February 19, 2017

Feedback: Letters to LJ, February 1, 2017 Issue

Research for everyone, a win for Nevada County, Generation Z on the move, and more letters to editor from the February 1, 2017 issue of Library Journal.

Beyond Fake News | Peer to Peer Review

Photo credit: Kagenmi via ThinkStock

Over the course of the fall semester, I had the opportunity to visit a handful of classes to speak on news literacy. I began by posing the question, “Does the news media take sides?” Though a small sample, nearly 100 percent of students I polled distrusted the media. I found this wariness of the mainstream media echoed throughout classes I visited — on campuses ranging from rural Humphreys County to just a few miles outside downtown Nashville—as I quizzed students on their news habits.

OER’s Road Ahead is Paved with Publisher Platforms | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Academic librarians are pleased with the progress they’ve made in leading their campuses to recognize the value of Open Educational Resources (OER). Now publishers are responding to OER with new learning platforms. It may be time for a new strategy.

The Devalued MLIS: ALA’s Leader Must Be a Librarian | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

For nearly all 140 years of the existence of the American Library Association (ALA), its Executive Director (ED) has been a professional librarian. Today, the credential required to ensure that the ED is a librarian is the Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) degree. However, a group of ALA councilors and Executive Board members apparently wanted to change that.

Arming the Ramparts | Sustainability

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The sustainability of our world depends on a strong social fabric in local communities where people know and respect one another. This social fabric is key for resilient communities in the face of environmental, economic, and social disruption. That fabric is now torn in many places thanks to the vitriol and viciousness of the presidential election and fears about what will happen next.

Losing a Library: A Community That Gives Up its Library Gives Up On Itself | Editorial

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On April 1, the people of Oregon’s Douglas County will see ten of their 11 libraries close. The last, the main, will soon follow. This decision by the county Board of Commissioners, announced January 9, is a sad outcome to a long battle to keep the system open. For those who live there, it will mean a devastating loss of a key cultural hub along with the access to information, expertise, technology, stories, voices from around the world, a book-rich environment, and all the skill development, inspiration, and aspiration these resources offer. It’s a loss the community at large should not take lightly.

Introducing VR | Field Reports

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To support the changing needs of faculty and students researching mass media, popular culture, and video games, the University of North Texas (UNT) Media Library, Denton, began developing a game collection in 2009. This collection first included console games and in-house access to gaming PCs and then grew to include tabletop games in 2010. Because virtual reality (VR) headsets and devices are a natural fit, we included VR equipment on our wish list until 2015, when we finally had funding for an Oculus Rift DK2 ($350).

A Unified Voice: Confronting an Assault on Information | Editorial

RebeccaWebEdit2015

I wrote recently that the rate of media illiteracy is the information crisis of our time (“Faked Out,” School Library Journal, 1/17, p. 6), but now that very real issue has nonetheless been trumped by a full-on deliberate assault on the flow of information—from journalism and scientific research to dissemination via social media and traditional channels. There is no such thing as an alternate fact, but there is certainly an alternate reality: a chilling, censorial, obfuscating one being offered as a threatening new normal by the new federal administration in the first days and weeks of 2017.

ALA Goes Looking for a Leader | Leading From the Library

Steven Bell

There’s no debate that it will be hard to replace the American Library Association (ALA)’s current Executive Director (ED). But there’s plenty of debate over the next ED’s qualifications. Should the MLS be required? Or do we look for the best association leader we can find?

Feedback: Letters to LJ, January 2017 Issue

Numbers point toward an amazingly inclusive society, in praise of Millennial computer knowledge, considering the individuals, and more letters to editor from the January 1, 2017 issue of Library Journal.