March 3, 2015

Ingenuity Unleashed: The spur of the Knight Challenge | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

There was much excitement when the James L. Knight Foundation opened a News Challenge for Libraries last September—for good reason. Libraries were getting a highly visible shout-out from this national foundation, and library enthusiasts were being asked to share ideas in a setting that encouraged collaboration to deepen the impact of library work. The process surfaced mission-focused ingenuity across the library landscape, highlighted the smarts in our field, and should serve as motivation for leadership to find new ways to enable latent capacity in our libraries to serve our communities better.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, February 15, 2015 Issue

The pros and cons of community college for all, library marketing, the need for shooter safety, and more letters to the editor form the February 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Privilege in the Framework | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

Now that the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is finished, I finally got around to reading it. I was often critical of parts of the information literacy standards, but haven’t found much to criticize about the “Framework,” although I know others have. Most of the “threshold concepts” are things I’ve been talking about with students for years, so there’s little in it that seems particularly new, except thinking of such ideas as threshold concepts. There was one thing that surprised me, though: the recognition of various forms of privilege.

Too Much Leadership Advice? Focus on Your Philosophy | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

With the huge volume of leadership advice that’s generated weekly what’s a leader supposed to do? It’s not only the lack of time for taking it all in, but to what extent should it influence your leadership style.

CC BY and Its Discontents–A Growing Challenge for Open Access | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

Recently I attended the conference of a major learned society in the humanities. I was only there for a day, and attended only two sessions: one as a panelist and the other as an observer. Both sessions dealt with issues related to Open Access (OA), and in both of them I was deeply taken aback by the degree to which the scholars in attendance—not universally, but by an overwhelming majority—expressed frustration and even outright anger at the OA community. The word “predatory” was actually used at one point—not in reference to rapacious publishers, but to OA advocates. That was pretty shocking.

Paul Worster, Multimodal Learning Librarian | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

A little while ago an announcement came out through the library list that my colleague, Paul Worster, has been appointed Multimodal Learning Librarian here at Harvard. Having worked with (and learned from) Paul in his previous incarnation as Multimedia Librarian, I had some idea of what he used to do, but I was really intrigued by this new job, wondering just what it entails. So I thought I’d ask him about the position and share the interview with LJ’s readers since the job sounds cutting edge (and fascinating!), and maybe could be a good career development path for both newer and seasoned librarians.

Coffee Cup Stories | Programs That Pop

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Espresso culture arrived a bit late in Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), as urban trends often do in Australian country towns. Yet sometimes it’s possible for a small community to outpace the zeitgeist. In ours, we decided to connect the community to libraries and literacy through coffee.

Top 10 Academic Library Issues for 2015 | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

The beginning of the year brings many “top” lists for what to look for in 2015. So far there’s not much predicting for what looks big for the academic library world. Here’s a shot at it.

What’s Your Pitch? | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Speaking here and there, I’ve logged a few airline miles over the years and visited some pretty cool places. A short while ago, I was coming back from the New York Library Association conference, flying from Albany to Chicago, and I was seated next to a friendly young man who asked me what I did for a living.

The Long Good Fight: Libraries at the heart of intellectual freedoms | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

Librarians and libraries are essential to discourse about intellectual freedoms. Now we have more work to do in light of violent efforts to curtail such rights, perhaps most notably the January 7 attack on the offices of Paris’s weekly Charlie Hebdo. For me, these events brought our work to date into high relief but also intensified a sense of urgency about what librarians can do to defend a richer understanding of the value of freedom of inquiry and expression.