February 27, 2015

Recognizing My Library Heroes of 2014 | Peer to Peer Review

Barbara Fister

It’s been a rough year for the planet. It’s been a rough year for the country. It’s been a rough year for libraries. We face a lot of problems that are complex and scary and it’s easier to name them than to figure out what to do next. But when I look back on 2014 I see some amazing people doing the things that we librarians profess as our core values. Since there’s something about years coming to an end that leads to lists and resolutions, I thought I’d look back and give a shout out to a few of the librarians who have taken difficult situations and made courageous, difficult, affirming choices. These are just some of the many librarians who make me proud to be in this profession.

America’s College Promise: Potential Impacts for Community College Librarians | Opinion

LJms2014LandingKaufman

Last week, President Obama announced his proposal for America’s College Promise, an initiative aimed at making community college free for all students who maintain a grade point average of 2.5 and make steady progress toward completion. The proposal also requires community colleges to offer academic programs that would transfer fully to public colleges and universities or provide occupational training in areas of high demand by employers.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, January 2015 Issue

Share relevance with electorate as well as elected officials; the revised cost of divestment; objecting to DRM; and more letters to LJ’s January 2015 issue

Charlie Hebdo | Opinion

RDavidLankes

This morning [January 8] in a Tweet Bredebieb asked me “what should public libraries do,” about the Charlie Hebdo attack. It was frankly a bit of a humbling and scary question. After all, I am not in Paris, and I cannot claim to know everything that French libraries do now. However, it would be an obvious act of cowardice to simply claim ignorance or to respond with some high level non-answer like “help the communities have a conversation.” So I provided some ideas. Still, Twitter is not exactly a place to have a deep discussion of where these ideas come from, nor truly share what I think public libraries should do. So in this post I’d like to give a deeper answer to how I feel public libraries should respond to horrific acts like the attacks on Charlie Hebdo.

Actions and Answers | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

Happy New Year to all! It’s that time of the year when we look forward and back. “Top Ten”–style lists appear in our feed readers, revisiting the highs and lows of 2014 and pointing us toward what 2015 will bring.

Making Creative Copyright Law | Peer to Peer Review

Kevin L. Smith

One of the most troubling attitudes I encounter when talking with librarians about copyright is a sort of fatalism. The general idea is that copyright is simply a monolithic, unintelligible barricade that prevents libraries from realizing their full potential.

What Gets You Going and Keeps You Going? | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

A recent mailing from my library school alma mater (SUNY Albany) brought with it the realization that I’ve been a librarian for quite a long time (36 years and 6 months, to be precise, but who’s counting…), and yet, I feel about my work now very much as I did in my first job as a part-time reference librarian at Union College.

Partnering To Advance Openness | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

The year just ended left a lot to desire. For academic librarians it was a mixed bag of the good and bad, giving us cause for optimism while simultaneously leaving us, on occasion, wondering if we were making much progress in bringing change to higher education.

De Blasio’s Opportunity: It’s time to reinvest in NYC’s branch libraries | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

New York City’s libraries get a fair amount of attention, but all too rarely is it directed to the branches. Those neighborhood hubs arguably have the greatest impact and potential, cultivating the essential connection to the community at the most local levels in more than 207 buildings. Unfortunately, according to the Center for an Urban Future, they are also at risk. The time has arrived to embrace a new citywide strategy to deliver excellent library services to all New Yorkers.

Opinion | From Vicious to Virtuous: The collapse of U.K. libraries and unbreaking the cycle of library support

Earlier this month, the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA) released its annual statistics on library use in the U.K. CIPFA found that the number of patrons borrowing books from U.K. libraries has halved since 1997. This isn’t a surprise to anyone who has been following the ongoing financial crisis that’s engulfed those public libraries across the pond. It demonstrates what happens to libraries when they’re not supported by the communities they serve.