goals in a way that followers can anticipate and count on. Having a personal mission statement can help leaders stay true to this fundamental approach.

Getting Real About Privacy: Confidentiality, digital literacy, and beyond | Editorial

We need to reexamine how we talk about privacy. It’s hard to go a day right now without seeing a major article addressing privacy concerns—be it about personal financial data; the ability to track student progress and report it to parents, teachers, or advisors; new Facebook settings; the stalled USA Freedom Act; and so on. The alarm has been sounded, but the prevailing lack of response is still unnerving.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, November 15, 2014 Issue

We need more reviews of self-published books; a report for libraries whose local government doesn’t get it; the bittersweet feelings of retirement, and more letters to the November 15, 2014 issue of Library Journal.