November 1, 2014

What I Want from Library Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last column I discussed the various problems that I have with ebooks for academic libraries. Now I’d like to lay out what I want from library ebooks and what it would take for me to switch from print to electronic as the preferred format for books.

Sell Your Ideas Like a Shark Is Listening | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

You’ve got a great idea for your library. You think it’s a slam dunk for success. No one else is listening and you’re frustrated. Maybe you need a new approach.

Permission to Publish, In Defense of Convenience, and more Feedback

Letting go of permission requirements for use of special collections; why convenience isn’t a death knell for libraries; why library schools should teach advocacy, and more Letters to LJ’s October 15, 2014 issue

On the ROAD to Open Access (and Charleston) | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

I want to give a big shout-out to wonderful Katina Strauch for alerting me to the ROAD Directory of Open Access scholarly Resources, a service offered by the ISSN International Centre with the support of the Communication and Information Sector of UNESCO. They have a four-fold stated purpose:

How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of the recent revelations about privacy incursions in the latest version of Adobe Digital Editions.

Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment.

Always Doesn’t Live Here Anymore | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Some of the most creative and flexible librarians I know have been working for more than a few years in libraries. Some of the most inspiring and influential professionals in our field have had distinguished careers and still continue to make a mark on our governance and future. I was lucky to learn about collection development, reference service, and weeding during my public library days from professionals who had worked in the system for multiple decades. These are the same folks who did not shy away from the Internet and its affordances in the mid 1990s.

View from the Top: Susan Hildreth’s insight on collective impact | Editorial

ljx141002webeditorialHildrethCV1

When President Barack Obama appointed Susan H. Hildreth as director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in 2011, many in the profession knew we were in for a robust four years of activity by that federal agency. Hildreth had already been influencing the library landscape for years in major leadership roles, including time heading major public libraries (San Francisco and Seattle) and the California State Library.

My Salute to Librarians | Backtalk

Warren Adler

From the moment I entered the hushed, sacred precinct of the Brownsville Children’s Library in Brownsville, Brooklyn, back in the mid-1930s, I have been a passionate advocate of the public library. That love affair with libraries inspired a lifetime of heavy patronage in every part of the country I have lived. In my twelve-year stay in Jackson Hole, WY, I helped shepherd our lovely little library from a log cabin, into what is now one of the best modern libraries in the Midwest. I was enormously proud to serve as its president.

Redefining What Discovery Means | Peer to Peer Review

Barbara Fister

A recent Ithaka report by Roger Schonfeld asks “Does Discovery Still Happen in the Library?” My immediate thought was “did it ever?” quickly followed by “why do we assume it should?