November 24, 2015

Shows & Events

Contracts for Content Mining | Charleston Conference 2015

IT Concept Data Mining Database A02

On Text & Data Mining Contracts—The Issues & the Needs, a panel of librarians and vendors convened to discuss how libraries, when making deals with vendors, can best support their researchers who want to text and data mine their resources. Moderated by Meg White, executive director of technology services, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, the panel also featured Daniel Dollar, director of collection development for the Yale University Library; Nancy Herther, sociology librarian, University of Minnesota; Darby Orcutt, assistant head of collection management, North Carolina State University Libraries; and Alicia Wise, director of access & policy, Elsevier.

Defining Diversity in Libraries | Charleston Conference 2015

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I first attended the Charleston Conference in 2013, and every year I am impressed with the quality and the wide range of topics being presented. These topics include but are not limited to collection assessment, models of acquisition, and trends in collection development. Held annually in November in Charleston, SC, the Charleston Conference is a venue where librarians, vendors, and publishers converge to discuss issues, management, and development in the life cycle of library collections and resources.

Manifold Scholarship Turns Scholarly Books into Iterative Digital Projects | Charleston Conference 2015

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During the Charleston Conference session “New Platforms and Discovery Tools: Towards 21st Century University Presses and Libraries”, two Mellon Foundation-funded projects were introduced: UPScope Project, a university press-wide discovery engine based on natural language searches, being developed by the Association of American University Presses, and the Manifold Scholarship project, detailed below.

Cost Per User: Analyzing EZProxy Logs for Collection Development | Charleston Conference 2015

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“Cost Per User: Analyzing EZProxy Logs for Collection Development,” presented at the 2015 Charleston Conference, explained how the Marydean Martin Library at Nevada State College is using EZProxy log data to learn more about users, with the ultimate goal of becoming an essential part of the institution’s predictive analytics framework for student success.

Charleston Connections | Charleston Conference Preview 2015

Photos courtesy of Charleston Convention & Visitors Bureau

The theme of this year’s Charleston Conference, SC, November 4–7, is “Where Do We Go from Here”—and, really, isn’t that the perfect articulation of the underlying theme of every library conference? But as LJ’s John Berry said in last year’s Charleston preview (“Uniquely Hospitable,” LJ 10/1/15, p. 38ff.), no matter what changes each year brings, the under­lying focus of Charleston remains “Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition” for academic and research librarians. As Big Deals shrink and journal prices rise, ljx151001webCharleston2acquisition models proliferate, and monographs join articles in the open access funding fray, there is no shortage of such concerns for attendees to sink their teeth into, in and around enjoying the famous foodie offerings of the host city.

OverDrive Working on PDF Conversion, Faster Cloud-based Platform

OverDrive logo

OverDrive is working on a project that could ultimately enable the company to convert PDFs and other file formats into the industry-standard EPUB format for ebooks, without significant loss of formatting and functionality, CEO Steve Potash said during his “Crystal Ball” presentation, which concluded the company’s biennial Digipalooza user group conference in Cleveland, OH earlier this month.

The ALA Takeaways | ALA San Francisco 2015 Report

GOOD TIMES AT ANNUAL. Top row, l.-r.: Celebrating the Supreme Court decision on the Defense of Marriage Act at San Francisco’s City Hall; on the show floor, 3M set up a Diversity Wall to promote diverse books and made a donation for each title suggested; Sunday’s Pride Parade headline said it all. Second row, l.-r.: ALA Keynoter Roberta Kaplan dovetailed with the historic events of the week in her speech at the Opening General Session; Enoch Pratt Free Library’s Melanie Townsend-Diggs and Carla Hayden (holding check, l.–r.) received TechLogic’s People First Award during the Opening Session; Sarah Lewis headlined at the ALA President’s Program, Third row, l.-r.:  the exhibits, as always, were a huge draw; the Knight Foundation took the opportunity to make a big announcement. Fourth row, l.-r.: part of the Auditorium Speaker Series, Gloria Steinem drew a crowd; the winners of the Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction were announced, with keynote by basketball legend–turned–novelist Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Nonfiction winner Bryan Stevenson (12)—Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption­—posed with well-wishers; fiction winner Anthony Doerr (13)—All the Light We Cannot See—was all smiles. Photos by Tom Graves and James Rosso/

The opening general session of this year’s American Library Association (ALA) conference in San Francisco was a victory celebration, thanks largely to ALA’s luck and planning in booking Roberta Kaplan, lawyer for the Supreme Court case that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, as the opening keynote. On the two-year anniversary of that case, the court found in favor of marriage equality, turning Kaplan’s appearance into so much more than a speech. While Sunday’s Pride Parade added logistical complications to travel, the mood was gala, with many of the 15,883 attendees and 6,813 exhibitors popping over to see the scene or participate. Total attendance was up by almost 3,000 compared with the 2014 annual conference in Las Vegas.

NYPL, CPL Wi-Fi Lending Pilots Progressing | ALA Annual 2015

NetGear Zing

Early results from two Knight News Challenge award-funded pilot programs indicate that mobile hotspot lending could help bridge the digital divide in city neighborhoods where broadband adoption is low, and home Internet subscriptions are considered a luxury. A capacity crowd was on hand to hear Luke Swarthout, director of adult education services for the New York Public Library (NYPL) and Michelle Frisque, chief of technology content and innovation for Chicago Public Library (CPL) discuss NYPL’s “Check Out the Internet” and CPL’s “Internet to Go” services during their “A Tale of Two Cities: NYPL and CPL Wi-Fi Lending Projects” presentation.

Libraries and Book Collections as Essential Cultural Institutions | ALA Annual 2015


While it has always fallen to libraries to preserve the historical record of the communities they serve, libraries also need to consider their own history—especially in light of the changing landscape they face. At the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference, a panel of three authors whose recent books focus on private, public, and academic libraries spoke with moderator Barbara Hoffert, editor of LJ’s Prepub Alert, on Libraries and Book Collections as Essential Cultural Institutions: A Historical and Forward-Looking Perspective. The panelists discussed their own studies, and charged libraries to examine the cultural legacies of their own collections.

Rethinking Privacy at the LITA Top Tech Trends Panel | ALA Annual 2015

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Librarians should not be afraid to discuss both positive and negative implications of collecting and analyzing patron data, library technology consultant Carson Block said during the Library and Information Technology Association’s (LITA) Top Tech Trends panel during the American Library Association’s Annual Conference on June 28. “We’ve limited ourselves by saying, ‘We don’t want to touch [the topic of data collection] because we might be infringing on patron confidentiality and privacy,’” he said. “I think that’s too simplistic of a view. I think, in fact, we have to embrace looking at data collection to serve our patrons…and protecting confidentiality and privacy. I think we’re the only organization[s] that really care about actually protecting that pile of data.”