December 19, 2014

Shows & Events

Making More from Less: Data Driven Alchemy at the Charleston Conference

Charleston_conference_logosquare

The Charleston Conference felt bigger than ever this year, with multiple attendees in the halls and elevators commenting on the profusion of programs at multiple venues, the standing room only grounds for popular breakout sessions, and the fact that they could no longer count on seeing everyone they know among the other attendees in the course of the conference. It is equally impossible to see even a fraction of the many compelling programs presented during the event; below is only our impression from the handful we could personally attend.

Uniquely Hospitable | Charleston Conference Preview 2014

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The Charleston Conference is unique! Since its founding by Katina Strauch in 1980 it has provided professional enrichment, knowledge, and open discussion to thousands of librarians, information specialists, and vendors primarily focused on academic and research libraries. There is a huge array of programs, panels, and speakers, plus days of informal inter­actions in which librarians at all levels and vendors talk about their work, problems, innovations, and best practices in a charming setting, redolent with Southern hospitality.

CALI Author and Open Education | Peer to Peer Review

Dorothea Salo

Last month I enjoyed the distinct privilege of keynoting the Conference for Law School Computing (also known as “CALIcon”), a gathering of legal educators, law librarians, and IT professionals in law put together by the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI). I can’t say enough in praise of the ever-present spirit of sly spirited fun at this conference.

Library Simplified Works on Three-Click Access for Library Ebooks | ALA 2014

Library Simplified

Library ebook transactions remain too lengthy and complicated for patrons, especially in comparison with consumer ebook transactions, James English, product manager for the Library Simplified project at the New York Public Library (NYPL) said during his “EPUB: Walled Gardens and the Readium Foundation” presentation at the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) Book Industry Study Group (BISG) Eighth Annual Forum, held June 27 in conjunction with the American Library Association (ALA) 2014 Annual Conference. The group is working to make an open, commercial-grade ereader for libraries that would greatly simplify this process.

What Happened in Vegas | ALA 2014

Voices for the Future ALA Pres Barbara Stripling addresses the Opening General Session crowd, and keynote speaker Jane McGonical talking gaming of another kind. Photos by Andrew Estey, Studio J Inc./AP Images for Library Journal

The 2014 American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference & Exhibition, held June 26 – July 1 at the Las Vegas Convention Center, saw some 13,019 attendees. Though this is a pretty substantial drop-off compared with the 20,237 attendees who came to Chicago in 2013, it is higher than the 12,000+ attendees who visited Annual in Anaheim, CA in 2012. Critiques of the location, which has not hosted an ALA annual conference since 1973, included the vast distances between event sites and the expensive transportation—and, of course, the heat, which topped out at 111 degrees. However, those who did attend seemed excited about the exhibit hall’s 800 company offerings, and heavy crowds surging toward the galley giveaways greeted the exhibit openings on both Friday evening and Saturday morning.

Student Journals an Opportunity for Libraries as Publishers | ALA 2014

At ALA 2014, academic librarians working as publishers gathered to discuss the state of their partnerships and what needs to happen to move the budding library publishing industry forward at the panel “Libraries in the Publishing Game: New Roles from Content to Access.” Melinda Dermody, head of access and sharing at Syracuse University libraries, moderated the panel, which included Catherine Mitchell, director of the Access & Publishing group at the California Digital Library (CDL), Rebecca Kennison Director of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship at Columbia University, and Cyril Oberlander, library director at the State University of New York (SUNY) Geneseo.

Quirky Books for Fall 2014 | ALA Annual 2014

Quirky Books for Fall 2014 | ALA Annual 2014

Sally Reed, executive director of United for Libraries, a division of the American Library Association (ALA) that represents the interests of advocates such as friends groups and trustees, encouraged librarians at the “Quirky Books for Quirky Librarians” panel to join her organization before introducing six authors with new or upcoming books. The authors, a few […]

Banned Books Week Announces Comics Focus | ALA 2014

CBLDF Handbook 2014

The 2014 American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Las Vegas this week set the stage for Banned Books Week, scheduled for September 21-27, 2014. This year, Banned Books Week will shine light on banned and challenged comic books and graphic novels. On the show floor, the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF), which provides legal support and expertise to readers, authors, and librarians, debuted a new handbook offering rundowns of commonly challenged comic titles, myths about banned books, and ideas for programming around Banned Books Week.

BookCon To Expand In 2015

Attendees stood in line for hours to see author John Green. Image courtesy @Stanguderski

This year, the industry trade show Book Expo America (BEA) opened its doors to non-industry types, giving readers one day to flood New York’s Javits Center and connect with literary superstars at BookCon, a fan-driven event that grew out of the previous years’ Power Readers Day. While BookCon was a hit with many, bringing thousands of readers out to fill the show floor and rub elbows with their favorite authors, the event was not without some hiccups. Changes are already in store for next year’s iteration.

CUNY Helps Libraries Take Stock

William and Anita Newman Conference Center, 7th floor

On June 6, the City University of New York (CUNY) held its first library assessment conference. Called Reinventing Libraries: Reinventing Assessment, the event grew from its initial target of 100 attendees to almost twice that many, and positive feedback from many attendees included calls for the conference to be repeated, or even turn into an annual event. Several recurring themes became leit motifs running throughout the day: turning from an emphasis on exclusively quantitative to qualitative assessment, libraries partnering with faculty on instruction, and the intersection of outcomes measurement and predictive analytics in a new granular portrait of individual students’ library use.