June 30, 2016

Rethinking the Much-Dreaded Employee Evaluation | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

They may be a bit of a pain, but employee performance assessments have their place in continuous worker improvement. The question for leaders is, is there a better way to manage the process?

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 15, 2016 Issue

Highlighting resources, sticking up for designers, are bathrooms services?, and more letters to editor from the June 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

What Do We Need to Stop Doing? A Survey | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl-LaGuardia

As I look at the many areas in which libraries are working, thriving, and expanding (see Where Are We Headed? An Unscientific Survey, Not Dead Yet, October 15, 2015), the question occurs to me: do we need to consider not doing some things so that we can do those things our researchers need us to do?

Library Emoji | Office Hours

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We spend a lot of time talking about new and emerging literacies in our field. Conceptualizing how information is created, shared, and understood becomes especially intriguing when we add a new language to the mix, a language that many citizens globally understand. Consider this: 92 percent of all people online use emoji as a means to convey information and emotion. A recent piece in Wired by Clive Thompson, “The Emoji Is the Birth of a New Type of Language (No Joke),” exploring this phenomenon got me thinking about what it might mean for communication, sharing, and interaction with others and with libraries.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 1, 2016 Issue

Don’t punish businesses, a call for OER, starstruck by Charlie, and more letters to editor from the June 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

The Power of Words: Answering the call to action on inclusion | Editorial

RebeccaWebEdit2015

I hadn’t heard of the Diversity Council of Australia’s #WordsAtWork campaign until my feed lit up with its call to remove the word guys from workplace use. The comments express conflicting perspectives on whether it was on target or over the top in terms of political correctness. While I basically agree with the council—I’d already been working to break my habit of using guys when addressing colleagues at LJ and School Library Journal (SLJ), a team predominantly made up of women—the full-throated response made me reflect on how challenging and necessary such conversations are.

We Need a Growth Mindset for Learning Library Research | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Students are motivated to learn when they believe they have the need and the capacity to acquire and master a new skill. Students come to college thinking they’ve mastered research. How can we help them discover they still have room to grow?

Keep Copyright at LC | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

Copyright is the only right defined in the main text of the U.S. Constitution. It is specified in Article 1, Section 8, so it didn’t have to be added in the amendments known as the Bill of Rights, which tells us how important the concept of copyright was to the founders. They enumerated its dimensions in a sparse sentence: “To promote the Progress of science and useful Arts by securing for limited times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”

Flipped Classroom Tech Teaching | Field Reports

Allyson Coan

A few weeks ago, the Skokie Public Library (SPL) finished its four-week “Cracking the HTML Code: Build Your Own Website” program using a MOOC/flipped classroom mashup. Now in its fourth iteration, this class has had successes, failures, and everything in between. Needless to say, we’ve learned a lot about what works and what doesn’t.

The Case for Informed Browsing | Backtalk

Lynn Lobash

Netflix knows something that libraries haven’t figured out yet: how to create categories that help people browse online in an informed yet serendipitous way.