December 7, 2016

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Large Print & Community Building

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In the previous article, we explored four libraries’ techniques for acquiring, curating, and promoting their large print collections. We also asked each librarian or manager to talk about how they use the collections in their community programs and outreach efforts. What we found was encouraging.

SPONSORED CONTENT

The Love of Reading Writ Large: Curating and Promoting Large Print Collections

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Serving the public good has long been the mandate of all libraries. Providing everyone with access to information, without regard to income or demographic differences, is perhaps a library’s most noble aspiration. For patrons with visual challenges, this has meant providing books in multiple formats, including large print.

Hachette To Buy Perseus Publishing Arm; Ingram To Acquire Distribution

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Hachette Book Group (HBG) announced on March 1 that it had entered into an agreement to buy the Perseus Books Group, an independent publishing company. On March 3, Ingram Content Group announced its plans to purchase Perseus’s distribution operations. The two agreements come a little more than 18 months after an initial deal to sell Perseus’s entire operation to HBG fell through. Both parties hope to close the deals by the end of March, pending regulatory approval. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

NYPL, Benetech Partner to Offer 370,000 Accessible Ebooks to Print Disabled

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The New York Public Library in December announced a new partnership with nonprofit Benetech, and the organization’s Bookshare solution, to provide print disabled patrons with access to more than 370,000 accessible ebooks through NYPL and the Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library. Although Bookshare provides free access to its collection for all U.S. students with qualifying disabilities through an award by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, access to the collection for qualifying adults, seniors, and other non-students generally requires payment of a $25 setup fee and a $50 annual subscription fee. The partnership to provide free access to library patrons through NYPL is Bookshare’s first such partnership with a U.S. library, and Benetech officials have stated that the organization is hoping to establish similar agreements with public libraries throughout the U.S.

Oyster Shuts Down; Perseus for Sale | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

Oyster, the $9.95 all-you-can-read monthly ebook subscription service that came on the scene in 2013, quietly announced on its blog that it “will be taking steps to sunset the existing Oyster service over the next several months,” according to tech news site Re/Code. Perseus Books Group, home to publishers including Basic Books, Da Capo Press, Running Press, Public Affairs, and Avalon Travel, as well as one of the leading providers of distribution and client services to 600-plus independent publishers through PGW, Consortium, Legato, et al., announced in early September that it is once again up for sale.

Altmetrics Ambassadors | Academic Libraries

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“Altmetrics: A manifesto,” published five years ago this month, described an academic publishing landscape in which the volume of literature was exploding, and the three traditional filters used to help researchers gauge the relative importance of individual papers in their fields—peer review, citation counting, and a journal’s average citations per article—were failing to keep up. Scholars were moving their work onto the web, and alternative, article-level metrics drawn from online reference managers Zotero and Mendeley, scholarly social bookmarking services such as CiteULike, or even page-views of blogs and “likes” or comments on mainstream social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter could be used to track the impact of new research in real time, wrote ­Impactstory ­cofounder Jason Priem; Wikimedia Foundation head of research Dario ­Taraborelli; Paul Groth, then-researcher VU University Amsterdam; and Cameron Neylon, then–senior scientist at the Science and Technology Facilities Council. Could these new metrics be just as relevant as peer review and citations when judging the impact and influence of new research?

Oxford U. Press, U. of Utah Library Collaborate on Study of Suicide Ethics

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Oxford University Press (OUP) and the University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library have joined forces on The Ethics of Suicide: Historical Sources, a hybrid print book and interactive digital archive. Compiled over nearly four decades by Margaret Pabst Battin, distinguished professor of philosophy and medical ethics at the university, the scholarly work comprises a 752-page volume published by OUP, linked via embedded QR codes to an extensive archive of source material hosted by the Marriott Library. The searchable archive contains excerpts, links to primary texts where available, and local library catalog records, and can be accessed independently of the book and free of charge. In addition, readers may submit comments to the archive—corrections, addenda, or suggestions of other material for inclusion.

An Interview with Peter Suber on Open Access | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

Cheryl LaGuardia interviews open-access expert Peter Suber.

NEH’s Public Scholar Program: Scholarly Writing for a Popular Audience

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The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will award $1.7 million in grants to 36 writers through its Public Scholar program, it announced on July 29. Open to authors of scholarly nonfiction, whether affiliated with an academic institution or writing independently, the Public Scholar program offers a $4,200 monthly stipend for periods from six months up to one year. Its ultimate goal, according to the NEH, is to “bring humanities scholarship beyond academic departments and university campuses and into book clubs and best-seller lists.”

No Cold Shoulder in Kentucky | Self-Publishing & Libraries

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A Computers in Libraries conference got Jim Blanton thinking: ebooks were on the rise. Self-publishing was taking off. How could libraries turn the challenge into an opportunity?