June 29, 2015

Appreciate Your Higher Ed Curmudgeon | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Academic librarians probably know at least one curmudgeon at their institution—or in their library. A new study explores the nature of curmudgeons in higher ed and why we should appreciate them more.

Border Crossing: An inter-city initiative extends impact | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

An inspirational level of collaboration has been undertaken between San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. A memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed at the end of 2014 has set in motion deeper cross-cultural collaborations and opened opportunities to expand efforts already under way between these sister cities divided by one of the busiest international borders in the world.

The Budget Dance: State funding is not “low-hanging fruit” | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

The legislative budget season triggers a tense cycle for libraries, and this year is no different. State library funding comes under attack, and library advocates mount a defense. Where wisdom prevails, the lines are upheld or even increased, bolstering the key infrastructure libraries bring to our communities. Where short-term thinking trumps strategic insight, the lines get trimmed and trimmed, gaining a relatively minor lift to the state’s bottom line while putting at risk small but significant programs that interconnect our valuable public library resources—and serve as a critical conduit for federal funds to reinforce service.

Researcher: What You Got? | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Let’s take some advice from sex columnist Dan Savage to improve connections between research and practice. Savage’s Lovecast podcast features a segment called “What You Got?” highlighting recent studies from sex and relationship researchers. Savage gives scholars a few minutes of airtime to report on how their findings might relate to listeners. What a brilliant way to get the word out about research! Maybe a similar segment could find its way to Steve Thomas’s “Circulating Ideas” podcast, a show I always enjoy.

You’re a Good Leader, But Are You a Thought Leader? | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

The term ‘thought leader’ tends to be associated with negative perceptions. Perhaps it isn’t as bad as we have made it out to be. What exactly is it, and does our profession benefit from thought leadership? Might you be a thought leader?

Adult Learners in the Library–Are they Being Served? | Peer to Peer Review

Makiba Foster, left, and Kris Helbling, right

Like many academic librarians, after completing the marathon of the traditional school year, we often use the summer semester to reflect, revise, and plan for the upcoming fall. In the summer of 2012, during a casual conversation in which we shared stories about rewarding reference interactions, we stumbled upon an “a-ha moment,” discovering an opportunity to connect targeted library outreach with an underserved user group. During this exchange, we realized how much we both enjoy working with adult learners and how they always seem genuinely interested in gaining skills to make themselves better library users, and therefore better students. This conversation became the catalyst for an idea of a library course designed specifically for adult learners returning to the classroom.

Printing with Purpose | Field Reports

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It was back in April 2014 that we first met. The Makerbot Replicator and I, that is. I work at the Half Hollow Hills Community Library (HHHCL) in Dix Hills, NY, and we are part of the Suffolk County Library System, located on the eastern half of Long Island. Our library system has a bit of a reputation for being smart and ahead of the curve with technology, and when HHHCL heard of its out-of-the-box idea of circulating a 3-D printer among member libraries, we couldn’t wait to sign up. Our turn came last April.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, May 1, 2015 Issue

Reforming LIS, revisiting the revamped Dothan Houston County Library System, and remembering Cathie Linz in letters to the editor from May 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal

Why Internet Searches Are Not Enough | Peer to Peer Review

George Ledin

Historians are used to sleuthing. Obtaining verifiable sources is difficult; original documents may be unavailable. With computer searching methods some of the detective work has eased up, at least superficially. However search engines depend on databases that can be parsed and queried digitally. Whatever is not in these databases is unreachable except in person. Great strides have been made thanks to the Internet, and online techniques are useful tools, but their help is always limited.

The search for Rodríguez’s “Chinese Poem” is a case study in how, despite strong efforts and advanced technological approaches, searches cannot be guaranteed to succeed.

What Will We Do When Students Drop the Big Package Deal? | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

We have multiple categories of students to deal with: traditional, non-traditional, distance, first-gen. Swirlers are an emerging demographic. How will academic librarians meet their needs?