September 27, 2016

Feedback: Letters to LJ, August 2016 Issue

A call for academic RA research, the unchanging lack of inclusion, and more letters to editor from the August 2016 issue of Library Journal.

We Talked About Failure | Backtalk

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The Utah Library Association (ULA) dove headfirst into failure on February 19–20. Along with the Salt Lake City Public Library (SLCPL), ULA hosted Strikethrough: The Utah Library Association Failure Workshop. Billed as an interdisciplinary discussion of failure for librarians, it brought together librarians, medical doctors, and performance artists.

The Difference between Copyright Infringement and Plagiarism—and Why It Matters | Peer to Peer Review

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Reading a recent article in the Atlantic and the subsequent comments, I was struck again by how much confusion there is among the public about the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement.

The Research Journey | Office Hours

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Since 2014, academic librarians from across the United States have gathered at Loyola Marymount University (LMU) in Los Angeles to be part of an immersive learning experience—the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL).

Bandwidth Blues: Satisfying an Insatiable Appetite for Connectivity | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

What’s expensive to provide and it seems that there is never enough to go around on a college campus? There’s a reason your students are always complaining about your library’s Wi-Fi.

Life in the Bike Lane: Designing livable cities from the street up | Editorial

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On Leap Day this past February, I gave myself the gift of a Citi Bike membership. In New York City, where Library Journal’s office is located, this bike-sharing service hit the streets in 2013 and has continued to gain traction ever since. Like many, it has had growing pains, but it now touts over 100,000 annual members, and this summer it celebrated a record of 56,000 trips in one day. I ride for part of my commute, replacing what would be an underground subway leg with three-plus miles on the surface. This has given New York back to me, reinvigorating my relationship with the city and allowing me to witness its changeable beauty.

Crisis Leadership Takes On a New Meaning | Leading from the Library

Steven Bell

Unexpected acts of hatred, violence, and destruction are occurring more frequently. These dark crises impact everyone in an organization, but wise leaders can contribute to a better emotional climate if they know how to respond.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, July 2016 Issue

Boosting Orlando, art large and small, an elephant in the (library) room, and more letters to editor from the July, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Pure Escapism | Programs That Pop

IT’S A LOCK (Clockwise from top l.): Kids create the puzzles for the library escape room; Morton-James PL director Rasmus Thoegersen made up as a zombie; and all the zombies get ready for their moment

What do you do with an old storage room? With the help of a grant, around 40 kids, four months, and a lot of hard work and creativity, the Morton-James Public Library was able to transform a nondescript storage area into a real-life immersive puzzle game—­Nebraska City’s first escape room (and the first escape room in the world built by kids, as far as we can tell).

From Pariah to Partner: Wikipedia’s Growing Campus Presence | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

For years, many faculty members wanted nothing to with Wikipedia and actively discouraged its use by students. With support from academic librarians, higher ed is taking a whole new look at Wikipedia as an educational resource.