July 24, 2016

Feedback: Letters to LJ, July 2016 Issue

Boosting Orlando, art large and small, an elephant in the (library) room, and more letters to editor from the July, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Pure Escapism | Programs That Pop

IT’S A LOCK (Clockwise from top l.): Kids create the puzzles for the library escape room; Morton-James PL director Rasmus Thoegersen made up as a zombie; and all the zombies get ready for their moment

What do you do with an old storage room? With the help of a grant, around 40 kids, four months, and a lot of hard work and creativity, the Morton-James Public Library was able to transform a nondescript storage area into a real-life immersive puzzle game—­Nebraska City’s first escape room (and the first escape room in the world built by kids, as far as we can tell).

From Pariah to Partner: Wikipedia’s Growing Campus Presence | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

For years, many faculty members wanted nothing to with Wikipedia and actively discouraged its use by students. With support from academic librarians, higher ed is taking a whole new look at Wikipedia as an educational resource.

Local Supports Local | Sustainability

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Empower. Engage. Energize. These three words describe the relationship between a sustainable library and its users. It’s a two-way street: a library can empower patrons to do good things by engaging with them to understand their aspirations. A community can feel the authentic interest a library has in being a part of that community’s conversations, whether by being at the table or convening “the table” to find community-based solutions.

Powered by Practice: Linking LIS and library life | Editorial

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The struggle to improve the affinity between library schools and applied librarianship has just gained a powerful ally. In June, the University of Washington’s Information School (iSchool) announced the appointment of its first Distinguished Practitioner in Residence, Susan Hildreth. She is one of the most experienced and visionary librarians in our ranks, having served stints as a library director, state librarian, head of consortia, and, most notably, director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Rethinking the Much-Dreaded Employee Evaluation | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

They may be a bit of a pain, but employee performance assessments have their place in continuous worker improvement. The question for leaders is, is there a better way to manage the process?

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 15, 2016 Issue

Highlighting resources, sticking up for designers, are bathrooms services?, and more letters to editor from the June 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

What Do We Need to Stop Doing? A Survey | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl-LaGuardia

As I look at the many areas in which libraries are working, thriving, and expanding (see Where Are We Headed? An Unscientific Survey, Not Dead Yet, October 15, 2015), the question occurs to me: do we need to consider not doing some things so that we can do those things our researchers need us to do?

Library Emoji | Office Hours

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We spend a lot of time talking about new and emerging literacies in our field. Conceptualizing how information is created, shared, and understood becomes especially intriguing when we add a new language to the mix, a language that many citizens globally understand. Consider this: 92 percent of all people online use emoji as a means to convey information and emotion. A recent piece in Wired by Clive Thompson, “The Emoji Is the Birth of a New Type of Language (No Joke),” exploring this phenomenon got me thinking about what it might mean for communication, sharing, and interaction with others and with libraries.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 1, 2016 Issue

Don’t punish businesses, a call for OER, starstruck by Charlie, and more letters to editor from the June 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.