November 24, 2014

1,000 Words | Insights and Outcomes

GET GRAPHIC: Ad/lib's clean look practices what it preaches

We’re all familiar with the old saying that a picture is worth 1,000 words. But when it comes to communication with our patrons, whether existing or potential, many in libraryland are more comfortable crafting the 1,000 words than the graphics to sit alongside—or replace—them.

Willa | Not Dead Yet

RendingtheGarment-Cover

I had the great good fortune of going to a reading by the poet Willa Schneberg the other day. I’ve been hearing about Willa, who is a friend of a friend, for years, yet had never had the pleasure of meeting her until her reading. She is both a gifted poet and a moving reader of her poetry.

A Love Note to Keynotes | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

Once, toward the start of my librarian career, I set three different alarms so I wouldn’t miss an early-morning conference keynote. I sense I should be embarrassed by this, as keynotes and keynoters are now spoken of with the genteelly horrified disdain Wodehousian elders reserved for unmarried chorines, but it’s still true, and I am not ashamed.

Looking For Clues: How Faculty Use and Think About Technology | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Gaining insights into how faculty use different technologies in the classroom and for their own research, as well as how they view new modes of higher education, could help academic librarians discover new opportunities to support and collaborate with their faculty.

United We Stand: Reflecting on the Aspen report | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

There is much to think about in “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries,” the first and much anticipated report of the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries (AIDPL), released last month at the New York Public Library (ow.ly/CSN7z). While just a start in practical terms, it begins to reframe the role and position of public libraries in light of the possibilities brought by the digital age. Importantly, it describes a more robust, interconnected network of vital institutions, geared to impact the lives of even more people in the communities they serve. As a framing device, a sort of charter on what libraries are today and could become, it is inspiring, challenging, and useful.

What I Want from Library Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last column I discussed the various problems that I have with ebooks for academic libraries. Now I’d like to lay out what I want from library ebooks and what it would take for me to switch from print to electronic as the preferred format for books.

Sell Your Ideas Like a Shark Is Listening | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

You’ve got a great idea for your library. You think it’s a slam dunk for success. No one else is listening and you’re frustrated. Maybe you need a new approach.

Permission to Publish, In Defense of Convenience, and more Feedback

Letting go of permission requirements for use of special collections; why convenience isn’t a death knell for libraries; why library schools should teach advocacy, and more Letters to LJ’s October 15, 2014 issue

On the ROAD to Open Access (and Charleston) | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

I want to give a big shout-out to wonderful Katina Strauch for alerting me to the ROAD Directory of Open Access scholarly Resources, a service offered by the ISSN International Centre with the support of the Communication and Information Sector of UNESCO. They have a four-fold stated purpose:

How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of the recent revelations about privacy incursions in the latest version of Adobe Digital Editions.