August 1, 2014

Sliding Along | Insights and Outcomes

ALL SMILES At Pasadena Public Library, CA, Director Jan Sanders 
(2d from l.) and her staff display a chart bearing spectra of library service transformation possibilities. Smiley stickers show where each staffer feels the library stands

At Lead the Change workshops, local library leaders help facilitate the presentation, adding their own perspectives on the concepts presented by program developer David Bendekovic. But they don’t usually bring their own visual aids. The Southern California workshop, held on May 15 at the Pasadena Public Library (PPL), was an exception. PPL director Jan Sanders brought a giant foamcore version of one of Bendekovic’s slides, on which she’d asked library staff members to plot where they felt their library stood.

In the Moment | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Librarians, are you present in your work? Are you listening when someone asks a question at the desk? LIS students, are you there in the classroom or online with an open mind and a thirst for learning? Are you in the moment?

The Next Generation of Librarians: Books that Breathe | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

Over the past couple of years my colleague Kathleen Sheehan and I have been working with a Library Student Interest Group, sponsored by the College Library and the Harvard Undergraduate Council, and we’ve met some great students through this work. Allison Gofman is one of the students who has been part of the LSIG. She is also a photographer. This past year, for her final project in the course, United States in the World 30: Tangible Things: Harvard Collections in World History, Allison created the beautiful online book, Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe. It “is a visual exploration of the libraries as physical spaces: not only as beautiful architecture or as a collection of books, but as a unique intersection of the two.”

Is There a Serials Crisis Yet? Between Chicken Little and the Grasshopper | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

Summer lets me teach my favorite course, the run-down of what’s going on with several publishing industries and how libraries are riding the rapids. (It’s actually a course in environmental awareness and handling change, but such skills are much easier to teach given a concrete context in which to exercise them.) As I tore through syllabus and lecture revisions earlier this month to clear time for other necessary work, I found a few spare milliseconds to wonder whether the serials crisis, which hasn’t felt like an immediate all-hands-on-deck crisis in some time, might finally be heating up into one. Into many, really; the localized nature of serials pricing means that crises hit consortia and individual libraries at varying times, not all of academic librarianship at once.

Common Core 101 for Academic Librarians | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

The Common Core is said to be the most radical innovation to public education in a generation. The average academic librarian has paid little attention. What exactly do academic librarians need to know and does it matter to us?

Trusting Trustees: Have you built an engaged board? | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

I have a theory that too many library trustees are underutilized in their board work. In far too many libraries, fear of meddling and of losing control have meant that directors don’t take advantage of the expertise and talent on their Board of Trustees. Where that is true, library leaders are squandering critical capacity and losing a potent edge in the key task of connecting to the community.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 1, 2014 Issue

Letters to the editor on weeding, deleting seldom-used web content, and leadership from the June 1 issue of Library Journal.

Opinion: Rethinking How We Rate and Rank MLIS Programs | LIS Education

screen shot of Time to Degree table

Throughout the United States and Canada, there are more than 63 ALA-accredited programs offering advanced degrees in library and information science. While the number of programs has grown over the years, the field has yet to develop any significant, rigorous measures of evaluation to assess them. Even as interest in LIS education grows, the tools for determining which programs will match a student’s goals or establishing a hierarchy of quality remain stuck in neutral.

Vive la différence! | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

Every library is unique. Despite all the decades of work trying to standardize library operations, systems, collection organization, buildings, human resource management, governance, and even collection development, each library still differs from every other library. While few librarians would argue that point, it is obvious that a great deal of effort has been expended to make the practice of librarianship more homogeneous.

A Clash of Values | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

I’ve written before about what I called the two cultures that sometimes clash, the commercial culture of a lot of scientific publishing and the gift culture of academia. In addition to clashes of culture, there are clashes of values. Thanks to the recent brouhaha surrounding the Taylor & Francis journal Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation, another clash of values has emerged, that of academics editing a journal to encourage debate and that of commercial publishers trying to stifle debate about their methods.