December 19, 2014

Publishing

Nature Allows Article Sharing—With Restrictions

npg

In what at first looked to be a decisive move in the direction of open access (OA), Nature Publishing Group announced December 2 that it would officially adopt two initiatives that would provide access to articles previously available exclusively by subscription. But the new features come with restrictions that many see as a nod to OA in name only, and Nature News quickly corrected its initial headline, which read “Nature Makes All Articles Free to View”—but not before it was picked up by a number of news and social media outlets.

Creating the Future of Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

In my last two columns I explored what I called the “mess of ebooks” and explained what I want from library ebooks. In this column I want to discuss a possible future that could be good for libraries and for publishers. Right now everything is in flux. Publishers are understandably wary of selling Digital Rights Management (DRM)-free ebooks to libraries, and the patron driven acquisition (PDA) model some libraries want might not be sustainable for publishers. Libraries are struggling to buy books at all. The library ebook market is in a state of flux. There’s opportunity in chaos, though, and the opportunity here is to create a future that’s good for everyone, from publishers to library users.

SELF-e Comes to Cuyahoga | Self-Publishing and Libraries

Mitchell Davis of BiblioLabs speaks at the Cuyahoga Public Library SELF-E launch event

SELF-e is the partnership between Library Journal and Charleston, SC’s BiblioLabs. BiblioLab’s product, Biblioboard, is a platform that seeks to bring (among other things), self-published works into the library ecosystem. I spoke recently with Hallie Rich, Cuyahoga County Public Library’s Communications and External Relations Director, about the library’s pilot project with the platform.

Librarians React to Simon & Schuster Dropping “Buy It Now” Requirement

Simon & Schuster logo

Simon & Schuster (S & S) last week announced that it will no longer require libraries to offer a “buy it now” option with the publisher’s ebook titles. In theory, these buy it now links enable patrons to avoid long holds lists while ensuring that a small percentage of their purchases went to their library, rather than to an online retailer such as Amazon. However, many libraries and municipalities have policies in place prohibiting this type of arrangement, and others simply find the library-as-retailer concept objectionable or even unethical.

Indie Client Services Expand, Experiment | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

Several deals in late September and October highlighted continued expansion and new directions among the top three providers of distribution and client services to independent and small publishers: Perseus Books Group, IPG, and Ingram.

Three Press Directors Weigh in on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

up-week_square

As part of University Press week, November 9­­–15, the American Association of University Presses broadcast an online panel on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing via Google Hangouts. Moderated by Jennifer Howard, a senior reporter at the Chronicle of Higher Education, the panel featured Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press; Barbara Kline Pope, AAUP president and the executive director for The National Academies Press; and Ron Chrisman, director of the University of North Texas Press.

Amazon, Hachette End Ebook Pricing Dispute

amazon-hachette

Amazon and Hachette Book Group have ended the pricing dispute that the two have been waging since spring of 2014. On November 13 they jointly announced a multiyear agreement for ebook and print sales. The new terms will go into effect in early 2015, but Hachette has said that even before that time Amazon will restore its previous supply of Hachette titles and make them available for pre-order, as well as including them in promotions on the site.

Jukepop: Back to the Future | Self Publishing and Libraries

LaRue_color_new

Serialized writing has a long history, and can be hugely popular. It is said that American fans of Charles Dickens, eager to get the latest chapter of “The Old Curiosity Shop,” lined up at the docks of New York, shouting out to the crew of a ship that had not yet come to port, “Is little Nell dead?”

ITHAKA Sustainable Scholarship 2014 Brings Data and Process Together

I_ISS2014_square

On October 20–21, scholarly nonprofit organization ITHAKA held its annual Sustainable Scholarship conference at New York City’s Wyndham Hotel. The event’s theme, “At the Starting Line,” echoed the concerns of many libraries, publishers, and institutions about the demands for change driven by today’s information marketplace.

Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year.