July 26, 2016

Academic Movers & Shakers

LJ goes in depth with Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, delving into just how and why they pulled off the projects that brought them recognition as innovators, change agents, and more. This series of interviews is sponsored by SAGE. For a deeper dive into what made our 2014 Academic Movers so exceptional, download our 20-page collection of insightful interviews.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Sharona Ginsberg

Sharona Ginsberg

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Sharona Ginsberg, MakerBridge Coordinator and learning technologies librarian, at the State University of New York at Oswego. Ginsberg launched the MakerBridge Project—a community with Maker information, tools, and best practices for librarians and educators—when she was still in graduate school at the University of Michigan School of Information, and has made it a point to advocate for inclusiveness in the Maker movement.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Jenna Nolt

Jenna Nolt

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Jenna Nolt, digital initiatives librarian at Kenyon College, Gambier, OH. After a stint digitizing rare books for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Nolt moved to Kenyon’s Olin Library in 2014. In her short time there she has transformed Digital Kenyon, the college’s institutional repository, into a viable and robust resource for both students and faculty.

Academic Movers 2015: In-Depth with Adam Rogers

Adam Rogers

In LJ’s latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Adam Rogers, emerging technology services librarian at North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries. Rogers leads the DIY creation and collaboration space in NCSU’s D.H. Hill Library and Hunt Library’s fully-equipped Maker space, which features 3-D printing, scanning, and laser cutting; electronics prototyping kits; and instructional workshops.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Colleen Theisen

Colleen Theisen

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Colleen Theisen, special collections outreach and engagement librarian and social media manager at the University of Iowa (UI) Libraries in Iowa City. Theisen has worked to promote the university’s special collections since she arrived in 2012, taking advantage of the ubiquity of social media to reach a popular audience as well as academic colleagues. News, highlights, and information about the library’s special collections—including the university archives, map collection, Hevelin fanzine collection, and the Iowa Women’s Archives can be found on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, YouTube, and Vine (and archived on a retired Pinterest page); the special collections Tumblr channel alone has 44,000 followers worldwide.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Matthew Cook

Matthew Cook

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Matthew Cook, emerging technology librarian at the University of Oklahoma (OU) Libraries, Norman, OK. Cook, who earned a Master of Arts in philosophy with a focus on cognition, has brought a level of outside-the-box thinking to his work in the library. Among other innovations, he implemented the digital Sparq Labyrinth, a walking meditation tool within the library that helps stressed students unwind and recharge at exam time, for which he won the University of Oklahoma Libraries Innovator’s Award in 2014. Currently, Cook is developing a campus-wide indoor navigation app and the O.V.A.L. (Oklahoma Virtual Academic Laboratory) virtual reality interactive teaching system.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Salwa Ismail

Salwa Ismail

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Salwa Ismail, head of library information technology at Georgetown University. Ismail leads, directs, and manages every aspect of the library’s technological operations. One of her primary projects has been DigitalGeorgetown, which hosts the university’s institutional repository (IR) and contains more than 210,000 digital items in over 200 collections. Ismail has also been instrumental in the library’s participation in Georgetown’s Initiative on Technology Enhanced Learning (ITEL), including the development of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in partnership with edX, and works with students and faculty on in Georgetown’s international campuses in Fiesole, Italy, and the School of Foreign Service in Doha, Qatar, on open access initiatives.

Proud Poetry Debut for 2014 Tech Leader | A Q&A With Devin Becker

Devin Becker

In the spring of 2014, Devin Becker, digital initiatives and web services librarian for the University of Idaho Library, Moscow, was recognized as an LJ Mover & Shaker for his “transformative” work with the University’s digital collections. Shortly afterward, his debut poetry collection Shame | Shame was selected from a field of 500 manuscripts as the winner of the A. Poulin Jr. Prize from publisher BOA Editions, Rochester, NY. Published in April 2015, the collection has been described by Guggenheim Fellowship and Whiting Award winner Michael Ryan as “a drop-dead funny book about desolation.” LJ recently caught up with Becker to discuss his debut.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Jason Clark

Jason Clark

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Jason Clark, associate professor and head of library informatics and computing at Montana State University Library, Bozeman, MT. While working as an assistant at Marquette University Library in the mid-1990s, Clark recognized the potential of the emergent World Wide Web to change the ways libraries shared and accessed information. An early adopter, he began writing code prototypes for library systems, and over the past ten years has enlarged his library’s computing team from a solo gig into a busy eleven-person department.

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Patrick Sullivan

SullivanWeb

In our latest 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Patrick Sullivan. Now retired from his position as instruction coordinator and business reference librarian at San Diego State University, Sullivan is one of the three cochairs, along with Lucía Gonzalez and Oralia Garza de Cortes, of the REFORMA Children In Crisis Project (CCP). REFORMA (the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latino and the Spanish Speaking) formed CCP in 2014 to help unaccompanied minors traveling from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, across the Texas and California border into the United States. CCP provides these children with backpacks containing age-appropriate Spanish-language books, a journal, and writing supplies that they can use in the shelters and group homes where they are detained, and afterward as they travel to their final destinations. According to CCP’s website, its mission is “to get books into the hands of these children, ensure that they have access to storytime materials, and to make all the recent arrivals aware of the wealth of library resources that are available to them here in the United States.”

Academic Movers 2015: In Depth with Hosea Tokwe

Hosea Tokwe

In our most recent 2015 In-Depth Interview with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Hosea Tokwe. In 2007 Tokwe, at the time a senior library assistant at Midlands State University (MSU) in Kweru, Zimbabwe, was given two boxes of books bound for the Matenda Primary School in rural Zimbabwe, donated by former students. The difficulties he encountered in simply getting the books to Matenda inspired him to singlehandedly establish a library at the school—no small task, as Zimbabwe was in the midst of ongoing political and social unrest and his first forays into the rural community were met with mistrust. But Tokwe prevailed, convincing the school to convert a classroom into its first library in 2008, and—in addition to serving as chief library assistant in MSU’s special collections department—he has continued to work with outside groups to continue to fill its shelves ever since.