May 1, 2016

Bots, Block Chain, and Beacons: Hot Topics at LITA Tech Trends Panel | ALA Midwinter 2016

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Moderator Lisa Bunker, Social Media Librarian for Pima County Public Library (AZ) ; Jason Griffey, founder and principal of consulting and creation firm Evenly Distributed; Jim Hahn, orientation services and environments librarian and associate professor at the University of Illinois Undergraduate Library; Jamie Hollier, co-owner and co-CEO of technology consultancy Anneal; Alex Lent, director of the Millis Public Library (MA); Thomas Padilla, digital scholarship librarian at Michigan State University Libraries; and Ken Varnum, senior program manager for discovery, delivery, and learning analytics at the University of Michigan Library, during the Library Information Technology Association’s (LITA) Top Tech Trends panel at the American Library Association’s 2016 Midwinter conference in Boston.

Ready for the Next Phase | ALA Midwinter 2016

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The American Library Association’s (ALA) 2016 Midwinter Meeting, held January 8–12 in Boston, was pleasingly free of snow—even if the temperature did fluctuate enough, from nearly 60 rainy degrees on Sunday to well below freezing Monday evening, to make packing light impossible. But weather uncertainties took a back seat to the overwhelming atmosphere of positivity at the Boston Convention Center and Exhibition Center and surrounding venues during Midwinter’s 2,400 scheduled meetings and events. There was a strong sense among attendees, panelists, ALA officials, and exhibitors of libraries being poised to step into the next phase—whatever that might be. Below are some of the event’s highlights; more detailed coverage will follow.

LaRue on Taking the Lead at the Office of Intellectual Freedom, Freedom To Read Foundation

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James (Jamie) LaRue, most recently CEO of LaRue & Associates, has been chosen to lead the American Library Association (ALA) Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF) and the Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF), effective January 4, 2016 following the retirement of OIF director Barbara M. Jones on December 31. As former director of the Douglas County, CO, Library System and Colorado Librarian of the Year, LaRue will step into his new roles with hands-on library experience at all levels—local, regional, statewide, and national. He has also served on ALA’s Digital Content Working Group and OCLC’s executive council, as well as writing an LJ column on Self-Publishing and Libraries. LJ caught up with LaRue as he was preparing to relocate close to ALA headquarters in Chicago.

Digital Inclusion Survey: Renovation Matters, Help Happens at Point of Need, and Staff Still Do (Almost) Everything

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In October, the Information Policy & Access Center at University of Maryland (iPAC) and the American Library Association (ALA) released the results and initial analysis from the 2014 Digital Inclusion Survey. iPAC has gathered statistics on public libraries and the Internet for 20 years, and this report highlights the sea change over that time. Of particular note, this survey looked more closely at the relationship between recent renovations or construction (within the past five years) and the ability of libraries to support a full and robust online life for all of a community’s residents—regardless of age, education, and socioeconomic status—by providing free access to public access technologies (hardware, software, high-speed Internet connectivity); a range of digital content; digital literacy services that assist individuals in navigating, understanding, evaluating, and creating content using a range of information and communications technologies; and programs and services around key community need areas such as health and wellness, education, employment and workforce development, and civic engagement.

Patricia K. Galloway | LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award Winner 2015

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Rarely can one find a professor with such a wide and profound knowledge of the fields and disciplines that relate to applying digital technology to development of cultural archives. Professor Patricia K. Galloway, of the iSchool at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin, takes these achievements several levels higher with her record of original and broad scholarship; her many contributions to research and new knowledge in her practice and belief system of cultural archives and historiography; and the roster of current and former students she has led, instructed, and greatly inspired. Together, these achievements moved the judges to name her the winner of the 2015 Library Journal/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award, sponsored by Rowman & Littlefield.

Transformation Time: Sari Feldman hits the right tone | Editorial

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The ALA’s new public awareness initiative is a savvy approach to the broad challenge libraries face as they continue to evolve and must communicate what they actually contribute to their communities. Much more than talk, Libraries Transform is an actionable toolkit you should put to work now to help your constituency understand the real life of libraries.

ALA Launches “Libraries Transform” Campaign

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On October 29 American Library Association (ALA) president Sari Feldman launched the Libraries Transform campaign, a three-year national public awareness initiative focusing on the ways public, academic, school, and special libraries and librarians across the nation transform their communities. Events kicked off in Washington, DC, as the Libraries Transform team visited a cross-section of transformative libraries, and will continue with contributions from libraries—and library lovers—everywhere.

Senate Passes 10 Year Term for Librarian of Congress

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As President Obama ponders his choice for the next Librarian of Congress, the first time in nearly three decades that such a nomination will be necessary, the U.S. Senate has passed a bill to put a ten-year term on the position, stripping the job of the lifetime tenure it has carried since 1802.

ALA Ethnic Affiliates Form Joint Council of Librarians of Color

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Five ethnic affiliates of the American Library Association (ALA) have joined together to form the Joint Council of Librarians of Color, Inc. (JCLC), a nonprofit organization that will work for the common needs of its members. JCLC is comprised of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), the American Indian Library Association (AILA), the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA,) and REFORMA: The National Association to Promote Library & Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. While each of the affiliates will continue as separate entities, advocating for library and literacy issues within their individual constituencies, JCLC will “promote librarianship within communities of color, support literacy and the preservation of history and cultural heritage, collaborate on common issues, and…host the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color,” according to a statement issued June 8.

Susan Schmidt: United for Libraries—Being Seen, Being Heard

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Over the years, the American Library Association (ALA) has hosted a number of divisions that support citizen-run library organizations. Friends of Libraries USA (FOLUSA) joined forces with the Association for Library Trustees and Advocates (ALTA) in 2009 to form the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations (ALTAFF), which is now known as United for Libraries (UFL). Susan Schmidt, immediate past president of Friends of the Little Falls Library and media assistant, Wood Acres Elementary School (both in Bethesda, MD), was elected 2015–16 UFL vice president/president elect in May 2015.